Monthly Archives: July 2015

Making sure it works – testing the new London.gov.uk | London City Hall

Testing software and websites is a challenge. We need to ensure that the final product is fit for purpose, and as good as it can possibly be. We must also understand it can never be totally free of bugs. We do lots of different types of testing from User Acceptance Testing (UAT) to performance and accessibility testing. All of this is essential to make sure that the final website does everything it’s supposed to do.

Another important aspect of testing the website as it develops is ‘usability testing’ where we ask invite end users to test new designs or functionality of the website. We’ll be writing more about this part of testing in a future blog post.

Source: Making sure it works – testing the new London.gov.uk | London City Hall

Accessible IT, assistive technology and working with a disability in tech

Accessible IT, assistive technology and working with a disability in techAccessible IT and assistive technology need to be ingrained in the DNA of the organisation, according to executives from the Royal National Institute for the Blind, BBC and Natural Resources Wales – to enable those working in tech with a disability and to give CIOs a greater understanding of user requirements.

“It’s a CIO’s responsibility to ensure the ICT across the whole enterprise – both internally and externally facing – is accessible to those who use the multitude of assistance software.”It is key that every time we consider a new system, we look at its compatibility with the assistance software that’s available and also make sure it meets W3C standards – this is particularly important for intranet and internet sites. We make sure that accessibility impact assessments form part of every solution design review and software procurement – indeed we consider all nine protected characteristics not just disability.”

Source: Accessible IT, assistive technology and working with a disability in tech

Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo And Others Push For Accessibility Development – ReadWrite

For all their rhetoric and idealism about changing the world, consumer-facing technologies have largely failed at least one major set of users: people with disabilities, a segment that represents roughly 1 in 5 people in the U.S.As the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disability Act (ADA) approaches, a new group has formed to champion the cause of development for accessibility. Several educators and tech companies have joined forces in an effort dubbed Teaching Accessibility. According to its website, the group aims to address the “lack of awareness and understanding of basic accessibility issues, concepts and best practices.” Key participants include Carnegie Mellon and Stanford, as well as Adobe, AT&T, Dropbox, Facebook, Intuit, LinkedIn, Microsoft and Yahoo.

Source: Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo And Others Push For Accessibility Development – ReadWrite

Hands-Free ‘Mouse’ Wins AT&T Accessibility Award

The $25,000 grand prize went to Kinesic Mouse, a software solution that uses a 3D camera to detect facial expressions and head rotations so that users can operate a PC hands-free. The Kinesic Mouse also won the $10,000 “Best Mobility Solution” category, bringing its total cash winnings to $35,000….

(curated by Lifekludger)
Complete story at source: Google Alert – accessibility http://ift.tt/1ONW7WW

Layout Tables Tip

It’s 2015, so hopefully web developers know that table elements should not be used for layout. There are many reasons why CSS for layout is better but at the core, HTML tables are data tables; they’ve always been meant for data.

If a table is used for layout, add ARIA role of presentation to the table element. This will remove the table elements from the Accessibility API which provides for a better user experience for users of assistive technology, particularly screen readers.

(curated by Lifekludger from Layout Tables Tip)
Complete article at source: http://ift.tt/1vaYBth