Monthly Archives: September 2015

iOS 9 and Accessibility: My 5 Favorite Details – MacStories

I’ve made the case more than once that accessibility, conceptually, is not a domain exclusive to the disabled. Certainly, persons with disabilities will always be the target market for accessibility features, but I think many fully-abled people overlook the fact that accessibility features can help them too. To me, the canonical example is larger text. […]

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Read full article at Source: iOS 9 and Accessibility: My 5 Favorite Details – MacStories

ALTA uses accessible design for rehabilitation center

brazilian architecture firm ALTA was commissioned with the expansion of the centro universitário metodista – IPA’scentral campus in porto alegre. the project’s brief asked for the addition of a new physical rehabilitation center that celebrates the tradition of the institution in physical education and physiotherapy teachings. …


the central square sits in the middle of the school’s campus

the contemporary design of the truss-based structure features a brise-soleil that reduces heat, and dominates the façade while creating shadows that play with the interior’s main gallery.

with all this in mind, the project results in a campus designed for people with disabilities, with the laws of accessibility applied throughout the scheme.

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ALTA uses accessible design for rehabilitation center

Web Accessibility Testing for the Rest of Us

Accessibility testing can be a daunting task, especially when one does not know where to start. With so many things to take into consideration and so many tools to choose from, the least we can say is that it’s very easy to feel lost! This class is intended for anyone who doesn’t consider himself or herself to be an accessibility expert, yet sometimes needs to assess accessibility in his or her daily job. If this is your case, if you sometimes feel helpless about web accessibility and only wish you knew where to start and what to do, look no further – this class is for you!

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Read full article at source: http://www.slideshare.net/webconforme/access-u2014-a11ytestingfortherestofusfinal

Accessibility for E-Learning: Section 508 and WCAG

E-learning is a type of web-based content, and therefore, the technical standards outlined in the WCAG and Section 508 §1194.22 apply, if you want or need to make your e-learning courses accessible to those with disabilities. If you’re creating e-learning content for a U.S. government entity, your e-learning content likely needs to be 508-compliant. Several state government entities also require 508-compliance. Also, if you’re not creating e-learning courses directly for a government agency, but you provide services to or are funded by the government, it’s likely that some form of 508-compliance also applies to you.

Similar laws exist in other countries for their government entities, but most other countries have chosen to adopt WCAG as a legal requirement, rather than drafting their own rules. So if you’re creating e-learning content for government entities in other countries, there’s a chance that some level of the WCAG applies to you.

Even if you aren’t required by law to meet the guidelines, isn’t making your e-learning courses more accessible to people with disabilities the right thing to do? You may immediately think “Yes,” however, that the extra cost, effort, and sometimes compromised experience keep many non-government organizations from making accessibility a priority. Instead, they will often choose to use “reasonable accommodation” and provide training in another way, such as having someone sit down with the person and go through the training together.

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Source: Accessibility for E-Learning: Section 508 and WCAG

Text justification and accessibility | Access iQ

Text justification is the spacing of text across a page or column where both left and right margins are aligned to create a clean and block look. It is often favoured by graphic designers or people who create brochures or other display advertising.From an accessibility perspective, we need to be aware of how text justification may affect the readability of a document for some people.

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Read full article at Source: Text justification and accessibility | Access iQ

How Google designs for the blind

All the big technology companies have dedicated teams working on accessibility — making software and hardware features that allow people with disabilities to use them. Employing people who have disabilities is one way to make sure tools are built with accessibility in mind…

Someone with perfect vision might not think to design traffic maps that can be understood by a colorblind user. YouTube engineer Ken Harrenstien, who is profoundly deaf, made it his mission to work on closed captioning for videos.

“If you don’t have an immediate family member or a friend who has a disability, you simply don’t know. It’s not that you want to exclude someone who has a disability, you just don’t know it,” said Astrid Weber, a user experience researcher at Google whose work has been influenced by a close friend with MS.

Weber collaborates with Google’s thousands of engineers and designers to make them think of accessibility while building products. She encourages employees to design with empathy, and to drop certain assumptions, like that everyone can touch an Android device or hear the sound an app makes.

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Read full article at Source: How Google designs for the blind – Aug. 4, 2015

Lesson in Accessibility at Amusement Parks | Eric Lipp

…but then we went to Banshee and were stopped, properly, by the parks staff and I was asked if my brace was soft. I said “parts of it are hard.” I was then informed that I would be unable to ride this massive, new attraction because, “per manufacturers’ specs” no guest wearing a brace or cast that is made of hard material may ride. I thought for a moment and said “well, that sounds crazy because I have been on coasters and rides across the globe and have never been denied because I wear a “hard brace.”

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Read full article at Source: Lesson in Accessibility at Amusement Parks | Eric Lipp

Using the button role – Accessibility | MDN

The button role should be used for clickable elements that trigger a response when activated by the user. On its own, role=”button” can make any element (e.g. p, span or div) appears as a button control to a screen reader. Additionally, this role can be used in combination with the aria-pressed attribute in order to create toggle buttons.

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Read full article at Source: Using the button role – Accessibility | MDN