Monthly Archives: September 2015

Easy Web Accessibility Practices for Design & Front-End Dev.

It’s a widely accepted truth that accessibility on the web is important. Of course, everybody should have equal access to technology! However, when it comes down to it and project timelines and budgets are at stake, it can be more difficult to put this belief into practice.  As technology continues to emerge and best practices continue to evolve, it can also be difficult to keep up–last year’s best practice may have already been discarded in favor of something else. In this post, I’d like to share a few easy ways that we can all improve web accessibility.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Easy Web Accessibility Practices for Design & Front-End Dev.

‘Responsive street furniture’ in cities could boost accessibility – Yahoo News Canada

…what if the city itself could adapt to the individual needs of the people on the street? Imagine street lights that get brighter as a visually impaired pedestrian approaches, signs that can announce their location out loud, a street crossing that gives extra time to an elderly person, or benches that fold down for someone who needs a place to rest. That’s the vision of Ross Atkin, a British designer and engineer who has created what he calls “responsive street furniture.” The urban fixtures connect to a

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: ‘Responsive street furniture’ in cities could boost accessibility – Yahoo News Canada

Accessibility Guidelines for United Nations Websites

Better UN websites for everyone

Accessible websites benefit everyone, not just those with disabilities. On an accessible website, the user is put at the centre of the experience. Text is more readable. Content is better organized. The design is clean and simple. This website will show you how to make your site accessible, and make it better for all, by using the latest web technology.

The General Assembly has designated the Department of Public Information as the focal point for web accessibility in the United Nations. This site is part of DPI’s effort to fulfil its mandate and promote web accessibility in the UN system. (A/RES/68/86 A-B)

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility Guidelines for United Nations Websites

Wearable First Rethinking Accessible Design | WearAbility

Wearable devices go beyond the watch and eye glasses. This presentation introduces the wide variety of devices and how they can make the world more accessible.  This article by Smithsonian explains how the pocket watch was wearable-first design…

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Wearable First Rethinking Accessible Design | WearAbility

Accessible Text Input in Android | Deque Systems

The default text entry field in Android is the EditText object. EditText objects are difficult because the common practices for making Android UI elements accessible (content descriptions), do not work. Android provides the framework to make EditText objects accessible, but it is important to know what, when, and how to use the built-in tools.

….

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessible Text Input in Android | Deque Systems | Software, Training, and Consulting for Web Accessibility and Section 508 Compliance

Eleanor Smith Inclusive Home Design Act Will Make Homes Accessible | Rep. Jan Schakowsky

There should be more of this particular type of sensible law emanating from our Political leaders!

Today, I introduced the Eleanor Smith Inclusive Home Design Act, which would require new homes built with federal dollars to meet accessibility standards — including a zero-step entrance, wheelchair accessible doorways and bathrooms, and climate controls that are at a height reachable from a wheelchair.

Above, I announced the introduction of this legislation to advocates at a Rally with the National Council on Independent Living. They support the legislation.

For too long, the federal government has supported the development of housing that is not visitable or livable for those with mobility impairments.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Eleanor Smith Inclusive Home Design Act Will Make Homes Accessible | Rep. Jan Schakowsky

Accessibility Shouldn’t Be a Mystery | edUi Conference

In the past several years, ensuring web content is accessible to people with disabilities has received a lot more attention than ever before. New regulations are coming out that align US government accessibility requirements with the guidelines established by the World Wide Web Consortium Web Accessibility Initiative; courts are ruling that the Internet is a place of public accommodation and subject to accessibility laws; and most importantly, businesses and higher ed organizations are realizing that including people with disabilities is the right thing to do.

Yet what accessibility means to people with disabilities and the impact it can have once guidelines are followed can be a source of mystery for the general web public and for organizations that recognize the need to comply but are confused about exactly what to do.

I’d like to de-mystify this for you, and ensure you that accessibility is far less about specific disabilities and much more about general user experience best practices. But first, let’s get some terms straight.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility Shouldn’t Be a Mystery | edUi Conference

IoT Innovations Offer Essential Benefits for People with Disabilities

Today, Internet-connected devices offer a similar potential to transform quality of life for many folks, particularly for people with disabilities.  These innovations are ushering in a new societal revolution, one in which anything (and everything) can be connected.

These connected devices, known as the Internet of Things (IoT), offer almost limitless potential for benefit, especially for older adults and people with disabilities.  This is also the subject of a new paper by G3ict titled “Internet of Things: New Promises for Persons with Disabilities,” which was developed with support from AT&T.

Recent developments in networks and devices are fueling new IoT innovations and applications.  According to the Gartner Group, the number of connected devices is set to explode, from 4.9 billion this year to 25 billion—or perhaps even 50 billion—by 2020.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: IoT Innovations Offer Essential Benefits for People with Disabilities