Monthly Archives: October 2015

Map Traffic Lights for the Visually Impaired

Imagine trying to cross a busy city street without being able to see the traffic lights change color or glance down the road to make sure the oncoming cars have stopped. For the blind and visually impaired, that’s just one aspect of navigating the world that presents a challenge, but an app called SeeLight aims to solve this problem, one traffic light at a time.

Only 10 percent of traffic lights are equipped with audible signals and tactile paving that helps the visually impaired “feel” their way safely across the road, according to Hungry Boys, the Russian digital agency that pioneered development of the SeeLight app.

While it might not be realistic to expect traffic lights worldwide to soon be optimized for use by the blind, with this app, it might not matter.

The app, which is available globally for free download on iTunes, helps users “see” crossing lights by providing information such as the distance between the user and the closest light, whether there is tactile pavement on the road and how many seconds remain until the light changes from green to red or vice versa. Voice navigation helps users safely and confidently get around town, whether they’re walking to their local supermarket or exploring a new city.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Map Traffic Lights for the Visually Impaired

Usability, Accessibility and Telehealth | Open Health News

The telehealth market is expected to grown at phenomenal rates in the next few years. Recent reports claim that the global telehealth market may reach $6.5 billion over the next five years at an annual growth rate of 24.2 percent. Healthcare IT is known to have usability problems, but for telehealth companies to survive they will need to fully embrace a patient/user-centered design approach with significant investment in accessibility and Section 508 compliance. Here is one reason why:

Many people will be using telehealth when they are sick.

Imagine waking up with a high fever and severe head-ache and reaching for your mobile device to contacting your on-line doctor. Normally you would have no problems focusing on the screen, selecting items and entering information into your device. But, this time, you have blurry vision, and limited higher-order cognitive functioning.

Section 508, and other accessibility protocols must be followed so that patients with temporary disabilities will be able to reach out to their doctor with on-line tools.

Designing telehealth tools for healthy people will not provide a satisfying user experience for those seeking virtual medical advice that are currently, or chronically disabled.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Usability, Accessibility and Telehealth | Open Health News

Web applications and ARIA FAQ – Accessibility | MDN

WAI-ARIA is the Accessible Rich Internet Applications specification from the Web Accessibility Initiative at the W3C. ARIA provides a means to make web applications and widgets more accessible to a diverse range of users, including those who use assistive technologies such as screen readers or magnifiers.

ARIA provides additional semantics to describe the role, state, and functionality of many familiar user interface controls, such as menus, sliders, trees, and dialogs. It also provides additional structural information, helping authors identify landmarks, regions, and grids on their pages. ARIA enables dynamic, JavaScript-driven applications and widgets to interoperate with a variety of desktop-based assistive technologies.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Web applications and ARIA FAQ – Accessibility | MDN

A Guide to Color, UX, and Conversion Rates

Color is one of the most powerful tools in the designer’s toolkit. You can use color to impact users’ emotions, draw their attention, and put them in the right frame of mind to make a purchase. It’s also one of the main factors in customers’ perception of a brand. With an infinite number of possible color combinations out there, it can be hard to decide what colors will make the biggest impact on your site or app. It would be impossible to test everything, but we’ve picked up a few tricks and trends about how color affects users’ attitudes and behavior.

In this article, we’ll cover basic color theory, psychology, accessibility issues, and impact on conversion rate. We’ll also share some of the findings from a recent 50-person study we ran to find out how men and women perceive color schemes differently and how color can attract attention and make a website memorable.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: A Guide to Color, UX, and Conversion Rates

The web pioneers who are making the world accessible to everyone, regardless of disability | Daily Mail Online

For the ten million plus people in the UK with a disability, it has long been a challenge to find places to stay that meet their needs.

But things are improving.

Disabled people with a love for travel are using the internet and social media to help others find accessible accommodation.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The web pioneers who are making the world accessible to everyone, regardless of disability | Daily Mail Online

7 Things Every Designer Needs to Know about Accessibility — Salesforce UX — Medium

Accessibility enables people with disabilities to perceive, understand, navigate, interact with, and contribute to the web. Imagine a world where developers know everything there is to know about accessibility. You design it and they build it… perfectly. In this world, only the design itself can cause people with disabilities to have trouble using a product.

These guidelines will cover the major things you need to know in order for your products to be “design-ready” to meet the minimum of standards in Section 508 and the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0. The rest will be up to development and quality testing.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 7 Things Every Designer Needs to Know about Accessibility — Salesforce UX — Medium

Smartphones, apps are liberating the blind and visually impaired

Ruben Morales, a blind 59-year-old retired engineer who lives in this Silicon Valley city, has used a specialized screen-reading program for years to write and run spreadsheets on his desktop computer.

But recently, he figuratively cut the cord to his desktop and joined the mobile revolution.

… learning how to use an iPhone’s features for vision-impaired people… “It’s pretty amazing.” Morales said, demonstrating how he can call up a song and play it with a few taps. “Whatever I can do on the computer I can basically do it on the iPhone. It has the same capability.

”The smartphone, a gadget designed for the sighted, has turned out to be a godsend for the blind and visually impaired, making them more independent than ever before.”

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Smartphones, apps are liberating the blind and visually impaired

4 tips on typography in UI design – InVision Blog

by Chris Bowleron April 6, 2015

Communication plays a vital role in design. Whether you design websites, mobile apps, or wearable UIs, your creations have to clearly communicate their intent and purpose. And since text does a lot of the heavy lifting in communicating purpose, you need a solid understanding of typography.

Of course, designing a user interface differs from designing an ebook or blog theme. But the principles of type-centric design still apply. After all, on-screen communication happens through words, and type is the UI of language.

As Oliver Reichenstein states in his seminal essay, “Web Design is 95% Typography”:

Optimizing typography is optimizing readability, accessibility, usability(!), overall graphic balance.

In other words: optimizing your typography also optimizes your UI.

Here are 4 ways to do just that—plus 3 beautiful products that make the most of their type.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 4 tips on typography in UI design – InVision Blog

How to do a DIY Web Accessibility Audit | Usability Matters

Before you begin an accessibility audit, it’s important to know why you want your digital product to be accessible. Are you trying to comply with AODA or meet WCAG 2.0 standards? Maybe you’d like to create an accessible website in order to reach as many users as possible.

Know your digital accessibility goals and what standards you need to meet to achieve those goals so you have something to measure your digital product against.

It’s a good idea to have a list of any standards (most commonly WCAG 2.0 Level A and AA) readily available that you can reference as you work your way through the process.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How to do a DIY Web Accessibility Audit | Usability Matters

Apple to provide accessibility support around NDIS conference | Media Access Australia

Apple is presenting its accessibility technologies at the NDIS New World Conference in Brisbane next week. The tech giant has prepared an “Accessible House” in the main conference exhibition space, with an interactive exhibit promoting and featuring accessible devices, apps and accessories to assist people to do more around the home and office.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Apple to provide accessibility support around NDIS conference | Media Access Australia