Monthly Archives: November 2015

⚡Presentation “1 Accessibility 101 Dr. John Slatin, Director Accessibility Institute University of Texas at Austin.”

1 Accessibility 101 Dr. John Slatin, Director Accessibility Institute University of Texas at Austin.View more presentations from Iris Sharon Porter

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Are your icons usable and accessible? 6 tips for better icon use in apps and online

iconsGraphic icons are a powerful way to enhance usability and accessibility in apps and online, but only if they are chosen and implemented with care. Here are some tips from Emanuela Gorla, a usability and accessibility consultant at System Concepts.

Real world examples and expert tips on the use of icons in apps and online, from usability and accessibility specialist Sophie Buda.


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Tech companies should care more about customers with disabilities.

The Blind Deserve Tech Support, Too

Why don’t tech companies care more about customers with disabilities?

Finding himself in the position of having to justify his disability to a person who was intent on questioning its reality, Bahram asked—in terms he admits were rather pointed—that the call be escalated to a manager.

But accessible technology is more than just a personal issue for Bahram; it’s his profession. As president of Prime Access Consulting, he helps companies and institutions align their websites and products with principles of inclusive and universal design. He was struck by the contrast: Here he was helping other companies become more accessible, and yet the company that made his computer did not appear to be taking those lessons to heart when training its staff.

“Tech companies are becoming more accessible in their product lines, but their social structure is stuck in 1983.”

Source: Tech companies should care more about customers with disabilities.

» Seriously, Don’t Use Icon Fonts Cloud Four Blog

… icons on the web have had their fair share of challenges. They were time-consuming to prepare for every intended display size and color. When high-resolution displays hit the market, icons looked particularly low-res and blocky compared to the text they often accompanied.

So it’s really no wonder that icon fonts became such a hit. Icons displayed via @font-face were resolution-independent and customizable in all the ways we expected text to be. Sure, delivering icons as a typeface was definitely a hack, but it was also useful, versatile, and maybe even a little fun.

But now we need to stop. It’s time to let icon fonts pass on to Hack Heaven, where they can frolic with table-based layouts, Bullet-Proof Rounded Corners and Scalable Inman Flash Replacements. Here’s why…

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Labeled With Love, From the Notebook of Aaron Gustafson

Labeled With Love by Aaron Gustafson

This is the first entry in the series Modern Web Form Best Practices. Forms exist on pretty much every site on the web in one form or another. They are the primary mechanism by which we gather information from our users.1 Of course, before anyone can fill out a form, they need to know what it’s asking for.

Labeling is key.A few months back, I relayed a story from Facebook about how important the wording of their questions was in getting accurate responses from their users. The words we choose are incredibly important—your interface is a conversation with your users. I highly recommend reading up on that (and listening to the Radiolab episode that spurred me to write it), but I’m going to spend the remainder of this post talking about the utilitarian aspects of labels and how to use them properly in your forms.

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ADA 25th anniversary: The Internet should be accessible for the disabled.

Last month FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly told us the Internet is “not a necessity.”

At a speech to the Internet Innovation Alliance, an organization that promotes broadband accessibility, O’Rielly said people “can and do” live without Internet access. “Instead,” he offered, “the term necessity should be reserved to those items that humans cannot live without such as food, shelter, and water.”

When he made this statement, the commissioner was presumably thinking of the parts of life online that sometimes irk us: teens’ eyes locked on their smartphones, the innumerable cat videos, polarizing rants of political candidates and other talking heads on social media. His understanding appears to be based on Vint Cerf’s feeling that technology “is an enabler of rights, not a right itself.”

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What Developers Should Know For A Universally Accessible Internet | Universally Designed

WHAT DEVELOPERS SHOULD KNOW FOR A UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE INTERNET

Web accessibility is the practice of removing any barriers to interaction with technology for anyone, including people with disabilities. Simply put, this means that when you create an application or a website, everyone should be able to access it.

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Design for Everyone Guide | Sport and Recreation Victoria

The guide is a resource that uses the principles of Universal Design to provide users with an understanding of how to apply the philosophy of Universal Design during the design and construction phases of a new building or the redevelopment of a current facility.

The concept of Universal Design is to simplify life for everyone by making the built environment more usable to as many users as possible.

It is separate from accessible design as Universal Design is based on the equitable use of a facility and social inclusion and not the measurement of accessible design features and meeting minimum legislative requirements.

Applied holistically to a building without an alternative for different groups, Universal Design addresses issues of having a different approach for different users, which not only improves and simplifies the way a facility is used but also eliminates user segregation to maximise participation by users of all abilities.

http://www.sport.vic.gov.au/design-for-everyone-guide

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Read full article at Source: Design for Everyone Guide | Sport and Recreation Victoria