Monthly Archives: March 2016

Deaf News: Deaf woman is awarded e-Accessibility scholarship for mobile app for interpreters and carers | The Limping Chicken

A Deaf woman has been awarded an EDF-Oracle e-Accessibility scholarship for her project developing a mobile application to seamlessly connect persons with disabilities with caregivers, interpreters and assistants.Caroline Hurley is studying computer science at Open University in the United Kingdom.

THE AWARDED PROJECT

Caroline’s project is to develop a mobile application to seamlessly connect persons with disabilities with caregivers, interpreters and assistants. Through this application, persons with disabilities can be able to quickly check care workers’ nearest location and their availability. For example, a case study showed how a deaf person spent an entire day to find a sign language interpreter for a next-day doctor’s appointment, since there are very few interpreters in the European Union (EU). Caroline’s application can be beneficial to people with disabilities requiring ‘face-to-face’ care workers urgently.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Deaf News: Deaf woman is awarded e-Accessibility scholarship for mobile app for interpreters and carers | The Limping Chicken

Facebook taps artificial intelligence for users with disabilities

Calif. — Matt King, a software engineer who has been blind since college, came to Facebook last summer with a mission: to make websites and mobile apps friendlier for people like him with disabilities.

King, 50, uses screen-reader software that turns Web pages and documents into synthesized speech. The challenge he confronts every day: As many as half of websites are nearly impossible for him to browse.

Facebook is re-engineering its website and mobile apps, and it’s brainstorming a new generation of futuristic products that harness the power of artificial intelligence to improve the experience of Facebook for people with disabilities.

The first is an automated captioning tool launching in April that will help the visually impaired “see” a photo on Facebook by describing what’s in it.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Facebook taps artificial intelligence for users with disabilities

Changing Places: Meet Vaila Morrison, Architect and a woman on a mission to champion inclusive design and improve quality of life through better accessibility – Womanthology

Meet Vaila Morrison tells Womanthology about championing inclusive design through the Changing Places campaign

Vaila Morrison is an architect with a passion for inclusive design and sustainability. She is not currently practicing as she is also a mum and carer to a young daughter with significant disabilities (attributed to an undiagnosed neurological condition), and a young son. Vaila is busy working on Our Inclusive Home, a project which encourages architects and designers to produce places and spaces which will welcome people of all needs.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Changing Places: Meet Vaila Morrison, Architect and a woman on a mission to champion inclusive design and improve quality of life through better accessibility – Womanthology

How to Implement Web Accessibility Guidelines in WordPress

WordPress Tools for Web Accessibility

While the above info is enough to build an accessible website manually, there is no need to do so, thanks to a number of available tools that we will go over now.

WordPress Themes

First of all, a growing number of certified-accessible WordPress themes enable us to address this issue from the very beginning.

What it means is that the themes are built with W3C-validated code and contain accessibility features that abide by WCAG standards.While they work well out of the box, accessibility-ready themes can also serve as a parent theme for your own customizations and represent a good basis for building an accessible website.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How to Implement Web Accessibility Guidelines in WordPress

Accessible media preview from CSUN 

The annual International Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference (commonly known as CSUN) starts on 21 March in San Diego, California.

This year there is significant coverage around accessible media. Media Access Australia’s CEO, Alex Varley, previews some personal highlights.

A detailed program of the presentations covering technology for disabled people is on the CSUN 2016 website(link is external).

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessible media preview from CSUN | Media Access Australia

For Video Games, Easy Mode Equals Better Accessibility // Tiny Girl Tiny Games – Nintendo 3DS, Mobile, and More

I’m currently playing Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam, and largely enjoying it. It’s no Paper Mario: Thousand Year Door, but few things in life are.

Like all games in the Mario RPG family, Paper Jam expertly mixes action with menu-based commands.

You’d think “The ‘A’ button controls Mario’s actions, and the ‘B’ button controls Luigi’s actions” is as easy as instructions get, but apparently there’s some kind of bottleneck on my nerve impulse highway. The commands that whip between my brain and fingers go careening over the guardrail, and Luigi dies.

Then I discovered Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam offers clear cues indicating which brother an enemy has its sights set on. The cues, which are optional and can be turned on and off on the fly, give my reflexes and my brain sufficient time to chat and formulate a plan for survival.

See, I’ve had coordination issues all my life. I still mix up my left and my right, and I have to pause to make sure I’m not putting on my clothes backwards. … I see a lot of “wtf, this chick can’t use scissors or a pencil, lol.”

I definitely wouldn’t equate it to being disabled in any regard, but nevertheless I have little control over the quirk, and it’s made things kind of weird and difficult at times.

I’m not asking for EVO to include a “Hooray, Everyone’s a Winner!!” bracket. I’m asking people to remain calm when Nintendo offers kids, busy parents, and people with varying physical weaknesses and disabilities the option to skip a level in Yoshi’s Wooly World instead of forcing them to stay mired in some level of Bad Sweater Hell.

Source: For Video Games, Easy Mode Equals Better Accessibility // Tiny Girl Tiny Games – Nintendo 3DS, Mobile, and More

Reduction of Legal Risk as Web Accessibility Business Case – Karl Groves

In this post, I’d like to discuss risk. Specifically, I’d like to focus on list of litigation, primarily because although I have previously outlined a number of factors that fall under the umbrella of “risk”, it is legal risk that most people tend to gravitate toward when discussing accessibility. This is especially true in the United States, which is where the overwhelming majority of web accessibility-related litigation has been seen. In short, the argument goes, if your site is inaccessible you can get sued and lose a bunch of money.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Reduction of Legal Risk as Web Accessibility Business Case – Karl Groves

Being a deaf developer

I’ve been deaf since infancy. It is not profound; my hearing loss is described as moderate to severe and is mostly problematic at higher frequency ranges, the range at which most human speech happens.

I rely on lip-reading and identifying vowel patterns to understand spoken language. Particular struggles are:recognising consonants, especially sibilants and unvoiced consonants (all consonants are high frequency sounds, and the unvoiced and sibilant consonants don’t activate the vocal chords)the beginning of sentencesthe end of sentencesSome deaf people successfully become programmers. It’s mostly thought-based, often solitary work, where all your output is written down.

Specifications and bugs come to you (in an ideal world, at least) on paper and in ticketing systems instead of through other people’s noiseholes. Some areas aren’t quite so fabulous (I’m looking at you, interminable conference call meetings involving 15 people sitting in a circle around a gigantic table), but adjustments are always possible.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Being a deaf developer

Resources for creating 508-compliant content – Web Accessibility Group

Our goal is to share and discuss strategies, techniques and resources for meeting Section 508 compliance as it pertains to websites and web-based content. WAG also endorses conformance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 and provides accessibility training on both Section 508 and WCAG 2.0

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Resources for creating 508-compliant content – Web Accessibility Group

Make your single page apps work with screen readers | Web design | Creative Bloq

Single-page apps pose a significant accessibility challenge when it comes to communicating view changes. Without a page refresh, screen readers do not pick up these important UI changes, leaving vision-impaired users confused and unaware.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Make your single page apps work with screen readers | Web design | Creative Bloq