Monthly Archives: April 2016

Twitter Adds Alt-Text Image Descriptions to Extend Tweet Accessibility

At last year’s Twitter Flight developer conference, CEO Jack Dorsey, as part of a wider effort to mend bridges with the developer community, called for ideas for updates to the service. The fourth most requested feature was providing the ability to add alternative text for images, enabling better functionality for people who are visually impaired.

Twitter’s now actioned that request – from today, people using both the iOS and Android versions of the Twitter app will be able to add descriptions of up to 420 characters to images within Tweets.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Twitter Adds Alt-Text Image Descriptions to Extend Tweet Accessibility | Social Media Today

Facebook Automated Captions Improve Accessibility, Provide Additional Insights | Social Media Today

… Facebook announced the release of automatic alternative text – or automatic alt text – for images posted to Facebook. Automatic alt text uses object recognition technology to generate a description of a photo, processing each through Facebook’s artificial intelligence engine to establish image content.

At the time of launch, the team has focused the system on recognizing approximately 100 different concepts based on their prominence in Facebook photos as well as the accuracy of the visual recognition engine. “The current concepts, for example, cover people’s appearance (e.g., baby, eyeglasses, beard, smiling, jewelry), nature (outdoor, mountain, snow, sky), transportation (car, boat, airplane, bicycle), sports (tennis, swimming, stadium, baseball), and food (ice cream, pizza, dessert, coffee). And settings provided different sets of information about the image, including people (e.g., people count, smiling, child, baby), objects (car, building, tree, cloud, food), settings (inside restaurant, outdoor, nature), and other image properties (text, selfie, close-up).” Based on these parameters, the system’s able to provide highly accurate image results.

See more at: http://www.socialmediatoday.com/social-networks/facebook-automated-captions-improve-accessibility-provide-additional-insights#sthash.joOC9qvd.dpuf

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Facebook Automated Captions Improve Accessibility, Provide Additional Insights | Social Media Today

See the New Lego Set That Has Disability Advocates Cheering | TakePart

From mythical characters, such as a werewolf or vampire, to more realistic ones, such as a cheerleader waving her pom-poms or a female scientist, Lego figures have long been a staple of kid toy boxes and a hot property among adult collectors. But out of the hundreds of small, one-and-one-half-inch-tall plastic figures produced by Lego over the years, none have reflected the experience of the 150 million disabled kids around the world.Now a series of photos from this week’s Nuremberg Toy Fair confirms that this lack of representation is changing. According to pictures German Lego fan website Promobricks posted on Tuesday, one of the new figures being released in 2016 is a character in a wheelchair with an assistance dog. The character was first hinted at during the London Toy Fair last weekend, according to the blog The Brick Fan. Now this visual evidence at the fair in Germany has parents and disability advocates celebrating.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: See the New Lego Set That Has Disability Advocates Cheering | TakePart

Australia’s first disability-focused tech accelerator launched | Media Access Australia

Australia’s first disability-focused impact accelerator, Remarkable, held its official launch event on 31 March at the University of Sydney. The Remarkable Accelerator program aims to work with inclusive start-up companies by using technology in innovative ways to improve the lives of people with disabilities.

Remarkable, a division of the Cerebral Palsy Alliance and powered by the Telstra Foundation and Department of Family and Community Services, began its first accelerator on 6 April with initial participants receiving a $20,000 grant towards masterclass training, access to an extensive mentor network and user testing support. Over the course of 16 weeks, participants are working towards creating and releasing their innovative technology solutions for people living with a disability.

Regarding the rapid advancement of technology and its importance for people with disabilities, Remarkable has stated:“Now is the perfect time to see innovation in the disability sector – the advent of NDIS, access to cheaper technologies and a burgeoning impact investment scene.

Source: Australia’s first disability-focused tech accelerator launched | Media Access Australia

Making Meetings Accessible

The Basics

  • Introductions:When being introduced to people who have vision loss, say hello and wait for them to offer their hand to be shaken. When introducing yourself, simply say something like “Hi, my name is Kevin Jones. Great to meet you. Let’s shake hands.”
  • A Note About Guide Dogs:Do not pet a guide dog in harness, as tempting as this may be! Guide dogs are working animals and distracting them can be hazardous for the people they are guiding.

Before a Seminar:

If possible, find out before the meeting which format participants with vision loss prefer to read (large print, braille, electronic text, audio CD, etc.) and have all materials for the meeting available in that format.

During the seminar:

  • Introductions:Have everyone at the table introduce themselves, in the order they are seated, so that people with vision loss know who is at the table and where.
  • Written Material:Be prepared to read aloud any written information not made available in alternative formats, such as PowerPoint presentations. Read in a normal speaking voice, at a normal pace, without skipping any information.

Afterwards

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at CNIB

UPDATED: WVU opens gender neutral bathrooms, ignores handicap accessibility

West Virginia University (WVU) celebrated the grand opening of two state-of-the-art gender neutral bathrooms Thursday, in an effort to preserve its commitment to diversity and “remain a national leader in progression and inclusion.” However, the school has failed to remain inclusive for for its students who are handicapped.

Some students at WVU, however, think the new gender neutral bathrooms are a snub to handicapped students whose demands for handicap-accessible bathrooms have been placed on the diversity backburner. Amanda Hutchison, one of two students in a manual wheelchair on campus, told Campus Reformshe has been advocating for Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) rights since she started at WVU, but the administration has mostly ignored her requests.

“The university’s response is very slow compared to the gender neutral bathroom advocates, she said. “They rallied and got enough people to where the university did not really have a choice.”

Hutchison did note that the university established an ADA committee in 2013 after she initially brought her concerns to the attention of administration. Since then, the university hired an ADA director as well but his position was placed under the supervision of the school’s diversity office, which focuses most of its energy on issues of race and gender.

The university has a scarce number of handicap “accessible” bathrooms and the ones it does have, according to Hutchison, do not meet ADA standards. The few accessible bathrooms were “not correctly built to where you can get a wheelchair to turn in them,” Hutchison said. “Basically they thought throwing a grab bar on the wall meant it was accessible.”

“Someone with gender identification needs can at least get into a bathroom.”

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: UPDATED: WVU opens gender neutral bathrooms, ignores handicap accessibility

How to make Font Awesome Accessible

If you use Font Awesome to link to your social media pages then you need to ensure that they are accessible to screen readers by adding anchor text.

If you use Font Awesome to link to your social media pages then you need to ensure that they are accessible to screen readers by adding anchor text. If you don’t then you have empty link errors when you test for accessibility with WAVE (Web Accessibility Evaluation Tool) and blind users will have no idea where the links go.

Anchor text is clickable text in a hyperlink that describes the link such as  <a href=”http://www.example.com”>Example Anchor Text</a> but when you are using an icon font as a link, you don’t really want to have anchor text displayed as well:

Dennis Lembrée (@dennisl) says


You should add aria-hidden=true to the icon span so screen readers don’t read the character that’s used for the font icon. This is the technique used on EasyChirp dot com, a web-accessible Twitter app.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How to make Font Awesome Accessible

Are you wasting your time creating an accessible PDF?

The collective knowledge around the creation of accessible PDFs is slowly but surely growing, making this flexible format more widely available to people of all abilities.

But what if you make your PDF accessible, yet someone still finds it inaccessible because of the way they open it?PDF button on a computer keyboard

In a nutshell, a PDF creator will add heading structure, alt text images, tag table heading cells and check the colour contrasts. The resulting tagged PDF is uploaded to a website and the job’s done. But one of the forgotten keys to a PDF’s accessibility lies in what happens next.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Are you wasting your time creating an accessible PDF?

Website Accessibility For Information Architects – Part 1

This post is the first in a two-part series about Accessibility and Information Architecture by Deque Director of Consulting Methodology & Quality, Glenda Sims…

Information architecture (IA) is the blueprint for web design. The purpose of information architecture is to analyze, organize, and label information on websites so that real people (not involved with the design and development of the site) can actually find what they need. So what does IA have to do with accessibility? Let’s listen to what users say about sites built on purposeful information architecture versus weak information architecture:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Website Accessibility For Information Architects | WCAG 2.0 | Deque