Monthly Archives: May 2016

Accessibility Update for Windows 10 Mail – Microsoft Accessibility Blog – Site Home – MSDN Blogs

Narrator, the screen reader built into Windows 10, currently provides the most complete experience when using Mail. We are working closely with the Microsoft UI Automation (UIA) team to continue improving both Mail and the platform. We know that many of you are using other screen readers, and we are also working with the developers of other screen readers and assistive technology vendors to improve the Mail experience here as well.

Recent Improvements

We are excited about the flexibility you have to update Mail frequently via the Microsoft Store. Since the initial release of Windows 10 last summer, we have made many improvements to the accessibility of the Mail app. Here are some of the updates we have made since we first shipped:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility Update for Windows 10 Mail – Microsoft Accessibility Blog – Site Home – MSDN Blogs

10 Apps That Are Designed For Mobile Accessibility – ARC

Mobile accessibility was one of the hot topics in 2015, especially when considering the fact that there are currently no hard guidelines for developers to follow when it comes to building apps that are accessible to all.

Mobile and Web accessibility has become more of a priority for some companies, especially when you take into account the legal ramifications of not having an accessible website or app but there are signs that the landscape is slowly changing.

… the following list showcases a few of the apps that have caught ARC’s roving eye. It should be noted that this list is only a taste of what is out there and is a quick guide to some of the apps that are accessibility-centric.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 10 Apps That Are Designed For Mobile Accessibility – ARC – ARC

How to Create Accessibility Shortcut on iOS Devices? – Wikigain

In this article, I am going to show you how to create accessibility shortcut on iOS devices.

apple made many features in accessibility for using the device is a better way. for example, if your device buttons get damaged, so do worry you can still use it, just by enabling assistiveTouch.

and many feature including reduce motion, increase contrast, button shapes, labels, switch control and many more are available at accessibility features.

Accessibility Shortcut lets you quickly turn accessibility features on and off by triple-clicking on your Home button. apple until now, just created the shortcuts for the flowing features. we hope that it will be more as soon as possible.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How to Create Accessibility Shortcut on iOS Devices? – Wikigain

Blind Arduino Blog: Arduino Setup and Accessibility Tips for Windows

In a world of talking iPhones, sexy accessibility announcements, and high-quality open-source screen readers, the naive sighted person could be forgiven for assuming that we have finally reached the point where a blind person could simply download and use the same exact software tools as everyone else for any given problem.

Blind people know that it is rarely that simple. There are a wide variety of issues that still stand as barriers to equal access in all sorts of situations, and Arduino development on Windows is no exception.

While it is definitely possible to set up an accessible development environment for Arduino on Windows, many of the steps may not be immediately obvious, especially to the beginner.

This post is intended to streamline the Arduino setup process, flagging accessibility work-arounds, and providing a step-by-step guide to setting up the tools you’ll need for Arduino development as a blind maker.

If you are just getting started and don’t know anything about Windows, software development, accessibility, or Arduino, this blog is probably not the best place to start. This article assumes you’re already comfortable with Windows and your screen reader, and that you know what Arduino is and have some motivation to make things with it.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Blind Arduino Blog: Arduino Setup and Accessibility Tips for Windows

When it comes to accessibility, Apple continues to lead in awareness and innovation

…a strong argument can be made that Apple has also led a software revolution equally as transformative but without nearly the bang in terms of press coverage. With iOS, Apple has created a rich and diverse set of tools for people with disabilities that enable them to use an iPhone with as much ease and delight as their non-disabled peers.

It’s for this reason the accessibility features on iOS are widely regarded as the best in the industry. This is no small feat, one that shouldn’t be overlooked, especially if you remember what cell phones were like before the iPhone came along.

Consider someone with low vision. He or she may have struggled to use a “dumbphone” with a display the size of a postage stamp, and a Multi-tap keyboard. But then they buy an iPhone, and their whole world changes. They now have a phone with a touchscreen and tech like Zoom, features which make it easier to use the device.

Suddenly, they’re texting with family and friends, looking up directions, and more with a fluidity like never before. Thus, it isn’t hyperbole to say iOS’s accessibility features have been every bit as game-changing for the disabled as the iPhone was to the mass phone market.

The company’s investment in this area is emblematic of its ethos to make products for everyone; it’s also a prime example of Tim Cook’s oft-repeated mantra that Apple strives to create products that “enrich people’s lives.”

The accessibility software on all of Apple’s platforms empower those with disabilities, myself included, to partake in the experience Apple intends for all users. Put another way, Apple products are inclusive by design.

“We see accessibility as a basic human right,” said Sarah Herrlinger, Senior Manager for Global Accessibility Policy and Initiatives at Apple.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source:
When it comes to accessibility, Apple continues to lead in awareness and innovation

Being a deaf developer

… Some deaf people successfully become programmers. It’s mostly thought-based, often solitary work, where all your output is written down. Specifications and bugs come to you (in an ideal world, at least) on paper and in ticketing systems instead of through other people’s noiseholes. Some areas aren’t quite so fabulous (I’m looking at you, interminable conference call meetings involving 15 people sitting in a circle around a gigantic table), but adjustments are always possible.

The stereotype of a programmer as a solitary eccentric who’s allergic to human company is unfair and inaccurate. As a group, we’re a very social bunch. We write blogs, we speak at conferences, we produce tutorials, we mentor. This isn’t new, either – it’s an atmosphere that dates from before the earliest days of the internet at Bell Labs, or MIT, and scores of other R&D orgs. I love this social world of code, as being able to surround yourself with competent, enthusiastic individuals is a big part of becoming a better developer yourself. But one thing that I’ve always felt shut out of is pair programming.

Pair programming, in principle, is great – it’s like Rubber Duck debugging on steroids.

So it was great to get the opportunity to pair with Rowan Manning on the Pa11y project, the automated accessibility testing tool built for Nature. Using Screenhero to set up a remote pairing session meant that we could both look at the screen and use text to communicate, losing no information and generating no confusion.

This was the first time I’ve done a pairing session that worked as it should. It’s difficult to express what a difference this makes as I think most hearing people find it hard to appreciate how much information loss occurs in general conversation with a deaf person. Imagine that in your city that all the books you’ve ever read have had ~60% of the words in them randomly blanked out with a Sharpie. Then imagine going on holiday to a neighbouring city where (mercifully) nobody does that and you can suddenly read an entire book without needing to guess at anything. It’s a bit like that.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Being a deaf developer

Web Accessibility Perspectives Videos: Explore the Impact and Benefits for Everyone

Excellent new resource from WAI — videos that show web ‪#‎accessibility‬ is essential for some, useful for all.

Web accessibility is essential for people with disabilities and useful for all.

Learn about the impact of accessibility and the benefits for everyone in a variety of situations…

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Web Accessibility Perspectives Videos: Explore the Impact and Benefits for Everyone

WordPress Accessibility Team Seeks Testers Using Speech Recognition Technology

Rian Rietveld and the Accessibility team are working to improve the experience of using WordPress with speech recognition software, such asDragon Naturally Speaking (widely considered as one of the best for desktop use.) In particular, the task of adding media to a post has a number of obstacles that make it nearly impossible for those using speech recognition software.

Rietveld posted three tests to the Accessibility team’s blog today, inviting those who use Dragon Naturally Speaking or other assistive technology to help the contributors determine the roadblocks that need to be removed for adding media. These tests include actions like adding media, editing attachment details, and creating a gallery.

If you use WordPress with assistive technology for speech recognition, completing these tests and offering your feedback is one way to get involved as a contributor.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: WordPress Accessibility Team Seeks Testers Using Speech Recognition Technology