Monthly Archives: June 2016

Why accessibility is good for business (according to my mechanic) » Simply Accessible

I was lucky to find my mechanic, Pete. There was only one problem. A single, 6” step that stood between my wheelchair and his garage.

There was only one problem.

A single, 6” step that stood between my wheelchair and Pete’s office. Most people wouldn’t even notice, but it was enough of a hindrance that I couldn’t get into the garage.

Each time I needed to have work done on my car, I’d have to call ahead and make sure Pete or one of his employees could meet me in the yard to discuss the issues with my car, get the keys, or arrange payment.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Why accessibility is good for business (according to my mechanic) » Simply Accessible

On Smells and Colors — Medium

When I was six years old, or so, I told someone that I didn’t have a sense of smell. It was my mother, and she didn’t believe me. I don’t hold this against her in the least. It was the 1970s, and we had a different attitude toward those sorts of things.

Also, I was six, and made a lot of stuff up.

It’s not that hard to live without a sense of smell, but not a day goes by when I don’t think about it. Living with two little boys, I’m bombarded with fart jokes, and that’s the least of it. If you think it’s

easy, though, you’ve probably never imagined being anosmic. That is, not having a sense of smell. The truth is that anosmics know we’re missing out on something, but haven’t the foggiest idea of what it is.

Lacking one of the five senses as a kid, I had to come up with coping strategies.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: On Smells and Colors — Medium

Weddings and Wheels – New Mobility

When planning your wedding, the most important part is finding ceremony and reception venues that fit your style and budget — and for wheelchair users, accessibility is another box to tick off. Trending venue options include getting married outdoors on farms or beaches, in warehouses or barns, or at poolsides. And as young wheelers make their way on their big day, some are opting for traditional wheels, while others use innovations that can include elevating chairs or standing frames, or in one couple’s case, a harness for jumping out of a helicopter.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Weddings and Wheels – New Mobility

Claiming Crip: Accessibility Is Not “A Nice Thing To Do”

The truth is, accessibility is not “a nice thing to do”. Accessibility is a necessity. Even more than that accessibility is a right. When we frame access and accessibility as “a nice thing to do” it becomes an act of charity, and even an afterthought. When we talk about accessibility as an act of kindness or a nicety we eliminate its absolute necessity. It is absolutely nice for a stranger to shovel a curb cut to help somebody out, but the actual act of having a clear curb cut to use is so much more than a nice thing, it is an absolute requirement for many disabled people to go about living their daily lives. Without shoveled curb cuts I would not be able to get to work. Without shoveled curb cuts I would not even be able to leave my apartment complex.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Claiming Crip: Accessibility Is Not “A Nice Thing To Do”

Contrast Ratio: Easily calculate color contrast ratios. Passing WCAG was never this easy!

The simplest, easiest tool for quickly finding good contrast:

 

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As you type, the contrast ratio indicated will update. Hover over the circle to get more detailed information. When semi-transparent colors are involved as backgrounds, the contrast ratio will have an error margin, to account for the different colors they may be over.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Contrast Ratio: Easily calculate color contrast ratios. Passing WCAG was never this easy!

Apple asks FCC to recognize Made For iPhone hearing aids to encourage accessibility innovation | 9to5Mac

Apple recently has filed a new document with the Federal Communications Commission in which it argues that Made for iPhone, or MFi, accessories should be acknowledged by the organization as alternatives for hearing aid compatibility compliance. Recently, the FCC has proposed that all phones and consumer wireless devices must be compatible with hearing aids. In response to the new proposal from the FCC, Apple says that all products that fall under its MFi hearing aid standards already comply with the FCC’s hearing aid compliance regulations. Apple argues that Made for iPhone hearing aids are already available to consumers everywhere, thus making them a valid alternative to the hearing aid compatibility requirement (via MacReports).

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Apple asks FCC to recognize Made For iPhone hearing aids to encourage accessibility innovation | 9to5Mac

Why Motor Impaired Users Need Skip Links – UX Movement

There are a variety of motor disabilities they could have that would limit their ability to maneuver a mouse. Spinal cord injuries, damage to limbs and nerve diseases all make scrolling a burden. One way designers can combat this accessibility issue is by providing skip links.

Skip Links Minimize ScrollingLinks take users to a new page. Skip links scroll users to a new section on the current page. They won’t have to rely as much on flicking their mousewheel or dragging the scrollbar. This allows motor impaired users to browse the page with minimal scrolling.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Why Motor Impaired Users Need Skip Links – UX Movement

WebAIM: Keyboard Accessibility

Keyboard accessibility is one of the most important aspects of web accessibility. Many users with motor disabilities rely on a keyboard. Blind users also typically use a keyboard for navigation. Some people have tremors which don’t allow for fine muscle control. Others have little or no use of their hands. Some people simply do not have hands, whether due to a birth defect, an accident, or amputation. In addition to traditional keyboards, some users may use modified keyboards or other hardware that mimics the functionality of a keyboard.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: WebAIM: Keyboard Accessibility