Monthly Archives: July 2016

Responses To The Screen Reader Strategy Survey | HeydonWorks

In September of last year, I decided I wanted to hear stories about how screen reader users access The Web. I suspected, as a sighted web user, I made a lot of incorrect assumptions. Accordingly, I composed seven questions to find out about strategies for reading and operation.Following are the raw, unedited responses (minus the occasional typo). I don’t want to editorialize, but let’s just say I learned a lot.

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Read full article at Source: Responses To The Screen Reader Strategy Survey | HeydonWorks

On Link Underlines | Adrian Roselli

It is amazing to me how this suggestion causes so much angst and fighting. Designers often argue that they look ugly, some users claim they are distracting, others even claim they reduce accessibility.

I’ve tried to gather some information here to allow you to make your own judgment, which may or may not end up matching mine. If you understand the resources I provide and still do not agree, that is fine. However, if you understand the resources I provide then I suspect you will at least style links in a way that makes them usable.Remember, this is for addressing how links are styled in the body of a page, the narrative content, where they sit among blocks of unlinked text. Not navigation, not footers, not page controls, etc.

Fair warning, this is a lengthy post. I’ve broken it into six sections:

Accessibility
Usability
Academic Research
Other Sites
Styling Options
Recommendation

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: On Link Underlines | Adrian Roselli

Newest Browsers Vivaldi and Brave Missing Key Feature

Two former big bosses of popular browsers are at it again, taking the helm of new browsers.

Brendan Eich, literal father of JavaScript, and former co-founder of Mozilla, has recently released Brave, a new browser aimed at increasing privacy and security for its users.

Similarly Jon von Tetzchner, former co-founder of the Opera Browser, just released his new browser Vivaldi, which is supposed to be made for power users, or users that expect a lot of customization. It is described as having so many features that extensions/ plugins are not required.

… Unfortunately, these browser are also not accessible to screen reader users. At least in my personal quick tests. If I am wrong, please correct me.

I tried both browsers with VoiceOver on MAC and with NVDA on Win 7. Other than announcing the window, not much else was possible in either.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Newest Browsers Vivaldi and Brave Missing Key Feature – Unfettered Thoughts

Evaluating Cognitive Web Accessibility with WAVE

WAVE is a web accessibility tool that can greatly assist in the evaluation of web content. Rather than providing a complex technical report, WAVE shows the original web page with embedded icons and indicators that reveal the accessibility of that page. Before proceeding, be sure to read the Help page for an overview of using WAVE and details on specific things you may encounter.

The following checklist outlines things you can do to evaluate and improve cognitive web accessibility. This checklist is broken into general areas of cognitive accessibility. Many of the items listed are things that you must check for yourself on the page. Some checkpoints may be difficult to measure or may not have a clear answer (for example, how do you tell if language is “simple”?). This checklist, however, should help you determine the general level of cognitive accessibility and can help you identify areas where improvements can be made. WAVE can facilitate evaluation of many of the checkpoints. WAVE icons that appear adjacent to a checkpoint indicate specific WAVE rules that can be of assistance to you. You can click on the icons to view details about that icon, why it might appear in your content, and what you can do to improve accessibility. If you see these icons in a WAVE report, pay particular attention to them because they likely indicate an aspect of the page that can affect cognitive accessibility.

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Read full article at Source: Evaluating Cognitive Web Accessibility with WAVE

The importance of manual testing alongside automated accessibility tools

There are many free and paid automated tools available to help you identify accessibility issues in your websites, apps and digital channels. Automatic accessibility checking tools are useful to broadly identify problems and start developing a plan to fix them, and engaging human experts throughout this process is important to achieve the best result. Here’s our reasons why manual testing by accessibility professionals alongside automatic tools is necessary to ensure your digital products are as accessible as possible.

Conclusion

Automated tools are useful to determine accessibility problems in a digital platform and are great for providing developers, designers and content authors with an insight on issues to fix. Without expert knowledge of accessibility and W3C guideline compliance, it can be difficult to know where to start. Media Access Australia can help you understand these tools and provide knowledge, consultancy and expert advice to maximise their use, leading to education for your team and the most accessible results for people who engage with your digital content.

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Read full article at Source: The importance of manual testing alongside automated accessibility tools – Media Access Australia

Learning Is For Everyone: Instructional Design For Accessibility (Free Technical Article!) – eLearning Industry

Instructional Design For Accessibility: How To Ensure That Learning Is For Everyone Designing eLearning that is accessible for people with disabilities isn’t easy. The key is to find ways in which basic principles of good web design, along with the principles of Universal Design, can improve access to and the experience of eLearning for all learners, regardless of ability. In Learning Is For Everyone: Instructional Design For Accessibility free technical article, Obsidian Learning examines several importa

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Read full article at Source: Learning Is For Everyone: Instructional Design For Accessibility (Free Technical Article!) – eLearning Industry