Part 2: How to Conduct a Basic Accessibility Audit on Your Site : Adobe Team

Continued from Part 1.

Part 2: How to Conduct a Basic Accessibility Audit on Your Site

In case you missed it, catch up on Part 1 of How to Conduct a Basic Accessibility Audit on Your Site.

In this post, we are going to learn how to do keyboard, screen reader and automated code testing.

Testing with a keyboardUnderstanding how people might be using your site with assistive technology is a great way to gain empathy and insight into the impacts of poor accessibility.

Remember that some people may not be able (or not want to!) use a mouse, due to motor impairments or personal preferences. Navigating by keyboard takes some practice. The basics are:The tab key moves forward through interactive elements on the page and shift tab moves backwards.Using the enter key should select a link or button.The arrow keys should navigate within dropdowns.

The space bar works with form controls for example checking or unchecking a checkbox.Gov.uk has a skip to main content link and a clear visual focus state when using a keyboard.

To run a keyboard test on your site:Go to your site.

Unplug your mouse – you are not allowed to use it. No cheating!

Hit the tab key to get started.

Do interactive elements have the same functionality as they do when using a mouse?

Is the order of the focus states logical?

As you get the hang of keyboard navigation, you will learn how important the order of focus states is, as well as discovering interactive elements which don’t function well. A common problem is a ‘keyboard trap’ – where you cannot move away from an interactive element using the keyboard alone.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Part 2: How to Conduct a Basic Accessibility Audit on Your Site : Adobe Dreamweaver Team Blog

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