Monthly Archives: August 2016

Using the fieldset and legend elements | Accessibility

Using the right HTML elements when implementing forms is essential to ensure they can be used by as many people as possible including screen reader users. In this blog Léonie explains the correct usage of the fieldset and legend elements. On GOV.UK we often use groups of related form fields, like a set of radio buttons or checkboxes. These related fields might be used to offer multiple answers to a single question, or to ask for multiple pieces of information about the same thing.

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Read full article at Source: Using the fieldset and legend elements | Accessibility

Windows 10 upgrade for assistive technology users

For the general public, the free upgrade offer to Windows 10 ends on 29 July. However, if you use assistive technologies, you can still get the free upgrade offer even after the general public deadline expires, as Microsoft continues our efforts to improve the Windows 10 experience for people who use these technologies.

With the Windows 10 Anniversary Update, we’ve taken a number of steps to improve the accessibility of Windows 10 accessibility. To learn more, read our blog that details some of these improve

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Web Accessibility Lessons from Blind and Low Vision Users — Medium

Approximately 10% of US citizens are blind or have some degree of vision loss.

At TransitScreen we are exploring ways to make our digital signage more accessible to blind and low vision (BLV) users. Our work on this project has just begun, but we already learned some important lessons that we wanted to share.

Good code = accessible

Too often accessibility is thought of as extra work to be done after a site is finished. But in reality well-written HTML is already accessible by default, so the majority of the “work” simply involves knowing how to use it correctly and complying with standards.

  • Use semantic markup appropriately by choosing the tag that best describes the content it contains.

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Read full article at Source: Web Accessibility Lessons from Blind and Low Vision Users — Medium

Dev.Opera — Accessible Drag and Drop Using WAI-ARIA

This article is intended for people who create rich internet applications with drag and drop functionality and want to make them accessible.

No prior knowledge of WAI-ARIA is assumed, although it is recommended you read my introduction to WAI-ARIA article before starting this article. A basic knowledge of scripting is assumed, and is necessary to understand exactly what is going on in the code example, but this knowledge is not necessary to understand the basic concepts discussed.

After reading this article you will have an understanding of how to structure applications with drag and drop functionality so they are accessible.The term drag and drop infers using a mouse to move an object from one location to another.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Dev.Opera — Accessible Drag and Drop Using WAI-ARIA

Effectively including accessibility into web developer training – Karl Groves

…Today, I’d like to follow “Your computer school sucks” with some actual guidance for web developer training schools and bootcamps.

Do not treat accessibility as its own topic

A few years ago, I wrote a series of blog posts under the theme Selling Accessibility. The content for many of those posts was driven by interviews I did with a number of people in the accessibility field, one of whom was Cher Travis-Ellis from CSU Fresno. Higher Education has some unique challenges when it comes to online accessibility, especially when it comes to the amount of content being created and the large numbers of non-technical people who create that content. During our discussions, Cher shared with me a neat trick she used when training CSU Fresno staff on accessible content creation: add the accessibility training to all the other training. Unless there’s a really specific technique that deals only with accessibility, nobody really needs to know that you’re teaching them how to make something accessible. For instance, if you’re teaching someone how to use MS Word and you talk about using actual headings instead of bolded text, the accessibility aspect of that practice doesn’t really matter. In other words, you’re teaching people how to do a good job, anyway. The same thing goes for web development. Many accessibility best practices are also just quality best practices. Teach people how to do a good job and, when it comes to techniques that are specific to accessibility, that should be in the core curriculum too.

Discuss the role of “markup” in Hypertext markup language

Discuss the Document Object Model, including Object-Oriented Principles like Abstraction, Inheritance, and Encapsulation

Discuss user input devices

Discuss quality

Discuss basic user expectations, including predictability of the interface

Expect More

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Read full article at Source: Effectively including accessibility into web developer training – Karl Groves

Airline Web Accessibility: Post US DOT Deadline Round Up

Round the world in 8 Days We are pleased to say we can conclude our round the world airline accessibility review, having looked at the six airlines (one from each continent) to see how they have approached the new US … Continued

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Read full article at Source: Airline Web Accessibility: Post US DOT Deadline Round Up – User Vision

In Plain Sight — Shopify UX — 1

In Plain Sight: Text, Contrast, and Accessibility

This is the first post in a series on accessibility from Shopify UX’s team. We’re publishing posts every two weeks. You can check out the introduction here.

Contrast is one of the basic elements of graphic design. It lets us tell things apart. Yet in UI design, at least for the web, there is a perpetual temptation to skimp. Things tend towards gray-on-gray.

Especially when it comes to text, having enough contrast is essential. This isn’t just an aesthetic matter. We want everyone to be able to comfortably read the text on our sites and apps. It’s also worth remembering the world isn’t divided into those with perfect vision and those with disabilities. Eyesight differs across a wide range among the general population. Many of us wear glasses, and everyone’s vision worsens as we age. (That reminds me: I probably need a new prescription.)

Now that I’ve reminded you it’s important, what is contrast, exactly? Essentially, it’s the perceived difference between two colors. Mind blown, right? Okay, bear with me, because there are several aspects of color that contribute to this perception. The main one is the difference in lightness (also known as luminance) between those colors. In addition to luminance, other aspects of color also make a difference to contrast. Keep this in mind, as I’ll explore this in greater detail later.

Practically then, how do we ensure our text has enough contrast on screens? It might seem simple: use dark enough text. End of story. But that’s only true if contrast is our only consideration: there are cases where other solid, usability-based concerns conflict with ideal contrast requirements. Getting text contrast right is harder than it seems. The good news is that a few simple rules of thumb can take us a long way. When we run into more complex scenarios, a deeper understanding of the issues can help point us in the right direction.

Source: In Plain Sight — Shopify UX — Medium