Monthly Archives: August 2016

How to implement SVG icons | Creative Bloq

Web developer Shehzad Azram shows how SVG icons could help solve accessibility issues, and reveals how to implement one.

Things have come a long way from the days when we used plain vector art images as icons. Yet there are still a number of accessibility issues when it comes to icons. Thankfully, SVGs could go a long way towards addressing this problem.In this article, I’ll take you through the different icon options we have used in the past, then explore the benefits (and drawbacks) of SVG icons. Finally, I’ll explain how to implement SVG icons, using automation tools to reduce the workload.

While SVG has been around since the last century, it took over a decade for Internet Explorer to catch up with v9. With the rapid decline of legacy IE usage, SVG is now a viable solution across the vast majority of browsers and devices.

There are still some older browsers that do not support SVG icons, but there are tricks to get around this. So why should we use them over font icons? SVGs, like font icons, are vector-based.

SVG icons
How font icons appear when a font fails to render

Unlike font icons, you don’t have to use workarounds to make them accessible: they already contain semantic title and description attributes. They scale to any size without losing detail, so look great on HDPI displays.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How to implement SVG icons | Creative Bloq

We’re Just Temporarily Abled : Designing for the Future : Designing for the Future

We aren’t just designing accessible products and websites for a subgroup of people who we may or may not know, who have permanent visual or motor issues. We’re designing these sites and products for our future selves as well.

A few years ago, I had the opportunity to attend and present at a great conference where Cindy Li delivered a phenomenal keynote.I learned about 8 million new things during her talk, but she made one particular statement that really stuck with me.

She simply said,“We’re all just temporarily abled.”

She talked a little bit about her mother who has an ocular disease that is slowly blinding her over time. Then she mentioned that while she doesn’t have an ocular disease herself, she is beginning to require stronger glasses prescriptions each year.

Why am I talking about Cindy’s eye health? Because she then pointed out that as designers we need to design for accessibility, not only for folks who are permanently visually or hearing impaired or have severe motor issues right now, but also for our future selves.

Design for the future you.

With each passing birthday, our vision is starting to go. Eventually our hearing will start to go and so will our mobility. I will have these issues, you will have these issues–they’re just part of the aging process.We aren’t just designing accessible products and websites for a subgroup of people who we may or may not know, who have permanent visual or motor issues. We’re designing these sites and products for our future selves as well.The next time you’re tempted to brush off accessibility while you’re working on a design, picture yourself in 20 or 30 years trying to use your own website or product. It’s a pretty life changing shift in thinking. I like to call it “forced empathy.”

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: We’re Just Temporarily Abled : Designing for the Future : Designing for the Future | UX Magazine

Danger! Testing Accessibility with real people — Medium

As four people who are blind and care deeply about making the web more accessible, we strongly believe user testing should include people with disabilities. But when the results are misinterpreted, it can be dangerous. It can foster action that appears to benefit people with disabilities but ultimately do as much harm as good.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Danger! Testing Accessibility with real people — Medium

Event Websites Need to Have Accessibility Info – Scrappy Deviation

I’ve done a few reviews of events now, and I intend to do more in the future. Some have focused specifically on accessibility issues, while others have included them along with other discussions of the events.

On both of the event reviews I have done on The Orbit I noted that the events DID have a harassment policy on those sites, which were easy to find. This is likely because social justice communities have demanded harassment policies for years and many well known people will not speak at events that do not have those polices highly visible on their websites.

Attendees need accessibility information.

Neither event had accessibility information on their websites. To be blunt, I want this to become as unacceptable as having no harassment policy.

So what should a small event include on their website?

The most important thing is to be honest. If someone is told the event they’re attending is wheelchair accessible, but they arrive and find steps leading to the entrance, they’re going to have a bad time. So be as honest as you reasonably can about barriers that may exist for people, while still working to remove any barriers you can.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Event Websites Need to Have Accessibility Info – Scrappy Deviation

Census 2016 – Accessibility and special needs | Australian Bureau of Statistics

What help is available for people with a disability, illness or injury?

If you need assistance completing your Census form, we encourage you to seek help from someone you trust. This could be a family member, friend, carer or neighbour. In some locations, such as hospitals and nursing homes, Field Officers will be employed to help complete the form.Information collected in the Census helps to determine funding and plan for better health facilities for both patients and carers across Australia.

Information to help people who are deaf or hard of hearing to participate in the Census is available in Australian Sign Language (Auslan) and Close Captioned.

This video provides information on how to complete each Census question in Auslan.

2016 Census in Auslan

Those with hearing or speech impairments requiring help to complete the Census form, please contact the National Relay Service.

Curated by (Lifekludger) for further detail
Read full article at Source: Accessibility and special needs | Census | Australian Bureau of Statistics

Accessible SVGs | CSS-Tricks

An excellent, fully detailed article on making SVG graphics accessible.

Scalable Vector Graphic (SVG) is emerging as the preferred graphic format to use on the web today. Are you abandoning the icon font or replacing old pg, gif and png graphics for the well-supported SVG, too? Let’s see how this will impact users of assistive technology (AT) and what is needed in order to ensure a great user experience for everyone.

…Source: Accessible SVGs | CSS-Tricks

Universal design for organisations – digital accessibility video – MAA

Through an alliance with Australian Network on Disability (AND), Media Access Australia (MAA) contributed and helped organise the digital accessibility stream of AND’s annual conference, which was held in Sydney on 17 May 2016.

Presentation video

https://youtu.be/kCaRJCAxrNY

Presentation video transcriptRather than hear from Media Access Australia about our services and approach to managing digital accessibility with AND members, we believed that the best engagement for the audience would be achieved by hearing directly from another member.

Natalie Collins, Deputy CEO at MAA was the session facilitator and shared the stage with Sarah Abbott, the Senior Manager, Group Diversity and Inclusion, at Commonwealth Bank.

Sarah outlined the strategies and approaches that they took to gain cut-through, influence, and improve digital accessibility across the organisation, and how universal design principles are changing the way digital services meet the needs of users.

Source: Videos – Media Access Australia

Making images accessible for people on Twitter | Twitter Help Center

Making images accessible for people on Twitter

When you Tweet photos using the Twitter app for iOS or Android, you have the option to compose a description of the images so the content is accessible to people who are visually impaired.

This article includes information about how to enable the Compose image descriptions setting and instructions for composing image descriptions using:

Twitter for iOS
Twitter for Android
VoiceOver on Twitter for iOS
Talkback on Twitter for Android

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Making images accessible for people on Twitter | Twitter Help Center