Monthly Archives: September 2016

Designing Perfect Text Field: Clarity, Accessibility and User Effort

Designing Perfect Text Field: Clarity, Accessibility and User Effort04 AUGUST 2016 on UX, Design, UI

For any app or web application, nothing will ever happen without some initial and ongoing input from the user. It is, therefore, critical that product designers, developer and product managers understand the best ways to allow them to do so.

In this article we’ll examine key factors that improve data input by focusing on text fields. Keep in mind that these are general guideline and there are exceptions to every rule.

A text field is a basic text control that enables the user to type a small amount of text. No matter what app you use, you’re bound to run across some little text field requiring your personal information. Even typing a question into Google is considered filling out a form which has only one text field.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Designing Perfect Text Field: Clarity, Accessibility and User Effort

We’re just temporarily abled: Designing for the future – InVision Blog

We need to design for accessibility not only for folks who are permanently visually impaired, hard of hearing, or have severe motor issues right now, but also for our future selves.

Design for the future you

With each passing birthday, our vision is starting to go. Eventually our hearing will start to go and so will our mobility. I will have these issues, you will have these issues—they’re just part of the aging process.

We aren’t just designing accessible products and websites for a subgroup of people who we may or may not know, who have permanent visual or motor issues. We’re designing these sites and products for our future selves as well.

The next time you’re tempted to brush off accessibility while you’re working on a design, picture yourself in 20 or 30 years trying to use your own website or product. It’s a pretty life-changing shift in thinking. I like to call it “forced empathy.”

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: We’re just temporarily abled: Designing for the future – InVision Blog

Advocate Moves Needle on Website Accessibility – Education Week

Every year, thousands of complaints flow into the office tasked with investigating disability discrimination for the U.S. Department of Education.

This year, Marcie Lipsitt, a special education advocate from Michigan, has been responsible for about 500 of those complaints—and counting.

Lipsitt’s focus is on the websites of school districts and other educational institutions, which she says widely disregard the needs of users who are blind or visually impaired, or who cannot use a mouse to navigate a page. Other website problems she has spotted include videos with no captions, or text and background color combinations that are a strain for people with low vision.

Her letters have gotten results. In June, the Education Department’s office for civil rights announced that it had entered into settlement agreements over website accessibility with schools, districts, and departments of education in seven states and in Guam.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Advocate Moves Needle on Website Accessibility – Education Week

iOS App VoiceOver Accessibility Teaching and Testing Plan | AppleVis

VoiceOver, a feature Apple has built into all iOS devices to enable Braille and speech access for users who are unable to see the screen, has revolutionized the lives of countless thousands of blind people around the world. It works best when apps are deliberately developed in ways that ensure compatibility with VoiceOver, blind people are considered during development and included in all facets of the testing process.

If you are a developer who has been asked to ensure the full VoiceOver accessibility of your app, following a step-by-step plan will help you get it right the first time, and keep getting it right through each subsequent update.

If you are an educator, following an organized plan will help you determine which iOS apps will best meet your blind students’ needs and effectively teach them how to use each new app they encounter throughout their studies and beyond.

If you are a blind person who is new to iOS, or you are an advanced user of many apps, following a coherent plan will help you quickly come up to speed with the built-in capabilities of your device and each new app you install.

The purpose of this step-by-step plan is to provide a straightforward way for advocates, developers, educators and others to quickly explore, learn and improve the accessibility of all apps in Apple’s iOS ecosystem.

TL;DR

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: iOS App VoiceOver Accessibility Teaching and Testing Plan | AppleVis