Monthly Archives: October 2016

3 steps to fulfill 80% standards with 20% effort


3 steps to fulfill 80% standards with 20% effort

Make your website usable with keyboard only: make sure that focus outline is visible all the time and user can determine which element is currently focusedno extra/unnecessary TAB stopsno tabstop traps (when you cannot get out of an element with the keyboard)

Implement smart focus management:
set focus on appropriate elements after user actions (e.g., when a user navigates to a page with a login form – set the focus on the login text field; in 90% of the cases the next user action will be entering the login)restore focus to appropriate elements after user actions (e.g., when a user closes a menu, focus should be restored to the element that was focused on before opening the menu)make tab order user-friendly (remove non-actionable and non-informative tab stops)

Make your website usable with screen reader:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Web Accessibility Hacker Way

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility | Accessibility | Posters

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility

Karwai Pun, 2 September 2016 — Design, User research

Karwai Pun is an interaction designer currently working on Service Optimisation to make existing and new services better for our users. Karwai is part of an accessibility group at Home Office Digital, leading on autism, and has created these dos and don’ts posters as a way of approaching accessibility from a design perspective.

Dos and don’ts

The dos and don’ts of designing for accessibility are general guidelines, best design practices for making our services accessible. Currently, we have six different posters in our series that cater to users from these areas: low vision, deaf and hard of hearing, dyslexia, those with motor disabilities, users on the autistic spectrum and users of screen readers.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility | Accessibility

Provide accessible images | Online Accessibility | harvard.edu

Provide accessible images

Images can be effective way to convey meaning, such as to provide additional information to text content or to assign labels to buttons. Text alternatives are vital for people who can’t see them. When icons are added as images, the best practice is the same as for providing alternative text for images. When other methods are used, such as background images or icon fonts, additional care is needed to ensure that their meanings are available to screen reader users, people with reading difficulties, and those who use Windows High Contrast Mode or who need to apply a user-defined style sheet that changes fonts.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Provide accessible images | Online Accessibility

Making Information Accessible – Dyslexia Friendly Style Guide

For people with dyslexia, the ability to read and understand text can be affected by the way in which text has been written and produced.

If you are producing information to be read by others, it is important to remember that up to 10% of your readers may have dyslexia.

Dyslexia friendly text will have improved readability and better visual impact for all readers, but especially those with dyslexia.

The following are some simple recommendations to help ensure that your text is dyslexia friendly:

 
Curated by (Lifekludger)
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Does Your Company Website Violate the ADA? Part 2-Top Ten Considerations for a Web Accessibility Policy

In Part I of this series, we discussed the uncertainty concerning whether the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to websites of private businesses, and, if so, the specific requirements that would apply to websites. Additionally, we discussed that even if under no legal obligation to do so, businesses need to be aware of the current status of the law concerning web accessibility. Below, we address why businesses should consider the adoption of a formal web accessibility policy and present the top 10 most important considerations affecting the components of a web accessibility policy.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Does Your Company Website Violate the ADA? Part 2-Top Ten Considerations for a Web Accessibility Policy – Lexology

Does Your Company Website Violate the ADA? Part 1

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is most commonly thought of as prohibiting workplace discrimination against individuals with disabilities and requiring the elimination of physical barriers to public locations.  But a recent wave of litigation presents a less obvious application of the ADA that may have a far broader impact: the potential application of the ADA to websites.  Before discussing the recent litigation, we briefly address two threshold questions (1) does the ADA apply to websites at all

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Read full article at Source: Does Your Company Website Violate the ADA? | Publications | Carlton Fields

PAVE 2.0: A New Generation of the Web Tool for PDF Accessibility 

The ICT-Accessibility Lab of the ZHAW, in collaboration with the Swiss Blind and Visually Impaired Association (SBV), has developed a web tool called PAVE which quickly and easily makes existing PDF documents accessible.

This is critical for allowing existing screen-reading programs to read the correct content. With PAVE 2.0, the existing web tool has been fundamentally revised and extended with a new paragraph detection feature.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: PAVE 2.0: A New Generation of the Web Tool for PDF Accessibility Global Alliance on Accessible Technologies and Environments

The ultimate guide to web content accessibility

Websites with standards-compliant code all follow the typical W3C standards. But there’s a whole different level of compliance when it comes to WCAG, also known as the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines.

The same people who produce the HTML5/CSS3 specs organize and officiate these guidelines, so it’s truly an international system of coding standards. Most web developers never bother with WCAG accessibility, but it’s becoming a huge aspect of the internet.

If you’re looking to understand accessibility or just want to delve a bit deeper into the subject, then this guide is for you. I’ll explain some basics of WCAG conformance for a beginner, along with all the tools and resources you’ll need to keep learning along the way.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The ultimate guide to web content accessibility – InVision Blog

New accessible purchasing rules for Australian government – Information Access Group

In great news for people with disability, last month the Australian Government announced that all levels of government will adopt an internationally aligned standard for purchasing websites, software and digital devices.

This means that, when governments buy products and services, they must be accessible. …

So, this is a great step forward for inclusion in our country.Of course, we’ll be keen to learn how it stacks up in practice, and it will be the feedback of people with disability that will tell the real story.

The standard that Australia will follow is called ‘Accessibility requirements suitable for public procurement of ICT products and services’ and it is mandated in Europe. You can read the full standard here.

And you can read the government media release here.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: New accessible purchasing rules for government – Information Access Group

How to do Web Accessibility QA: Part 2 | Viget

 

Accessibility QA starts with broadening your frame of reference and understanding what it’s like to use a computer in unfamiliar ways. With that understanding, we can dive into actual testing.

The usual starting point is to read the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (aka WCAG), which define the current accessibility standard. (The older Section 508 standard is relevant only for government sites.) But good luck understanding WCAG on first glance.

WCAG is broken into three levels (A, AA, AAA); four principles; 12 guidelines; and 61 success criteria. It’s hard to make sense of WCAG’s multi-layered categorization, jargon, and sheer number of items.

The good news: You don’t have to worry about all that to get started. Instead, I find it easier to think in terms of these broad goals:

  • Goal 1: People who don’t use a mouse should be able to use and understand a site.
  • Goal 2: People who don’t look at a screen should be able to use and understand a site.
  • Goal 3: A site’s content should be visually legible.
  • Goal 4: People should have access to alternate versions of video and audio content.
  • Goal 5: People should have control over automatic changes to the page.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source:
How to do Web Accessibility QA: Part 2 | Viget