Monthly Archives: April 2017

We need to talk about Accessibility on Chatbots

What happens when a blind person wants to use your chatbot?

This idea started after I did a research on UX for autonomous cars or self-driving cars. I did some interviews with 4 people, one of them being blind. I was really surprised to know that she can fully take care of herself and go around using her phone and guide dog. She uses her phone and her dog as interfaces to do something that (unfortunately) she is not able to.

After the interviews, I started my UX research and then, another surprise: the aspects of UX for self-driving cars — which I noticed basically two:

  • Visual design — “how can we let people know what the car sees?” Tons of (interesting) concepts of visual design to let people understand and see what the car sees while it’s driving itself.
  • Affordances — “How can we make people interact with the car?” I have seen nice buttons, panels and clues that help people interact with the cars.

With those two main aspects in mind, I started questioning myself:

What about blind people? How will they use self-driving cars?

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: We need to talk about Accessibility on Chatbots

How to Get Your iPhone to Read On-Screen Text Aloud to You

Being able to hear written text on your phone read aloud to you can serve multiple purposes. If you have any type of impaired vision, it can certainly help in that regard. It’s also useful in settings where you don’t have the time nor capability to stare at your phone and read large blocks of text. Perhaps you want to treat whatever your reading as an audiobook of sorts.Whatever the case may be, your iPhone is perfectly capable of reading nearly any text you select back to you. All you first need to do is enable this feature in Settings.

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Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How to Get Your iPhone to Read On-Screen Text Aloud to You

5 Ways to Make Your Web Content More Neurodiversity Inclusive | NOS Magazine

When most people think about accessibility in technology, their first thought may be about accessibility for blind or D/deaf people: captioning, visual descriptions or Braille conversion. Blind and D/deaf people aren’t the only ones who benefit from inclusive technology, though. Autistic people, people with learning disabilities, people with ADHD and other neurodivergent people also have access needs that site designers and developers can meet. Here are five ways you can make your websites and apps more accessible for neurodivergent people.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 5 Ways to Make Your Web Content More Neurodiversity Inclusive | NOS Magazine

Designing for Accessibility: The Ultimate in UX


Designing for users with a broad range of abilities can bring challenges. But, before you start thinking “Great, more stuff to limit my rockstar designs” — recognize this: Smart designs aren’t created to impress your peers. Smart designs (and smart designers!) use design elements like color, placement, and interaction in very intentional ways to help site visitors accomplish their goals — while giving the user the most enjoyable experience possible.

So how do you create impressive, accessible designs? These 6 tips will help you create accessible designs that meet the minimum standards of Section 508 and Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0.

1 . Start with Wireframes

Now you might be thinking “Duh! This is obvious.” But how often do you consider accessibility at this step? Designing for accessibility means considering all users from the start.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Designing for Accessibility: The Ultimate in UX