Monthly Archives: July 2017

Accessibility according to actual people with disabilities

“If you have a disability, what’s the hardest thing about browsing the web?” The answers to Safia Abdalla’s tweet are truly eye-opening and shows us what web accessibility should really be about.

 In this article I’ll summarize and group the main topics that people bring up in the thread.But do click on the tweet and read through all the answers. It’s an awesome read for anyone interested in making the web a better place for all. And, in my opinion, a far better place to learn about accessibility than reading any checklist or standard.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility according to actual people with disabilities – Axess Lab

At this month’s WWDC, Apple unveiled refined accessibility tools

…for all the focus on refinement, there also is a cavalcade of new stuff to be excited about. As it pertains to accessibility, some obvious highlights for me are the 10.5” iPad Pro and the corresponding iPad-centric enhancements in iOS 11. I’m also psyched for smaller niceties too, such as the ability to automatically enter Reader View in Safari on iOS and macOS. I use this mode all the time; it makes reading on the web a much more pleasant—and accessible!—experience. Reader View is one of my favorite and most-used tools on both iOS and the Mac.

Apple announced a boatload of stuff at WWDC, and it’s quite a task to process it all and ruminate on what it means. With this sentiment in mind, here are my three biggest takeaways around accessibility and the conference that matter most.

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: At this month’s WWDC, Apple unveiled refined accessibility tools | TechCrunch

Google Maps now lets users add wheelchair accessibility details for locations 

Back in December, Google finally added accessibility details to Maps. It was a long awaited addition, but an extremely welcome one for the more than three million people in the U.S. who require wheelchair accessibility. As we noted at the time, however, the available information still left a lot to be desired. Maps has currently collected accessibility data for almost seven million places, but even with databases like Wheelmap, there were still some pretty big gaps across the country.This week, Google’s l

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Google Maps now lets users add wheelchair accessibility details for locations | TechCrunch

The web is awesome and everyone should be able to read it.

These last months I’ve been improving my website accessibility so anyone can understand it. Here’s what I’ve learned:
By anyone I mean any person that doesn’t use the internet like I do. Having empathy with the users is one of the things I’ve been learning on web development. You should give it a try as well. Not everyone interacts with an interface or uses the same device and input devices as you do.
Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within the other person’s frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in another’s position. — wikipedia
So you should adapt your product for them. By adapting I don’t mean making it uglier. I mean making it simple. And doing something simple is hard. It’s good to force yourself to rethink your interface or logic in order to accomplish a more complete and intuitive solution.

That old lady being awesome on the web
The problem
I love to explore new interactive ways to communicate a message, so last Summer I rethought my personal website. I don’t consider it a straightforward portfolio, as interaction is the way to explore it. That’s the best part about it and at the same time the worst part.
Some months ago I got to know that users who use only keyboard or screen readers can’t understand shit. They have so many visual and interactive elements to explore that they end up lost. As a web lover, excluding people from using it to its fullest potential, just makes me really sad.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The web is awesome and everyone should be able to read it.

Microsoft app that tells the visually impaired what’s in front of them

This free app is helping the visually impaired  

Microsoft is putting its artificial intelligence technology to work to help the visually impaired.

The company said on Wednesday that it’s releasing an iOS app called Seeing AI that uses an iPhone’s camera to tell people about objects in front of them. The app shows off Microsoft’s current capabilities in AI, while also addressing a group that the technology industry too often ignores.

Microsoft first revealed the technology to an audience of developers last year, but at the time it was only shown as working on smart glasses. Now anyone with an iPhone or iPad can try it…

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source