Monthly Archives: September 2017

Does fashion care about disabled people and the purple pound?

Britain’s disabled population has a spending power of £80bn, yet, as a frustrating shopping trip to Mayfair proved, many clothes shops are completely inaccessible

Kelly Knox modelling Teatum Jones AW17Catherine Teatum and Rob Jones have a positive understanding of practical issues affecting disabled shoppers.

Britain’s disabled population has a spending power of £80bn, yet, as a frustrating shopping trip to Mayfair proved, many clothes shops are completely inaccessible

 …
Since childhood, fashion has always given me joy. It has allowed me to present myself to the world as the person I am and strive to be, irrespective of the physical limitations of my disability. But in the five years since severe illness forced me to use a mobility scooter to get around, online retailers have become my primary access to new trends, owing to poor accessibility on my local high street. Recently, I heard about a disability charity’s campaign to improve shop access and wondered whether navigating luxury fashion stores on four wheels would be any less challenging. It seemed logical that designer labels, which often shell out millions to create opulent showrooms, would invest in basic equipment for access. So I ventured into Mayfair – one of London’s most expensive areas to shop – to explore the AW17 collections up close.

From the moment I rode out on to New Bond Street, I was beset by obstacles. It started with attempting to enter a designer store with a stepped entrance, then performing a red-faced U-turn outside because sales staff couldn’t provide a ramp.

As I continued around Mayfair, I discovered boutique after boutique with stepped entrances and no access ramps. Often staff delivered this information with an expression of bewilderment as to why anyone would require one, and nearly half of the shops I visited said they didn’t have lifts to access upper floors.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Does fashion care about disabled people and the purple pound? | Global | The Guardian

A better world for wheels on Google Maps

Starting today, we’re calling on Local Guides, a community of people who contribute their expertise about places on Google Maps, to add more wheelchair accessibility attributes to the map. If each of our tens of millions of Local Guides answers three of these questions every day for two weeks, we can gather nearly two billion answers to help people who rely on this information every day.

More than 65 million people worldwide need wheelchairs. I became one of them after an accident eight years ago, and I discovered what it’s like to navigate the world on wheels.

As I learned, those of us with mobility issues need information about places before we arrive. Does the art museum have a stair-free entrance? What about the cafe across the street? And is there an accessible restroom at that new restaurant?

Google Maps now offers answers that allow me—and millions of others on wheels—to find accessible places. Because anyone can identify and label wheelchair-friendly locations directly on the map, it’s easy to share this knowledge around the world. But not everyone knows this tool exists, so we want to do more.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: A better world for wheels on Google Maps

Accessibility for Software and Devices | Microsoft

Our commitment to accessibility Microsoft’s mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more. With over 1 billion people with disabilities in the world, we’re passionate about ensuring that our products and services are designed for people of all abilities. We are committed to transparency, accountability, and inclusion in our products and our culture, and we are deeply inspired by the opportunity to work with others around the world to explore what’s possible. There a …

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility for Software and Devices | Microsoft

Face ID Accessibility. Apple offers some answers

Apple today made a series of hardware announcements.

Understandably, the announcement that has caused the most social media chatter in the blind community relates to the iPhone X, and it’s new Face ID feature.

Apple has earned our trust over the years by ensuring that its products are fully accessible from their initial launch, so few observers were in any doubt that Apple would have given thought to the accessibility of this new feature. However, were there limitations of the technology that simply made it a non-starter for some people?

I wrote to Apple, and quickly received a response to some of my initial questions.

My questions stem from the fact that I am congenitally blind. My particular eye condition causes my eyes to look small and a little sunken, and they are often closed. Further, I have a form of congenital cataracts. I was curious to know whether Face ID would work for someone like me and others I know with prosthetic eyes, given that during the keynote, Apple indicated that the iPhone X would not unlock unless you gave the phone your attention.

Apple says the following.

 

The iPhone X has been designed with a number of accessibility features to support its use.

For VoiceOver users, Face ID will prompt you as to how to move your head during set up in order to complete a scan. If you do not want Face ID to require attention, you can open Settings > General > Accessibility, and disable Require Attention for Face ID. This is automatically disabled if you enable VoiceOver during initial set up.

What’s new with Accessibility in iOS 11?

iOS 11 has some helpful new options in Accessibility to assist any person and everybody customise their iPhone and iPad interface to paintings with them and for them. Here is what’s new.

Sensible Invert

Sensible Invert is a brand new atmosphere to be added to the Invert Colours phase of Accessibility in iOS. While colour inversion inverts the whole lot at the display, Sensible Invert inverts solely the spaces the place it can be deemed vital for somebody who calls for it. Differently, photographs keep true, and different insignificant components of the person interface stay unchanged.

To allow Sensible Invert:

  1. Release Settings out of your House Display screen.
  2. Faucet Common.
  3. Faucet Accessibility
  4. Faucet Show Lodging.
  5. Faucet Invert Colours.
  6. Faucet the transfer subsequent to Sensible Invert.

Auto-brightness

Within the Show Lodging phase of Accessibility, you’ll now get right of entry to the Auto-brightness function to allow or disable it. When enabled, your display will brighten or dim, relying at the lighting fixtures stipulations round you. For those who disable it, it will impact your total battery existence, however would possibly not mess along with your eyes if lighting fixtures stipulations trade .

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: What’s new with Accessibility in iOS 11?

There’s Always Something to be Done: Liz Henry on Being Disabled in Tech

Liz Henry, with plastic framed glasses, purple blue hair, and a hoody, sits in the Longmore Institute. Her motorized wheelchair is to her left.

Liz is currently the release manager for Mozilla, and has worked in two eras of tech: the 1990s and the mid-2000s to the present. She learned her computer skills from tinkering with computers from a young age, and having the freedom to experiment. In addition to her work in open source software, Liz is a blogger, writer and translator, and is involved in hackerspace projects. Liz deals with mobility impairments, and chronic pain from those impairments, that have a significant effect on how she can work.

The structure of Liz’s work at Mozilla has many benefits for her because of her mobility impairments. Instead of working on a traditional hourly schedule, she has longer timeframes, like six weeks to work on a project. This means that even if she is not productive over a specific hour or even a day, she is very productive over the course of those six weeks. In addition to this, Liz often works remotely with a distributed team who are in many different time zones around the world. It is not important that everyone be working at the same time. It’s more important that communication is strong, persistent, and frequent.  If she has a flare-up and is unable to leave the house she still has the possibility of getting work done. She often thinks, as she is working from bed, that this job is perfect for people with mobility issues.

In addition, the fact that her physical condition can change at a moment’s notice means that she is very good at contingency planning. And since software release, as she describes it, can be  “a constant disaster,” this skill is very helpful in her workplace. In her opinion, anyone with a disability who has managed their own healthcare competently, with all the medical, insurance, and government bureaucracies, has many skills needed in software project management – tracking a complex process and coordinating work across several teams.

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Read full article at Source: There’s Always Something to be Done: Liz Henry on Being Disabled in Tech – Disability Remix Blog

ARIA Labels and Relationships  |  Web  |  Google Developers

using aria-label to identify an image only buttonLabels

ARIA provides several mechanisms for adding labels and descriptions to elements. In fact, ARIA is the only way to add accessible help or description text. Let’s look at the properties ARIA uses to create accessible labels.

aria-label

aria-label allows us to specify a string to be used as the accessible label. This overrides any other native labeling mechanism, such as a label element — for example, if a button has both text content and an aria-label, only the aria-label value will be used.

You might use an aria-label attribute when you have some kind of visual indication of an element’s purpose, such as a button that uses a graphic instead of text, but still need to clarify that purpose for anyone who cannot access the visual indication, such as a button that uses only an image to indicate its purpose.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: ARIA Labels and Relationships  |  Web  |  Google Developers

Accessibility features in macOS and iOS that everyone should try

iphone mac pixabay

If you’re someone who doesn’t have any specific reasons to go there, you may have never explored the Accessibility settings on your Mac, iPhone, or iPad. While it’s true that those settings are there primarily for people who have special physical needs to modify how a device’s interface works, the fact is, many people who don’t consider themselves in need of any sort of accommodation can find something of value in these settings.

Accessibility has become a place where Apple buries some specific, nitpicky details about how its devices behave–and that’s why you should take a stroll through those settings sometime just to see if they solve problems you didn’t even realize were solvable. Here are some of my favorites:

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at source.

Using Keyboard-only Navigation, for Web Accessibility

Blind and low-vision users, as well as those with mobility disabilities, rely on their keyboards — not a mouse — to navigate websites. Online forms are keyboard "traps" when they don't allow a user to tab through it without completing a field. That is not the case with Newegg's checkout form, which properly allows users to tab through it, and ultimately return to the browser bar, without completing a field.

… Programmers are big fans of using the keyboard instead of continually shifting between the keyboard and mouse.

And yet a significant percentage of websites make it difficult or even impossible for users to perform some activities without using a mouse or other pointer device. This curious relationship between using the keyboard and developing for the keyboard has always seemed imbalanced to me.

To be fair, navigating the Internet with a keyboard is very different from using a keyboard shortcut to perform a complex task.

The keyboard shortcuts that people use with most desktop software are combinations of two to four keys that directly activate menu actions buried somewhere in the program’s options.

Navigating a website with the keyboard primarily requires only a few keys, but they’re used constantly. The following keys are most fundamental to using a website.

  • TAB
  • SHIFT+TAB
  • SPACE
  • ENTER
  • The left, right, up, and down arrow keys.

In complex web applications, like Google Docs, more complex keyboard shortcuts are common. But for an average ecommerce site — where the priorities are getting the user to find a page, learn about a product, and then go through the purchase process — those keys are usually all you need. These are the keys that are natively defined by browsers for the operation of web pages.

Why Navigate with Just a Keyboard?

 

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Read full article at Source

Sounding out the web: accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing people [Part 2]

[Part 2]

In my previous post, I spoke with Ruth MacMullen, an academic librarian and copyright specialist from York, about her experience of being deaf and how it affects how she uses the web. In this next post in the series, Ruth shares some of the things that make life easier for her on the web, and we offer some practical tips on how you can improve accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing people.

Provide subtitles/captions

The YouTube video player showing a video about York St John University with closed captions switched on. The captions are displayed over two lines with the end of the sentence cut off.“Subtitles, that’s the really obvious one”, remarks Ruth as we discuss the things that help her the most. In my previous post, she described the frustration of viewing a video posted on Facebook that lacked subtitles.

Subtitles or captions are the words shown at the bottom of videos that explain what’s being said or what’s happening. The term “subtitles” typically refers only to spoken content, whereas “captions” also includes descriptions of non-speech sounds, such as music, applause and laughter. Outside of North America, the terms are often used interchangeably. So when Ruth refers to subtitles on videos, that’s what she’s talking about.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Sounding out the web: accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing people [Part 2] | The Paciello Group – Your Accessibility Partner (WCAG 2.0/508 audits, VPAT, usability and accessible user experience)