Monthly Archives: September 2017

Colorblind-friendly ‘Uno’ cards

In the game of Uno, knowing the color of a card is just as important as knowing its number, which means some colorblind players can be at a serious disadvantage. But now Mattel is fixing that — the company just announced a new accessible version of Uno, made with ColorADD cards.

Here’s a key that explains how the symbols work with the Uno cards and other colors:

IMAGE: MATTEL

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at source.

Sounding out the web: accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing people [Part 1] 

The largely visual nature of the web means that we tend to focus on supporting people who are blind or partially sighted. But deaf and hard of hearing people are often overlooked. I spoke with Ruth MacMullen, who is an academic librarian and copyright specialist from York in the UK, about her experience of being deaf and how it affects her use of the web.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Sounding out the web: accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing people [Part 1] | The Paciello Group – Your Accessibility Partner (WCAG 2.0/508 audits, VPAT, usability and accessible user experience)

Reframing Accessibility for the Web · An A List Apart

We need to change the way we talk about accessibility. Most people are taught that “web accessibility means that people with disabilities can use the Web”—the official definition from the W3C. This is wrong. Web accessibility means that people can use the web.  Not “people with disabilities.” Not “blind people and deaf people.” Not “people who have cognitive disabilities” or “men who are color blind” or “people with motor disabilities.” People. People who are using the web. People who are using what you’re building.We need to stop invoking the internal stereotypes we have about who is disabled.

We need to recognize that it is none of our business why our audience is using the web the way they’re using it.

We can reframe accessibility in terms of what we provide, not what other people lack. When we treat all of our users as whole people, regardless of their abilities, then we are able to approach accessibility as just another solvable—valuable—technical challenge to overcome.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Reframing Accessibility for the Web · An A List Apart Article

Defining and Measuring Usability and UX. The Big Difference Between Usability and UX

Everyone knows that user-friendly websites and apps are vital for the overall success of a business. We know that design quality indicates credibility and trust and that those things drive results.

We know this.

So how do you know that your site or app is easy to use? What steps do you take to know for sure that your design is driving those results?

This guide will define what usability and UX are (as these terms are often confused) and this guide will also show you how usability and UX can be measured.

Ready? Let’s get started.

Usability is Not UX

We hear the terms often: usability, UX but let’s admit it – although we know they are both important in the design world, we often confuse them.

Usability is about task-based interactions such as navigating a site, filling out a form, checking out at an online store, etc. It’s the ability to do something intuitively and easily.

UX is about how a person feels when they interact with your site or app. Are they encouraged to sign up to your newsletter? Are they moved by the design in the front page? Is the copy engaging or dull?

Let’s dive into some of the details.

What Exactly is Usability?

Designers, developers, and usability experts have racked their brains trying to define usability. The truth is, there is not a universal definition. There are many books and resources on the topic and not one of them is the same.

Jakob Nielsen describe usability with these five qualities or as he calls them, “Usability Goals.”

  1. Usefulness. Although it may seem obvious, you should always be curious and ask: Is this feature useful? Is it redundant? Will it help the user accomplish a task?
  2. Learnability. When a new user comes to your website or app, you want them to easily learn how to get around. What are you doing to make this happen?
  3. Memorability: When users return to the design after a period of not using it, will they remember it?
  4. Errors: What happens when uses make an error? How many errors do users make, and do they eventually find a solution?
  5. Satisfaction. How pleasant is it to use the design? Are users sharing the website? Have you delighted them or did the whole experience cause them frustration?

How Do You Measure Usability?

Source: Defining and Measuring Usability and UX. The Big Difference Between Usability and UX

10 guidelines to improve your web accessibility

We put together a list of ten web accessibility guidelines that will guarantee access to your site to any person, in spite of their disabilities.

There’s a quote by Tim Berners-Lee, Director of W3C and inventor of the World Wide Web, that says, “The power of the web is in its universality”. As people who make a living by making websites, it’s our responsibility to ensure everyone has access to them. Web accessibility seems like a tall order on paper, but it’s definitely much easier than it sounds.

Our ten web accessibility guidelines are designed to ensure that all websites are universal.

This will not only help screen reader users, but will also improve browsing experience for slow connections. We’ve sorted our guidelines by implementation time to give you a clear picture of just how much effort you’ll have to put into this process. Before you get overwhelmed, take our word for it—it’s totally worth it.

First things first:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 10 guidelines to improve your web accessibility | Aerolab