Monthly Archives: October 2017

AccessibleTech – Section 508 Explained

I. Introduction

The primary goal of Accessibility is to make certain that Information Systems can be used by people with disabilities.  A properly implemented system will provide access to information to people that use assistive technologies and it will increase usability for everybody. This is due to the fact that most accessible rules one way or another make the system friendlier for use by all.

Accessibility techniques ensure equal access to information for disable and non disable users.  Content and functionality can become fully accessible to people with one or more disabilities including visual, audio, kinetic, speech, and cognitive impairments.

To address these needs the accessibility guidelines are organized around four principles:

  1. Content must be perceivable.
  2. Interface elements in the content must be operable.
  3. Content and controls must be understandable.
  4. Content must be robust enough to work with current and future technologies.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: AccessibleTech – Section 508 Explained

Designing inclusively: Some examples

The video below has lots of examples of designing inclusively in the built environment. There are two key messages: get a diverse group of people together before you start designing, and think about all the extra people you can serve or sell to when you design with everyone in mind. While there are several videos around with a similar message, it is good to see the variety of environments covered – from transport to theatre.

Rather than take an off-the-shelf ATM, Barclays Bank commissioned the design of their ATMs and came up with the idea of a niche to hang your walking stick – a key factor as if it falls to the ground, the owner may not be able to bend down to pick it up.

The video is 8 minutes but worth the watch to the end.


Curated by (Lifekludger)
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Simple tips for easy Word doc accessibility – Media Access Australia

Two men using a phone and a laptop
Two men interacting with documents on a mobile and a laptop

Creating Word documents that can be read and understood by a diverse range of people, is just as vital as creating accessible, inclusive websites and online content. Imagine going to a recruitment website and downloading the Position Description as a Word document, or being sent it as an email attachment, only to find that you cannot access the document using your screen reader (if you are blind or vision-impaired) can’t listen to the linked podcast (if you are Deaf or hearing impaired), or simply can’t understand large sections of it because the document is full of industry jargon that is not explained.

Let’s start with what ‘accessibility’ actually means, when it comes to a Word document. It’s about removing barriers that prevent interaction with, and the understanding of, the contents of a document, so that people of all abilities are not excluded.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Simple tips for easy Word doc accessibility – Media Access Australia

WCAG – Quick Facts and Guide – Hurix Digital

This is how WCAG guidelines help.

The standard Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (version – WCAG 2.0) is a set of rules that defines how to make web or online content more accessible, especially to people who are differently-abled. ‘Accessibility’ here could involve a wide range of limitations, including visual, auditory, physical, speech, cognitive, language, learning, and neurological.

What is it?

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) are part of a series of web accessibility guidelines

Who is it by?

It is published by the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)

In short: These guidelines form the main international standards organization when it comes to the matter of content for the Internet.

Why is it pertinent to follow WCAG guidelines?

Implementation of the WCAG guidelines helps maintain a standard quality of online content that is inclusive and serves the interest of readers with different kinds of special needs. Making a particular brand’s online content WCAG-friendly is required to showcase that you have an ‘inclusive mindset’ as a brand.

Some industries may benefit more by following WCAG norms. Those in e-tail / FMCG / e-learning might experience an increased customer base when they follow inclusive norms.

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: WCAG – Quick Facts and Guide – Hurix Digital

HTML For Screen Readers – Labelling Elements

To screen readers, a lot of the visual information that is presented on a webpage is lost. Because of this, we need to specifically provide information to them that may be obvious to a person looking at the page.

One common way people define information specifically for screen readers is to wrap the descriptive text in an element with a particular class, such as .screen-reader-text, and hide the element using a method that keeps it visible to screen readers.

Although this does work, we can use ARIA attrib…

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Read full article at Source: HTML For Screen Readers – Labelling Elements

3D-printed Nintendo Switch peripheral is huge for gaming accessibility

An engineer is helping to make playing Nintendo Switch a lot more accessible for gamers everywhere.

Engineer Julio Vazquez created two 3D-printed peripherals for the Nintendo Switch’s Joy-Con controllers, allowing players who only have the use of one hand to play Switch games more easily.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vazquez created the design on the right in April, which puts the two Joy-Cons right next to each other, effectively closing the gap that the standard Joy-Con grip creates and making it easier for players to reach every button.

But some games with more complex control schemes, like The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, require more simultaneous button and joystick interaction though, so Vazquez also created the design on the left.

Vazquez says he was inspired to create the single-hand Joy-Con adapters by his friend who lost his ability to use his right hand.

Source

The Accessibility Cheatsheet

We all know that accessibility is important. The problem is, it is not always clear what exactly we can do to make our sites more accessible.

The Web Accessibility Initiative created some Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) targeted at us, web content developers, to create more accessible websites. The WCAG contain some very useful information, and so I decided to condense the very extensive guidelines and highlight some practical examples of what we can do to implement them and make our websites more accessible.

Overview

The guidelines for accessible content have four overarching principles, each with more specific guidelines. You can click on the link to go to the relevant section of this article.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The Accessibility Cheatsheet