Monthly Archives: November 2017

How Current Design Trends Impact Web Accessibility

Hands sketching a website layout on a digital tablet, meant to illustrate a UX Designer working to create a layout with web accessibility and inclusive design in mind.

“You are not your users.”
“Involve people with disabilities in user testing.”
“The average user does not exist.”
“Design for the extremes, and the middle will take care of itself.”

We hear these phrases all the time, yet a lot of people still believe that accessibility is mostly a quality assurance or developer’s responsibility, something they should only have to think about when the actual coding phase begins. But some of the really impactful decisions that make or break accessibility for people with disabilities and seniors are, in fact, made during the design phase.

Yes, you read that right. Let me rephrase it for you: a lot of the accessibility issues that people run into on our sites and applications are caused by uneducated decisions made during the design phase. You and I have the power to do something about that.

In this post, we’ll explore some of the design trends we increasingly run into on the Web today, and how decisions made during the design phases can have a hugely detrimental effect on anyone who uses the web in a slightly differently way. But first…

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How Current Design Trends Impact Web Accessibility

Best Color Contrast Checkers for Accessibility Testing

Whether you are designing, developing, testing or auditing, a contrast ratio checker is the best way to ensure your site or app passes accessibility criteria. As a designer you can use a simple value checker to plug in foreground and background color value as you use them. You could also use other tools to check final design designs in their entirety. As a developer or someone conducting a website accessibility audit, you’ll likely want to use tools that can check completed web pages.

Contrast Ratio Requirements for Text in WCAG 2.0 Level AA & AAA

Accessibility Color Contrast Example
When designing or developing accessible websites, web applications or mobile apps, it may be obvious that text should be very legible. After all, the more difficulty user have reading your information, the less likely they are to interact, engage, purchase or take whatever other action you consider key to success. This is doubly so when developing for persons with low-vision.

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 stipulate two minimum contrast ratios between text and its background color on websites, applications or mobile apps.

To meet the level AA success criteria text smaller than 18 point (or 14 point if bold) must have a 4.5:1 contrast ratio. All larger text must have a contrast ratio of 3:1 or greater.

The more stringent AAA criteria the requires text under 18 point (or 14 point if bold) to exceed a contrast ratio of 7:1. All larger text must have a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Best Color Contrast Checkers for Accessibility Testing – Vance Bell, Philadelphia, PA

Writing CSS with Accessibility in Mind

An introduction to web accessibility. Tips on how to improve the accessibility of your web sites and apps with CSS.

… a lot of things have changed and CSS now gives us an incredible set of tools to style the web. We went from Verdana to Webfonts, from fixed widths to Responsive Web Design, from table-based layouts to Grid, and we don’t have to use images anymore for borders, fonts or shadows. We have custom propertiesFeature Queriescalc() and numerous new units. This of course is only a subset of the great developments of the last years.

Writing CSS with Accessibility in Mind

While this wide range of properties and endless ways of solving tasks with CSS makes our lives easier, it also creates the potential to worsen the experience for our users. It’s actually possible to make a website inaccessible in just three lines of CSS.

In this post I’ve collected techniques, considerations and approaches that will help you write more accessible CSS. The collection starts with basic concepts and well-known properties and covers some of the newer stuff at the end.

In the end it got way bigger than expected, so here’s a handy menu so you can jump directly to a section that interests you the most:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Writing CSS with Accessibility in Mind – Manuel Matuzovic – Medium

HTML Source Order vs CSS Display Order

Last month in my post Source Order Matters I wrote about why we need to consider how the source order of the HTML of a page can affect users when the CSS re-orders the content visually. While I used a recipe as an analogue and cited WCAG conformance rules,I failed to provide specific examples. I prepared one for my talk at Accessibility Camp Toronto, but have since expanded on it with more examples.

I want to make sure that we all understand that the source order versus display order discussion is not unique to CSS Flexbox. It is not unique to CSS Grids. Many developers have been dealing with this (correctly and incorrectly) since CSS floats and absolute positioning were introduced (and even earlier with tabled layouts). As such, I have examples of each in this post (no tabled layouts).

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: HTML Source Order vs CSS Display Order | Adrian Roselli

WebAIM: Accessible CSS

Introduction
Cascading Style Sheets, or CSS, allow you to modify characteristics of existing HTML elements. All web browsers have a built-in style sheet that defines the default styling for all elements. For instance, when the browser sees the tag, it knows to skip a line and start a new section because that’s what the built-in style sheet instructs it to do. The , and every other HTML tag is defined in this style sheet; their size, color, position, and other characteristics are all defined within it. When a page author defines their own styles, they can override this built-in style sheet and tell the browser to display elements in a different way.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: WebAIM: Accessible CSS

The Writer’s Guide to Making Accessible Web Content

Left-handed people are surrounded by items that aren’t designed for them. Scissors, golf clubs, desks, video game controllers: it’s a right-hander’s world, and it’s annoying that they don’t take your needs into account.

But imagine moving from annoyed to frustrated, because a product is completely unusable. That’s what it feels like to use the Internet if you have a disability. What acts as a small speed bump for some can feel like a mountain to those with disabilities.

“But what can I do?” you ask. “Accessibility has to be designed and coded.”

True. But it doesn’t stop there. Accessibility is about your image alt text, header design, closed captioning, and other little things that anyone can add to their blog posts, websites, and videos. It’ll make your content more accessible, for everyone—even search engines.

Here’s how you can play a role in making the web a more accessible place, and optimize your content for everyone.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The Writer’s Guide to Making Accessible Web Content

Accessibility on Mac: The ultimate guide

The Mac stays one of essentially the most obtainable platforms lately, with options to serve all wishes.

Computers will have to be for everybody, and that comes with the ones with bodily impairments, whether or not or not it’s to their sight, listening to, or motor serve as. Apple strives to create merchandise and instrument which can be as obtainable as conceivable to as many of us as conceivable. Here’s how you’ll arrange accessibility options on Mac to cause them to paintings for you and your wishes.

How to permit VoiceOver on Mac

For the visually impaired, VoiceOver is a handy gizmo that reads out what is on the display screen and likewise permits you to know what your mouse is over in order that you do not click on the unsuitable factor.

How to permit VoiceOver on Mac ^(https://www.appleglory.com/how-enable-voiceover-mac)

How to make use of Zoom on Mac

If you might have bother studying textual content on your Mac or wish to see portions of your display screen in larger element, then you’ll permit the Zoom serve as, which mainly provides a magnifying glass on your display screen. You can transfer it round and keep an eye on the zoom on your center’s content material.

How to make use of Zoom on Mac ^(https://www.appleglory.com/how-use-zoom-mac)

How to switch the glance of closed captions on Mac

Closed captions can paintings to let you know what is being stated in movies on your Mac. If the manner or dimension of closed captions is not operating for you, you’ll alternate them up to fit your wishes.

How to switch the glance of closed captions on Mac ^(https://www.appleglory.com/how-change-look-closed-captions-mac)

 …

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility on Mac: The ultimate guide

How to Get a Virtual Home Button on iPhone X in 3 Simple Steps

iPhone X

There’s no Home button on the iPhone X. This means you need to relearn more than a dozen new gestures. Maybe you don’t like some of them. Maybe they’re a bit too awkward for you, at least for now. If you’re looking for a stop gap, you’ll find the answer in AssistiveTouch. Apple’s accessibility feature essentially behaves as a software home button that can do a lot more than just take you home.

Once AssistiveTouch is enabled and set up, you can assign 3D Touch and long press shortcuts to the floating on-screen button. And when you tap on it, several shortcuts will show up – including things like accessing Siri, App Switcher, taking a Screenshot and more.

The 3 steps to get a virtual Home button on your iPhone X are as follows:

Curated by Lifekludger, read the full story at iphonehacks