Monthly Archives: November 2017

Important things to in mind for Accessibility & Usability of an application

A mobile application is a medium where a user can get all the information related to your services and products. Here, UI (User Interface) and UX (User Experience) part plays an important role. It can help you to increase the acceptability of an app. Accordingly, it increases the usability of an application will inflate the accessibility.

To increase the usability of an application, you need to take care of a couple of things that are mentioned below.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Important things to in mind for Accessibility & Usability of an application

Accessible website design for users with disabilities lags far behind demand

“The internet is, in essence, broken,” said Todd Bankofier, the CEO of accessibility software company AudioEye. Last week the company announced a partnership with web design firm Dealer Inspire, which makes customer-facing sites for auto retailers, to implement AudioEye’s Ally Toolbar across their entire portfolio.

The move “expands our reach immediately, making it much more efficient to continue our mission to make the most expansive infrastructure in the world accessible to everyone,” Bankofier added.

Even the most well-meaning brand leaders and site designers have too narrow a view of what constitutes disability, he said. It’s not just people who are blind, deaf, or use wheelchairs: people with autism, PTSD, visual impairment, epilepsy, dyslexia or colorblindness all have different needs for digital access. AudioEye’s Ally Toolbar takes all these users into account and allows a person to select precisely the site they need to see.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessible website design for users with disabilities lags far behind demand | Campaign US

21 Chrome Extensions for Special Needs

21 Chrome Extensions for Struggling Students and Special Needs

Technology can be a powerful tool to assist students with special needs or any sort of learning challenge. In particular the Chrome web browser allows users to install a wide variety of web extensions that provide tools that can help all learners, regardless of ability level.In this blog post we will take a look at 21 Chrome web extensions that can assist students in five main categories: Text to Speech, Readability, Reading Comprehension, Focus, Navigation

Some of the tools fit into more than one topic, but each is only listed once. Certainly this list does not cover all of the useful web extensions available for struggling learners, but it is a great place to begin. In addition to the list of extension, I have also linked in the video and help guide from a webinar I did a while back on “Google Tools for Special Needs”.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Control Alt Achieve: 21 Chrome Extensions for Struggling Students and Special Needs

Easy Checks – A First Review of Web Accessibility | (WAI) | W3C

Easy Checks – A First Review of Web Accessibility

This page helps you start to assess the accessibility of a web page. With these simple steps, you can get an idea whether or not accessibility is addressed in even the most basic way.

These checks cover just a few accessibility issues and are designed to be quick and easy, rather than definitive. A web page could seem to pass these checks, yet still have significant accessibility barriers. More robust assessment is needed to evaluate accessibility comprehensively.

This page provides checks for the following specific aspects of a web page. It also provides guidance on Next Steps and links to more evaluation resources.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Easy Checks – A First Review of Web Accessibility | Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) | W3C

An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query | CSS-Tricks

The open web’s success is built on interoperable technologies. The ability to control animation now exists alongside important features such as zooming content, installing extensions, enabling high contrast display, loading custom stylesheets, or disabling JavaScript. Sites all too often inundate their audiences with automatically playing, battery-draining, resource-hogging animations. The need for people being able to take back control of animations might be more prevalent than you may initially think.

Although technology unintentionally inflicting adverse effects has existed before this, the popularity of iOS gave the issue prominence. Apple has great support for accessibility, so an option in the operating system preferences to disable motion effects for those with vestibular disorders was added in response.

#Vestibu-what?

Your vestibular system provides an internal sensor to communicate your body’s physical position and orientation in the world, and is key to controlling balance and eye movement.

Vestibular disorders can cause your vestibular system to struggle to make sense of what is happening, resulting in loss of balance and vertigo, migraines, nausea, and hearing loss. Anyone who has spun around too quickly is familiar with a confused vestibular system.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query | CSS-Tricks

How to Make Your Website Accessible to People Who Use a Screen Magnifier

There’s a lot of content out there on how to make your website accessible. But I haven’t seen much on the subject of accessibility to users of screen magnifiers. I’m one of them, and I frequently run into annoying issues on the web.In this article, I’ll give some tips on how you can make your website more accessible to users of screen magnifying software.

Source: How to Make Your Website Accessible to People Who Use a Screen Magnifier