All posts by Lifekludger

Prototyping accessibility in web and mobile UI design

Adaptable, interactive and coherent prototypes for users with disabilities. Covering accessibility in the prototyping phase of web and app design.

Pay close attention to color, contrast and visual hierarchy

Make your interactive UI elements more interactive

Don’t crowd me!

Make your app accessible by being adaptable

“Flexibility is the key to ensuring that your website is accessible to everyone.” Shaun Anderson, Hobo Web

Prototyping responsive design is actually pretty easy. With Justinmind prototyping tool, it really only involves creating a set of screens of different sizes (to represent the different screens sizes that your users use), adding the content to each screen, and adding linking events between the screens. In fact, we’ve created a nifty tutorial in our Support section to teach you step by step.

Don’t forget the user testing

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Prototyping accessibility in web and mobile UI design

The Section 508 Refresh is Here! 

We’re excited to announce that the U.S. Access Board has published its long-awaited update(link is external) to the federal regulations covering the accessibility of information and communications technology (Section 508) and telecommunications products and services (Section 255).

What are Section 508 and Section 255?

Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 applies to federal government agencies and the technology providers that sell to them. It requires that all information and communications technology (ICT) the federal government develops, procures, maintains, and uses be accessible to people with disabilities. This ensures that (1) Federal employees with disabilities have comparable access to, and use of, information and data relative to other federal workers, and (2) members of the public with disabilities receive comparable access to publicly-available information and services.

Section 508 applies to a wide range of technology products, including computer hardware and software, websites, video/multimedia products, phone systems, and copiers.

Section 255 of the Communications Act applies to telecommunications equipment manufacturers and service providers. It requires that telecommunications equipment and services be accessible to, and usable by, individuals with disabilities.

Why did the Access Board update these rules?

The Access Board updated and reorganized the Section 508 standards and Section 255 guidelines in response to market trends and innovations. Section 508 was last updated in 2000, and technology has evolved significantly since then. For example, in some cases different technological systems are now capable of performing similar tasks.

PEAT and other technology and disability experts anticipate that the updated rules will generate significant benefits for individuals with disabilities, including:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The Section 508 Refresh is Here! | Partnership on Employment & Accessible Technology (PEAT)

Writing HTML with accessibility in mind – A List Apart

We’re excited to announce that the U.S. Access Board has published its long-awaited update(link is external) to the federal regulations covering the accessibility of information and communications technology (Section 508) and telecommunications products and services (Section 255).

What are Section 508 and Section 255?

Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 applies to federal government agencies and the technology providers that sell to them.

Section 508 applies to a wide range of technology products, including computer hardware and software, websites, video/multimedia products, phone systems, and copiers.

Section 255 of the Communications Act applies to telecommunications equipment manufacturers and service providers. It requires that telecommunications equipment and services be accessible to, and usable by, individuals with disabilities.

Why did the Access Board update these rules?

The Access Board updated and reorganized the Section 508 standards and Section 255 guidelines in response to market trends and innovations. Section 508 was last updated in 2000, and technology has evolved significantly since then. For example, in some cases different technological systems are now capable of performing similar tasks.

PEAT and other technology and disability experts anticipate that the updated rules will generate significant benefits for individuals with disabilities, including:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Writing HTML with accessibility in mind – A List Apart Sidebar – Medium

Maintaining Accessibility in a Responsive World

…being “accessible” means many things. It means that a page must load quickly—even in slow and spotty mobile networks.

After loading, the page should be usable and feel appropriate and intuitive to folks using any device, browser, viewport size, and assistive technology. More often than not, the practices we use to achieve these goals play nicely together, but sometimes one optimization can complicate another.

When that happens, we try to step back and find ways to satisfy all our priorities.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Maintaining Accessibility in a Responsive World | Filament Group, Inc., Boston, MA

Making your site accessible using W3C’s Easy Checks

We’ve put together an infographic based on the W3C’s ten easy checks.

While this is by no means an extensive checklist, we hope it will help when considering the first steps that can be taken in order to ensure your website is accessible.

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article and Download the full infographic from Source: Making your site accessible using W3C’s Easy Checks

The art of labelling — A11ycasts #12

There’s a lot of neat tricks in this video by Rob Dodson where he focuses on accessibility tricks in Chrome’s DevTools. A few notes:

  • Chrome DevTools has an experimental feature to help with accessibility testing that you can unlock if you head to chrome://flags/ and turn on in the DevTools settings.
  • Wrapping an <input type="checkbox"> in a <label>gives the input a name of the text in the label, even without a for attribute.
  • The aria-labelledby attribute overrides the name of the element with the text taken from a different element, referenced by ID. It can even compose a name together from multiple elements, including itself.
  • Adding tabindex='0' to an element will make it focusable.


Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at css-tricks

Make your Word documents accessible – Office Support

This topic gives you step-by-step instructions to make your Word documents accessible to people with disabilities.People who are blind or have low vision can understand your documents more easily if you create them with accessibility in mind. Visual Components such as this image need meaningful alternate text.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Make your Word documents accessible – Office Support