All posts by Lifekludger

We need to talk about Accessibility on Chatbots

What happens when a blind person wants to use your chatbot?

This idea started after I did a research on UX for autonomous cars or self-driving cars. I did some interviews with 4 people, one of them being blind. I was really surprised to know that she can fully take care of herself and go around using her phone and guide dog. She uses her phone and her dog as interfaces to do something that (unfortunately) she is not able to.

After the interviews, I started my UX research and then, another surprise: the aspects of UX for self-driving cars — which I noticed basically two:

  • Visual design — “how can we let people know what the car sees?” Tons of (interesting) concepts of visual design to let people understand and see what the car sees while it’s driving itself.
  • Affordances — “How can we make people interact with the car?” I have seen nice buttons, panels and clues that help people interact with the cars.

With those two main aspects in mind, I started questioning myself:

What about blind people? How will they use self-driving cars?

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: We need to talk about Accessibility on Chatbots

How to Get Your iPhone to Read On-Screen Text Aloud to You

Being able to hear written text on your phone read aloud to you can serve multiple purposes. If you have any type of impaired vision, it can certainly help in that regard. It’s also useful in settings where you don’t have the time nor capability to stare at your phone and read large blocks of text. Perhaps you want to treat whatever your reading as an audiobook of sorts.Whatever the case may be, your iPhone is perfectly capable of reading nearly any text you select back to you. All you first need to do is enable this feature in Settings.

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Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How to Get Your iPhone to Read On-Screen Text Aloud to You

5 Ways to Make Your Web Content More Neurodiversity Inclusive | NOS Magazine

When most people think about accessibility in technology, their first thought may be about accessibility for blind or D/deaf people: captioning, visual descriptions or Braille conversion. Blind and D/deaf people aren’t the only ones who benefit from inclusive technology, though. Autistic people, people with learning disabilities, people with ADHD and other neurodivergent people also have access needs that site designers and developers can meet. Here are five ways you can make your websites and apps more accessible for neurodivergent people.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 5 Ways to Make Your Web Content More Neurodiversity Inclusive | NOS Magazine

Designing for Accessibility: The Ultimate in UX


Designing for users with a broad range of abilities can bring challenges. But, before you start thinking “Great, more stuff to limit my rockstar designs” — recognize this: Smart designs aren’t created to impress your peers. Smart designs (and smart designers!) use design elements like color, placement, and interaction in very intentional ways to help site visitors accomplish their goals — while giving the user the most enjoyable experience possible.

So how do you create impressive, accessible designs? These 6 tips will help you create accessible designs that meet the minimum standards of Section 508 and Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0.

1 . Start with Wireframes

Now you might be thinking “Duh! This is obvious.” But how often do you consider accessibility at this step? Designing for accessibility means considering all users from the start.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Designing for Accessibility: The Ultimate in UX

Developers: get started with web accessibility

If web accessibility is new to you, the path ahead can seem overwhelming.

If web accessibility is new to you, the path ahead can seem overwhelming.

It’s not so bad. I promise!

You could chase perfection forever by building accessible products for every user imaginable. That’s no different from design and development more generally: there’s always room for improvement.

But when it comes to usability — and that includes accessibility — a product doesn’t need to be perfect to be practical. Even small changes can make a big difference.

So here are some tips for how to get started. This guide is written for front-end web developers who are new to accessibility, and it’s by no means comprehensive — but I hope it will help you start a longer journey of learning.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Developers: get started with web accessibility – Medium

108 million web users are color blind. Tips for designing keeping them in mind

Design, keeping everyone in mind

As designers, you pick up the best colors for the canvas and the most engaging content for your users, but often miss out on the color blind ones. Repeating the ever-repeated stats — 8% of the males and 0.5% of the females are color blind. Now that is a HUUUGE number if your user base is big. Ignoring these 8% and 0.5% of the society is no way acceptable. Here are few tip and tricks to help you design aligned with their needs as well-

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 108 million web users are color blind. Tips for designing keeping them in mind

Changing Places > Home

The Changing Places Consortium launched its campaign in 2006 on behalf of the over 1/4 of a million people who cannot use standard accessible toilets.This includes people with profound and multiple learning disabilities, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, as well as older people. To use the toilet in safety and comfort, many people need to be able to access a Changing Places, which have more space and the right equipment, including a height adjustable changing bench and a hoist.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Changing Places > Home

Accessibility in the classroom—tools that impact my students – Office Blogs

Creating a collaborative, inclusive classroom has many moving parts and pieces—and finding the right balance can be challenging. As a special education teacher, I am constantly on the hunt for technology and tools that give students with disabilities an environment that is personalized, differentiated and yet as close to their peers’ experience as possible. I have been an itinerant teacher, a distance education math teacher at a residential school and currently a resource room teacher—without the resource room.

When I work with my students and determine how to meet their needs, I think a lot about their accommodations rather than their modifications. The outcomes for a student can have a very dramatic effect on their learning.

In my accompanying blog post, “Accommodations versus modifications in an inclusive classroom,” I outline the important differences between accommodations and modifications to accessibly personalizing student learning. With Windows 10 and Office 365—free for teachers and students—I have been able to find and use many of the accommodations that I have been looking for making consumption of materials, content creation, collaboration and organization possible for students using the same technology and tools as their peers.

These tools help my students to consume content, create content, collaborate inclusively and stay organized.

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Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility in the classroom—tools that impact my students – Office Blogs

Calls for a Technology Bill of Rights for People with Disabilities in the US

The National Council on Disability (NCD) in the United States has made a call to establish a ‘Technology Bill of Rights for People with Disabilities’ as part of a series of recommendations to the US Federal Government for making technology more accessible to people with a sensory, cognitive, or mobility disability.

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Calls for a Technology Bill of Rights for People with Disabilities in the US