Category Archives: accessibility

Changing Places > Home

The Changing Places Consortium launched its campaign in 2006 on behalf of the over 1/4 of a million people who cannot use standard accessible toilets.This includes people with profound and multiple learning disabilities, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, as well as older people. To use the toilet in safety and comfort, many people need to be able to access a Changing Places, which have more space and the right equipment, including a height adjustable changing bench and a hoist.

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Read full article at Source: Changing Places > Home

Accessibility in the classroom—tools that impact my students – Office Blogs

Creating a collaborative, inclusive classroom has many moving parts and pieces—and finding the right balance can be challenging. As a special education teacher, I am constantly on the hunt for technology and tools that give students with disabilities an environment that is personalized, differentiated and yet as close to their peers’ experience as possible. I have been an itinerant teacher, a distance education math teacher at a residential school and currently a resource room teacher—without the resource room.

When I work with my students and determine how to meet their needs, I think a lot about their accommodations rather than their modifications. The outcomes for a student can have a very dramatic effect on their learning.

In my accompanying blog post, “Accommodations versus modifications in an inclusive classroom,” I outline the important differences between accommodations and modifications to accessibly personalizing student learning. With Windows 10 and Office 365—free for teachers and students—I have been able to find and use many of the accommodations that I have been looking for making consumption of materials, content creation, collaboration and organization possible for students using the same technology and tools as their peers.

These tools help my students to consume content, create content, collaborate inclusively and stay organized.

……

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility in the classroom—tools that impact my students – Office Blogs

Emerging tech aims to improve life for handicapped

Emerging technology is giving new hope for the handicapped, and harnessing brainwaves for the physically disabled and helping the visually impaired with “artificial vision” are just the start.

Many systems showcased at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas are aimed at improving quality of life for people with disabilities.

BrainRobotics, a Massachusetts-based startup, showed its prosthesis that can be controlled by residual muscle strength of an amputee with better efficiency than similar devices, according to developers.

Over time the group wants to use technology from its sister company BrainCo to harness brain waves for improved function. BrainCo already markets a headband which helps identify patterns of brain waves to help improve focus and treat children with learning disabilities.

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Read full article at Source: Emerging tech aims to improve life for handicapped

Top tips for accessibility

Heidi Laidler, Media Access Australia’s User Experience Designer, gave a recent talk about how to test for accessibility at a ‘Hack 4 Good’ event attended by web professionals from around the country. Discover the top tips for accessibility from a user experience point of view, in this captivating podcast article.

Listen to Heidi’s complete address where she delves into the details of how to effectively test for accessibility and incorporate inclusive design principles into your web and digital communications.

Read the transcript of Heidi Laidler’s talk on top tips for accessibility

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Read full article at Source: Top tips for accessibility – Media Access Australia

A group of Google employees spent their ‘20% time’ making Google Maps wheelchair-friendly

 

Google Maps is now wheelchair-friendly.

The wildly popular map app will now tell you whether locations are suitable for people with access needs — and it’s thanks to a group of Googlers who worked on the feature in their “20% time.”

It’s a famous policy of the Californian search giant: Employees can spend 20% of their time working on other projects unrelated to their main jobs. Gmail, AdSense, and Google News all started as 20% projects.

These days, Google employees need to get permission from managers to get this time, and most don’t do it. Google HR boss Lazlo Bock says it has “waxed and waned” over time. But some still do — and Rio Akasaka is one of them.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: A group of Google employees spent their ‘20% time’ making Google Maps wheelchair-friendly | Business Insider

New Guide for Affordable and Accessible Technology Now Available Online

A new guide from ACCAN and Media Access Australia was launched this year at the annual ACCAN conference. The Affordable Access project addresses two of the key pillars of digital inclusion – affordability and accessibility of technology.

The Affordable Access project is an online guide which provides information on low-cost technology with useful accessibility features. The online resource also highlights what technology may be suitable for specific scenarios. These scenarios were created in collaboration with people with disabilities to identify commonly used products for various needs. This peer advice is a great approach to the guides as people accessing them can be confident that others are also using the technology.

Affordability and accessibility are essential if all Australians are to participate in an increasingly digitally-dependant society. However, the recent Digital Inclusion Index noted that people with a disability are some of the most digital excluded people groups in Australia. Helping people find the right technology is also a large part of the challenge, especially in specific cases such as the ones listed on the Affordable Access website.

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Read full article at Source: New Guide for Affordable and Accessible Technology Now Available Online | Go Digi

Designing Safer Web Animation For Motion Sensitivity

Val Head suggests accessible animation techniques to avoid triggering dizziness in users with inner ear and balance disorders.

It’s no secret that a lot of people consider scrolljacking and parallax effects annoying and overused. But what if motion does more than just annoy you? What if it also makes you ill?

That’s a reality that people with visually-triggered vestibular disorders have to deal with. As animated interfaces increasingly become the norm, more people have begun to notice that large-scale motion on screen can cause them dizziness, nausea, headaches, or worse. For some, the symptoms can last long after the animation is over. Yikes.

The idea that animation in our interfaces is capable of making our users dizzy wasn’t something we had to contend with much when the web was predominantly a static medium. It’s actually a fairly new revelation in most tech circles. Even Apple discovered this the hard way when the animated transitions in iOS 7 started making some people sick. Just like other elements of design, the way you use animation can have an impact on how accessible the end product is to your audience, especially if they suffer from a vestibular disorder.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Designing Safer Web Animation For Motion Sensitivity

Prototyping accessibility in web and mobile UI design

Adaptable, interactive and coherent prototypes for users with disabilities. Covering accessibility in the prototyping phase of web and app design.

Pay close attention to color, contrast and visual hierarchy

Make your interactive UI elements more interactive

Don’t crowd me!

Make your app accessible by being adaptable

“Flexibility is the key to ensuring that your website is accessible to everyone.” Shaun Anderson, Hobo Web

Prototyping responsive design is actually pretty easy. With Justinmind prototyping tool, it really only involves creating a set of screens of different sizes (to represent the different screens sizes that your users use), adding the content to each screen, and adding linking events between the screens. In fact, we’ve created a nifty tutorial in our Support section to teach you step by step.

Don’t forget the user testing

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Prototyping accessibility in web and mobile UI design