Category Archives: accessibility

WCAG – Quick Facts and Guide – Hurix Digital

This is how WCAG guidelines help.

The standard Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (version – WCAG 2.0) is a set of rules that defines how to make web or online content more accessible, especially to people who are differently-abled. ‘Accessibility’ here could involve a wide range of limitations, including visual, auditory, physical, speech, cognitive, language, learning, and neurological.

What is it?

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) are part of a series of web accessibility guidelines

Who is it by?

It is published by the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)

In short: These guidelines form the main international standards organization when it comes to the matter of content for the Internet.

Why is it pertinent to follow WCAG guidelines?

Implementation of the WCAG guidelines helps maintain a standard quality of online content that is inclusive and serves the interest of readers with different kinds of special needs. Making a particular brand’s online content WCAG-friendly is required to showcase that you have an ‘inclusive mindset’ as a brand.

Some industries may benefit more by following WCAG norms. Those in e-tail / FMCG / e-learning might experience an increased customer base when they follow inclusive norms.

 

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Read full article at Source: WCAG – Quick Facts and Guide – Hurix Digital

HTML For Screen Readers – Labelling Elements

To screen readers, a lot of the visual information that is presented on a webpage is lost. Because of this, we need to specifically provide information to them that may be obvious to a person looking at the page.

One common way people define information specifically for screen readers is to wrap the descriptive text in an element with a particular class, such as .screen-reader-text, and hide the element using a method that keeps it visible to screen readers.

Although this does work, we can use ARIA attrib…

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Read full article at Source: HTML For Screen Readers – Labelling Elements

3D-printed Nintendo Switch peripheral is huge for gaming accessibility

An engineer is helping to make playing Nintendo Switch a lot more accessible for gamers everywhere.

Engineer Julio Vazquez created two 3D-printed peripherals for the Nintendo Switch’s Joy-Con controllers, allowing players who only have the use of one hand to play Switch games more easily.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vazquez created the design on the right in April, which puts the two Joy-Cons right next to each other, effectively closing the gap that the standard Joy-Con grip creates and making it easier for players to reach every button.

But some games with more complex control schemes, like The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, require more simultaneous button and joystick interaction though, so Vazquez also created the design on the left.

Vazquez says he was inspired to create the single-hand Joy-Con adapters by his friend who lost his ability to use his right hand.

Source

Inclusive – Microsoft Design

Inclusive Design at Microsoft

It’s in our mission statement: empower every person on the planet to achieve more. Designing for inclusivity opens up our experiences and reflects how people adapt to the world around them.

Our inclusive design principles

Recognize exclusion

Exclusion happens when we solve problems using our own biases. As Microsoft designers, we seek out those exclusions, and use them as opportunities to create new ideas and inclusive designs.

Learn from diversity

Human beings are the real experts in adapting to diversity. Inclusive design puts people in the center from the very start of the process, and those fresh, diverse perspectives are the key to true insight.

Solve for one, extend to many

Everyone has abilities, and limits to those abilities. Designing for people with permanent disabilities actually results in designs that benefit people universally. Constraints are a beautiful thing.

Inclusive: A Microsoft design toolkit

The toolkit is a comprehensive resource for any inclusive session you want to lead. Practice new skills, develop new concepts, or create a prototype – the toolkit is made to be retrofitted to your design team’s goals. Download everything here, and start exploring!

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Read full article at Source: Inclusive – Microsoft Design

An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query | CSS-Tricks

A brief history of Reduced Motion

When it was released in 2013, iOS 7 featured a dramatic reworking of the operating system’s visuals. Changes included translucency and blurring, a more simplified “flat” user interface, and dramatic motion effects such as full-screen zooming and panning.

While the new look was largely accepted, some people using the updated operating system reported experiencing motion sickness and vertigo. User interface movement didn’t correspond with users’ feeling of movement or spatial orientation, triggering the reported effects.

Although technology unintentionally inflicting adverse effects has existed before this, the popularity of iOS gave the issue prominence. Apple has great support for accessibility, so an option in the operating system preferences to disable motion effects for those with vestibular disorders was added in response.

#Enter a new media query

Safari 10.1 introduced the Reduced Motion Media Query. It is a non-vendor-prefixed declaration that allows developers to “create styles that avoid large areas of motion for users that specify a preference for reduced motion in System Preferences.”

The syntax is pretty straightforward:

/* Applies styles when Reduced Motion is enabled */
@media screen and (prefers-reduced-motion: reduce) { }

@media screen and (prefers-reduced-motion) { }

Safari will parse this code and apply it to your site, letting you provide an alternative experience for users who have the Reduced Motion option enabled.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query | CSS-Tricks

How icons are ruining interfaces – Axess Lab

Four icons that are hard to interpret. Last one a sick zombie.

Icons used correctly can enhance both the user experience and look of your interface. Sadly, more and more designers are using them in the wrong way. And it’s hurting both the usability and accessibility of the interface.

MY DAD AND HIS TED APP

I love to watch my dad use technology. It’s such a great learning experience for me as an interaction designer.

He is 57, wears glasses when reading and always delays getting a new phone until his old one completely stops working. You see, he does not like to learn new technology. He just wants his stuff to do what he needs it to do without having to think.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How icons are ruining interfaces – Axess Lab

Does fashion care about disabled people and the purple pound?

Britain’s disabled population has a spending power of £80bn, yet, as a frustrating shopping trip to Mayfair proved, many clothes shops are completely inaccessible

Kelly Knox modelling Teatum Jones AW17Catherine Teatum and Rob Jones have a positive understanding of practical issues affecting disabled shoppers.

Britain’s disabled population has a spending power of £80bn, yet, as a frustrating shopping trip to Mayfair proved, many clothes shops are completely inaccessible

 …
Since childhood, fashion has always given me joy. It has allowed me to present myself to the world as the person I am and strive to be, irrespective of the physical limitations of my disability. But in the five years since severe illness forced me to use a mobility scooter to get around, online retailers have become my primary access to new trends, owing to poor accessibility on my local high street. Recently, I heard about a disability charity’s campaign to improve shop access and wondered whether navigating luxury fashion stores on four wheels would be any less challenging. It seemed logical that designer labels, which often shell out millions to create opulent showrooms, would invest in basic equipment for access. So I ventured into Mayfair – one of London’s most expensive areas to shop – to explore the AW17 collections up close.

From the moment I rode out on to New Bond Street, I was beset by obstacles. It started with attempting to enter a designer store with a stepped entrance, then performing a red-faced U-turn outside because sales staff couldn’t provide a ramp.

As I continued around Mayfair, I discovered boutique after boutique with stepped entrances and no access ramps. Often staff delivered this information with an expression of bewilderment as to why anyone would require one, and nearly half of the shops I visited said they didn’t have lifts to access upper floors.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Does fashion care about disabled people and the purple pound? | Global | The Guardian

A better world for wheels on Google Maps

Starting today, we’re calling on Local Guides, a community of people who contribute their expertise about places on Google Maps, to add more wheelchair accessibility attributes to the map. If each of our tens of millions of Local Guides answers three of these questions every day for two weeks, we can gather nearly two billion answers to help people who rely on this information every day.

More than 65 million people worldwide need wheelchairs. I became one of them after an accident eight years ago, and I discovered what it’s like to navigate the world on wheels.

As I learned, those of us with mobility issues need information about places before we arrive. Does the art museum have a stair-free entrance? What about the cafe across the street? And is there an accessible restroom at that new restaurant?

Google Maps now offers answers that allow me—and millions of others on wheels—to find accessible places. Because anyone can identify and label wheelchair-friendly locations directly on the map, it’s easy to share this knowledge around the world. But not everyone knows this tool exists, so we want to do more.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: A better world for wheels on Google Maps