Category Archives: accessibility

Accessibility according to actual people with disabilities

“If you have a disability, what’s the hardest thing about browsing the web?” The answers to Safia Abdalla’s tweet are truly eye-opening and shows us what web accessibility should really be about.

 In this article I’ll summarize and group the main topics that people bring up in the thread.But do click on the tweet and read through all the answers. It’s an awesome read for anyone interested in making the web a better place for all. And, in my opinion, a far better place to learn about accessibility than reading any checklist or standard.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility according to actual people with disabilities – Axess Lab

At this month’s WWDC, Apple unveiled refined accessibility tools

…for all the focus on refinement, there also is a cavalcade of new stuff to be excited about. As it pertains to accessibility, some obvious highlights for me are the 10.5” iPad Pro and the corresponding iPad-centric enhancements in iOS 11. I’m also psyched for smaller niceties too, such as the ability to automatically enter Reader View in Safari on iOS and macOS. I use this mode all the time; it makes reading on the web a much more pleasant—and accessible!—experience. Reader View is one of my favorite and most-used tools on both iOS and the Mac.

Apple announced a boatload of stuff at WWDC, and it’s quite a task to process it all and ruminate on what it means. With this sentiment in mind, here are my three biggest takeaways around accessibility and the conference that matter most.

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: At this month’s WWDC, Apple unveiled refined accessibility tools | TechCrunch

Google Maps now lets users add wheelchair accessibility details for locations 

Back in December, Google finally added accessibility details to Maps. It was a long awaited addition, but an extremely welcome one for the more than three million people in the U.S. who require wheelchair accessibility. As we noted at the time, however, the available information still left a lot to be desired. Maps has currently collected accessibility data for almost seven million places, but even with databases like Wheelmap, there were still some pretty big gaps across the country.This week, Google’s l

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Google Maps now lets users add wheelchair accessibility details for locations | TechCrunch

The web is awesome and everyone should be able to read it.

These last months I’ve been improving my website accessibility so anyone can understand it. Here’s what I’ve learned:
By anyone I mean any person that doesn’t use the internet like I do. Having empathy with the users is one of the things I’ve been learning on web development. You should give it a try as well. Not everyone interacts with an interface or uses the same device and input devices as you do.
Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within the other person’s frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in another’s position. — wikipedia
So you should adapt your product for them. By adapting I don’t mean making it uglier. I mean making it simple. And doing something simple is hard. It’s good to force yourself to rethink your interface or logic in order to accomplish a more complete and intuitive solution.

That old lady being awesome on the web
The problem
I love to explore new interactive ways to communicate a message, so last Summer I rethought my personal website. I don’t consider it a straightforward portfolio, as interaction is the way to explore it. That’s the best part about it and at the same time the worst part.
Some months ago I got to know that users who use only keyboard or screen readers can’t understand shit. They have so many visual and interactive elements to explore that they end up lost. As a web lover, excluding people from using it to its fullest potential, just makes me really sad.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The web is awesome and everyone should be able to read it.

Semantic HTML: The Unbearable Rightness of Being

This is the fourth post in a series on accessibility from Shopify’s UX team. We’re publishing posts every two weeks. Check out the introduction.

Using valid, semantic HTML is one of the most impactful ways to make your site more accessible. Writing semantic HTML means using the HTML element with the most specific, correct meaning for your task. For example, if you’re building a button, use a <button> element. With CSS and JavaScript you could make just about any element, e.g. a <div>, look like a button, but it won’t be a button.

This being is the reason semantic HTML is important for accessibility. Browsers have different behaviour depending on what an element is, not what it looks like. These differences can have a big impact on user experience.

How semantic HTML affects users

Consider this example (also available as a CodePen):

<div class="btn" onclick="alert('something')">do something</div>
<a href="#" class="btn" onclick="alert('something')">do something</a>
<button type="button" class="btn" onclick="alert('something')">do something</button>

 

 

Curated by (Lifekludger) Read full article at Source

The a11y Monthly: get rid of your tables (or fix them) 

While the original intended use of HTML tables was tabular data, tables are also used as aids for page layout. This was especially true some years ago when browsers hardly supported CSS. Tables were necessary to overcome limitations in visual presentation. Today, there is much more flexibility in controlling page layout using CSS. Does it still make sense to use layout tables? From an accessibility perspective, are layout tables good or bad? Any myths and misconceptions to debunk? At Yoast, we’ve decided to get rid of the few layout tables still used in our plugins.

We’re working hard on making the web and our products as accessible as possible for everyone. We believe every single individual on this planet has a right to accessible web content and we have to lead by example. Since so much of our work goes on behind the scenes, we’re publishing this monthly series of blog posts to keep you posted on this important part of our work.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The a11y Monthly: get rid of your tables (or fix them) • Yoast Dev Blog

Accessibility features in macOS and iOS that everyone should try

iphone mac pixabayIf you’re someone who doesn’t have any specific reasons to go there, you may have never explored the Accessibility settings on your Mac, iPhone, or iPad. While it’s true that those settings are there primarily for people who have special physical needs to modify how a device’s interface works, the fact is, many people who don’t consider themselves in need of any sort of accommodation can find something of value in these settings.

Accessibility has become a place where Apple buries some specific, nitpicky details about how its devices behave–and that’s why you should take a stroll through those settings sometime just to see if they solve problems you didn’t even realize were solvable. Here are some of my favorites:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source

How Design for Accessibility Drives Innovation for All

Comcast recently made a big splash in the world of assistive technology by launching the industry’s first voice-enabled television user interface, or “talking TV guide,” which gives blind and visually impaired customers the ability to independently explore and navigate thousands of shows and movies.

Comcast’s vice president of accessibility Tom Wlodkowski, who is blind, said the new interface “is as much about usability as it is about accessibility.”

Eminently more usable than navigating a complicated channel grid, voice command also comes in handy for people with sight.

Think about the multitaskers who don’t have their hands free to manipulate a remote control – the laundry folders, the moms who’re nursing babies, the social media surfers.

Aging populations also benefit greatly from voice user interfaces.

What Accessibility Has To Do With Usability

Realizing that products designed for accessibility end up making life better for everyone else, Comcast launched an accessibility lab to drive research and development. I heard Wlodkowski give an inspiring presentation about accessibility and innovation at the 2016 Forge Conference and it got me thinking about how the desire to address disability drives innovation forward.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How Design for Accessibility Drives Innovation for All | Bresslergroup

Learn How to Use ChromeVox Next Screen Reader [Videos]

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www­.lireo­.com – When Chrome 56 was released in January 2017, people were excited with the new features, including:

 

One of the new features I think many people may have overlooked in Chrome 56 was the new ChromeVox…

Key Takeaways from the Videos

  • Turn on (and off) ChromeVox Next by holding down the CTRL + ALT keys and pressing the Z key
  • The search key on the Chromebook keyboard is the ChromeVox modifier key (often called ChromeVox in the commands). It’s used in combination with other keys to help you navigate pages.
  • In Learn Mode (press ChromeVox + O + K), you can hear the name of each key you press (or if you’re pressing multiple keys for a command, you’ll hear the command name)
  • Close a browser tab using CTRL + W
  • Temporarily silence speech by pressing CTRL
  • You can navigate a page linearly, using jump commands, or with ChromeVox menus
  • Access the new ChromeVox menus feature using ChromeVox + . (period)
  • If you enable Sticky Mode (double-tap the search key quickly), you don’t have to use the search key for your commands (turn Sticky Mode off by double-tapping the search key quickly)

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Learn How to Use ChromeVox Next Screen Reader [Videos]

The 7 Factors that Influence User Experience 

User Experience (UX) is critical to the success or failure of a product in the market but what do we mean by UX? All too often UX is confused with usability which describes to some extent how easy a product is to use and it is true that UX as a discipline began with usability – however, UX has grown to accommodate rather more than usability and it is important to pay attention to all facets of the user experience in order to deliver successful products to market.

There are 7 factors that describe user experience, according to Peter Morville a pioneer in the UX field who was written several best-selling books and advises many Fortune 500 companies on UX:

  • Useful
  • Usable
  • Findable
  • Credible
  • Desirable
  • Accessible
  • Valuable

Let’s take a look at each factor in turn and what it means for the overall user experience:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The 7 Factors that Influence User Experience | Interaction Design Foundation