Category Archives: app

An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query | CSS-Tricks

A brief history of Reduced Motion

When it was released in 2013, iOS 7 featured a dramatic reworking of the operating system’s visuals. Changes included translucency and blurring, a more simplified “flat” user interface, and dramatic motion effects such as full-screen zooming and panning.

While the new look was largely accepted, some people using the updated operating system reported experiencing motion sickness and vertigo. User interface movement didn’t correspond with users’ feeling of movement or spatial orientation, triggering the reported effects.

Although technology unintentionally inflicting adverse effects has existed before this, the popularity of iOS gave the issue prominence. Apple has great support for accessibility, so an option in the operating system preferences to disable motion effects for those with vestibular disorders was added in response.

#Enter a new media query

Safari 10.1 introduced the Reduced Motion Media Query. It is a non-vendor-prefixed declaration that allows developers to “create styles that avoid large areas of motion for users that specify a preference for reduced motion in System Preferences.”

The syntax is pretty straightforward:

/* Applies styles when Reduced Motion is enabled */
@media screen and (prefers-reduced-motion: reduce) { }

@media screen and (prefers-reduced-motion) { }

Safari will parse this code and apply it to your site, letting you provide an alternative experience for users who have the Reduced Motion option enabled.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query | CSS-Tricks

ARIA Labels and Relationships  |  Web  |  Google Developers

using aria-label to identify an image only buttonLabels

ARIA provides several mechanisms for adding labels and descriptions to elements. In fact, ARIA is the only way to add accessible help or description text. Let’s look at the properties ARIA uses to create accessible labels.

aria-label

aria-label allows us to specify a string to be used as the accessible label. This overrides any other native labeling mechanism, such as a label element — for example, if a button has both text content and an aria-label, only the aria-label value will be used.

You might use an aria-label attribute when you have some kind of visual indication of an element’s purpose, such as a button that uses a graphic instead of text, but still need to clarify that purpose for anyone who cannot access the visual indication, such as a button that uses only an image to indicate its purpose.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: ARIA Labels and Relationships  |  Web  |  Google Developers

At this month’s WWDC, Apple unveiled refined accessibility tools

…for all the focus on refinement, there also is a cavalcade of new stuff to be excited about. As it pertains to accessibility, some obvious highlights for me are the 10.5” iPad Pro and the corresponding iPad-centric enhancements in iOS 11. I’m also psyched for smaller niceties too, such as the ability to automatically enter Reader View in Safari on iOS and macOS. I use this mode all the time; it makes reading on the web a much more pleasant—and accessible!—experience. Reader View is one of my favorite and most-used tools on both iOS and the Mac.

Apple announced a boatload of stuff at WWDC, and it’s quite a task to process it all and ruminate on what it means. With this sentiment in mind, here are my three biggest takeaways around accessibility and the conference that matter most.

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: At this month’s WWDC, Apple unveiled refined accessibility tools | TechCrunch

Microsoft app that tells the visually impaired what’s in front of them

This free app is helping the visually impaired  

Microsoft is putting its artificial intelligence technology to work to help the visually impaired.

The company said on Wednesday that it’s releasing an iOS app called Seeing AI that uses an iPhone’s camera to tell people about objects in front of them. The app shows off Microsoft’s current capabilities in AI, while also addressing a group that the technology industry too often ignores.

Microsoft first revealed the technology to an audience of developers last year, but at the time it was only shown as working on smart glasses. Now anyone with an iPhone or iPad can try it…

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source

Learn How to Use ChromeVox Next Screen Reader [Videos]

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www­.lireo­.com – When Chrome 56 was released in January 2017, people were excited with the new features, including:

 

One of the new features I think many people may have overlooked in Chrome 56 was the new ChromeVox…

Key Takeaways from the Videos

  • Turn on (and off) ChromeVox Next by holding down the CTRL + ALT keys and pressing the Z key
  • The search key on the Chromebook keyboard is the ChromeVox modifier key (often called ChromeVox in the commands). It’s used in combination with other keys to help you navigate pages.
  • In Learn Mode (press ChromeVox + O + K), you can hear the name of each key you press (or if you’re pressing multiple keys for a command, you’ll hear the command name)
  • Close a browser tab using CTRL + W
  • Temporarily silence speech by pressing CTRL
  • You can navigate a page linearly, using jump commands, or with ChromeVox menus
  • Access the new ChromeVox menus feature using ChromeVox + . (period)
  • If you enable Sticky Mode (double-tap the search key quickly), you don’t have to use the search key for your commands (turn Sticky Mode off by double-tapping the search key quickly)

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Learn How to Use ChromeVox Next Screen Reader [Videos]

The 7 Factors that Influence User Experience 

User Experience (UX) is critical to the success or failure of a product in the market but what do we mean by UX? All too often UX is confused with usability which describes to some extent how easy a product is to use and it is true that UX as a discipline began with usability – however, UX has grown to accommodate rather more than usability and it is important to pay attention to all facets of the user experience in order to deliver successful products to market.

There are 7 factors that describe user experience, according to Peter Morville a pioneer in the UX field who was written several best-selling books and advises many Fortune 500 companies on UX:

  • Useful
  • Usable
  • Findable
  • Credible
  • Desirable
  • Accessible
  • Valuable

Let’s take a look at each factor in turn and what it means for the overall user experience:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The 7 Factors that Influence User Experience | Interaction Design Foundation

Airpoly Vision us a Truly Visionary App

Image of Aipoly Vision logo

‘Aipoly Vision’ is a very useful object-and-colour recogniser app that helps the blind, vision-impaired, and colour blind to understand their surroundings. It does so by using artificial intelligence to recognise objects through a device’s camera and then announces the name of each object to the user.

The Aipoly(link is external) developers are on a self-declared mission to build scalable vision intelligence. They intend to add facial recognition to the Aipoly Vision app, whereby users will be able to enter the names of people visible in the camera frame for ongoing recognition. They have also indicated that the app will soon be able to be taught new objects. When pointed at an object which is not recognised, users will be able to enter the name of the object which will be remembered the next time that object is encountered.

This app is an excellent example of how emerging technology can make a positive difference to users right now, and it comes with an ‘intelligent torch’ feature which automatically turns on the device’s torch if the camera frame is too dark, allowing the app to work in low-light situations.

Curated by lifekludger

Read full article at source 

How a Smart Home Empowers People with Disabilities

While advances in personal technology continue at a rapid pace, at times their designers seem to forget about the population that could perhaps benefit from it the most. Stabelfeldt says just the ability to charge a phone with a wheelchair didn’t even exist until a few years ago.

But features like Apple’s “Home” app allow Stabelfeldt to control a variety of smart accessories in his house — from door locks and window shades, to lights and his garage door. The best part for Stabelfeldt? He can command Apple’s intelligent digital assistant Siri to work it all.


A Game Changer
“We put a lot of time and effort into making sure our products are as accessible as possible for all users,” said Apple’s Sarah Herrlinger. She has worked at Apple for nearly 14 years and is their Senior Manager of accessibility policy and initiatives.

“For some people, doing something like turning on your lights or opening a blind or changing your thermostat might be seen as a convenience, but for others, that represents empowerment, and independence, and dignity,” she told NBC News.

“HomeKit and Switch Control and Siri have given me a lot of value and a lot of opportunities to demonstrate that I’m a quality man and I’m a man of integrity,” Todd Stabelfeldt. “To get up every day and go to work: Everybody’s valuable, everybody has worth, everybody should have the opportunity to demonstrate it.”

JAWS screen reader gets more bight

Image of JAWS screen reader logo

Freedom Scientific has recently released JAWS 18.0.2738, which incorporates several important improvements made between the JAWS February 2017 release and this mid April 2017 update, plus dozens of less revolutionary but very practical enhancements.

JAWS (Job Access With Speech) is the world’s most popular screen reader, developed for computer users whose vision loss prevents them from seeing screen content or navigating with a mouse. It allows blind and vision-impaired people to read the screen either with a text-to-speech output or by a refreshable Braille display.

The latest update resolved some minor issues within the software itself, as well as providing a long list of user enhancements and expanded features when using JAWS with Microsoft Office, Google Docs, on a variety of Web Browsers, and in Windows 10.

Source: JAWS screen reader gets more bight | Media Access Australia