Category Archives: design

Inclusive – Microsoft Design

Inclusive Design at Microsoft

It’s in our mission statement: empower every person on the planet to achieve more. Designing for inclusivity opens up our experiences and reflects how people adapt to the world around them.

Our inclusive design principles

Recognize exclusion

Exclusion happens when we solve problems using our own biases. As Microsoft designers, we seek out those exclusions, and use them as opportunities to create new ideas and inclusive designs.

Learn from diversity

Human beings are the real experts in adapting to diversity. Inclusive design puts people in the center from the very start of the process, and those fresh, diverse perspectives are the key to true insight.

Solve for one, extend to many

Everyone has abilities, and limits to those abilities. Designing for people with permanent disabilities actually results in designs that benefit people universally. Constraints are a beautiful thing.

Inclusive: A Microsoft design toolkit

The toolkit is a comprehensive resource for any inclusive session you want to lead. Practice new skills, develop new concepts, or create a prototype – the toolkit is made to be retrofitted to your design team’s goals. Download everything here, and start exploring!

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Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Inclusive – Microsoft Design

An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query | CSS-Tricks

A brief history of Reduced Motion

When it was released in 2013, iOS 7 featured a dramatic reworking of the operating system’s visuals. Changes included translucency and blurring, a more simplified “flat” user interface, and dramatic motion effects such as full-screen zooming and panning.

While the new look was largely accepted, some people using the updated operating system reported experiencing motion sickness and vertigo. User interface movement didn’t correspond with users’ feeling of movement or spatial orientation, triggering the reported effects.

Although technology unintentionally inflicting adverse effects has existed before this, the popularity of iOS gave the issue prominence. Apple has great support for accessibility, so an option in the operating system preferences to disable motion effects for those with vestibular disorders was added in response.

#Enter a new media query

Safari 10.1 introduced the Reduced Motion Media Query. It is a non-vendor-prefixed declaration that allows developers to “create styles that avoid large areas of motion for users that specify a preference for reduced motion in System Preferences.”

The syntax is pretty straightforward:

/* Applies styles when Reduced Motion is enabled */
@media screen and (prefers-reduced-motion: reduce) { }

@media screen and (prefers-reduced-motion) { }

Safari will parse this code and apply it to your site, letting you provide an alternative experience for users who have the Reduced Motion option enabled.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query | CSS-Tricks

How icons are ruining interfaces – Axess Lab

Four icons that are hard to interpret. Last one a sick zombie.

Icons used correctly can enhance both the user experience and look of your interface. Sadly, more and more designers are using them in the wrong way. And it’s hurting both the usability and accessibility of the interface.

MY DAD AND HIS TED APP

I love to watch my dad use technology. It’s such a great learning experience for me as an interaction designer.

He is 57, wears glasses when reading and always delays getting a new phone until his old one completely stops working. You see, he does not like to learn new technology. He just wants his stuff to do what he needs it to do without having to think.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How icons are ruining interfaces – Axess Lab

Accessibility for Software and Devices | Microsoft

Our commitment to accessibility Microsoft’s mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more. With over 1 billion people with disabilities in the world, we’re passionate about ensuring that our products and services are designed for people of all abilities. We are committed to transparency, accountability, and inclusion in our products and our culture, and we are deeply inspired by the opportunity to work with others around the world to explore what’s possible. There a …

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility for Software and Devices | Microsoft

Colorblind-friendly ‘Uno’ cards

In the game of Uno, knowing the color of a card is just as important as knowing its number, which means some colorblind players can be at a serious disadvantage. But now Mattel is fixing that — the company just announced a new accessible version of Uno, made with ColorADD cards.

Here’s a key that explains how the symbols work with the Uno cards and other colors:

IMAGE: MATTEL

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at source.

Accessibility and the Digital Service Standard | Digital Transformation Agency

Post-it notes with graphic representations of different disabilities

Accessibility has been a government priority for many years.

The release of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines version 2.0 (or WCAG 2.0) set a new standard for accessibility. But for those of us who work in government, there is more to consider.

Accessibility must go beyond the technical requirements. As I covered in my presentation for Inclusive Design 24, for a product or service to be accessible it must consider all users’ needs at every stage of development.

The Digital Service Standard has been designed with accessibility as a core focus. It aims to help make government services easier, simpler and faster for all users — including those with disability. By understanding and addressing user needs, we improve the user experience for everyone.

The Digital Service Standard continues to require WCAG 2.0 conformance for all government digital services. But, it also requires teams to go further.

The Digital Service Standard

The Digital Service Standard applies to all new and redesigned government services (informational and transactional) and all existing high volume transactional services. …

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility and the Digital Service Standard | Digital Transformation Agency

Essential Color Tools for UX Designers

Essential Color Tools for UX Designers

Color is one of the most powerful tools in the designer’s toolkit. At the same time, color is a tricky concept to master — with an infinite number of possible color combinations out there, it can be hard to decide what colors to use on your site or app. To make things easier, I’ve created a list of the best tools for choosing color palettes. I’m sure they will save you a lot of time. In this article you’ll find tools that will help you:

  • Find inspiration
  • Create your own color scheme
  • Make color scheme accessible

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Essential Color Tools for UX Designers – UX Planet