Category Archives: environment

Event Websites Need to Have Accessibility Info – Scrappy Deviation

I’ve done a few reviews of events now, and I intend to do more in the future. Some have focused specifically on accessibility issues, while others have included them along with other discussions of the events.

On both of the event reviews I have done on The Orbit I noted that the events DID have a harassment policy on those sites, which were easy to find. This is likely because social justice communities have demanded harassment policies for years and many well known people will not speak at events that do not have those polices highly visible on their websites.

Attendees need accessibility information.

Neither event had accessibility information on their websites. To be blunt, I want this to become as unacceptable as having no harassment policy.

So what should a small event include on their website?

The most important thing is to be honest. If someone is told the event they’re attending is wheelchair accessible, but they arrive and find steps leading to the entrance, they’re going to have a bad time. So be as honest as you reasonably can about barriers that may exist for people, while still working to remove any barriers you can.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Event Websites Need to Have Accessibility Info – Scrappy Deviation

Learning Is For Everyone: Instructional Design For Accessibility (Free Technical Article!) – eLearning Industry

Instructional Design For Accessibility: How To Ensure That Learning Is For Everyone Designing eLearning that is accessible for people with disabilities isn’t easy. The key is to find ways in which basic principles of good web design, along with the principles of Universal Design, can improve access to and the experience of eLearning for all learners, regardless of ability. In Learning Is For Everyone: Instructional Design For Accessibility free technical article, Obsidian Learning examines several importa

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Read full article at Source: Learning Is For Everyone: Instructional Design For Accessibility (Free Technical Article!) – eLearning Industry

Google’s Latest Accessibility Feature Is So Good, Everyone Will Use It | Co.Design | business + design

Google’s Latest Accessibility Feature Is So Good, Everyone Will Use It

Though it was developed for users with severe motor impairment, Voice Access could revolutionize how anyone uses their phone.

Announced this week at I/O 2016 as something that will ship with Android N, Voice Access is a way for people with severe motor impairment to control every aspect of their phones using their voices. But once you see it in action, the broader impact of Voice Access is immediately obvious.


Here’s how it works. When Voice Access is installed, you can enable it with Android’s “Okay Google” command by just saying: “Okay Google, turn on Voice Access.” Once it’s on, it’s always listening—and you don’t have to use the Okay Google command anymore. With Voice Access, all of the UI elements that are normally tap targets are overlaid by a series of numbers. You can tell Voice Access to “tap” these targets by saying the corresponding number aloud.

But these numbers are actually meant to serve as a backup method of control: You can also just tell Voice Assistant what you want to do. For example, you could ask it to “open camera,” and then tell it to “tap shutter.” Best of all? Any app should work with Voice Access, as long as it’s already following Google’s accessibility guidelines.

Technically, Voice Access builds upon two things that Google’s been laying the groundwork on for a while now. The first is natural language processing, which allows Google Assistant to understand your voice.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Google’s Latest Accessibility Feature Is So Good, Everyone Will Use It | Co.Design | business + design

Mobile Apps Like Uber and Airbnb Raise Novel ADA Title III Issues

Are online-only businesses like Uber and Airbnb covered by Title III of the ADA, and what would coverage mean when the businesses don’t own or operate the vehicles or accommodations that customers use?

Title III of the ADA only applies to owners, operators, lessors, and lessees of “place[s] of public accommodations.” Businesses such as Uber and Airbnb do not fit neatly fit into this definition because, as web-only businesses, they are not actual “places” of public accommodation.  Moreover, they don’t own, operate, or the goods or services – the vehicles or accommodations – used by the end customer.

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Read full article at Source: Mobile Apps Like Uber and Airbnb Raise Novel ADA Title III Issues | ADA Title III News & Insights

Why accessibility is good for business (according to my mechanic) » Simply Accessible

I was lucky to find my mechanic, Pete. There was only one problem. A single, 6” step that stood between my wheelchair and his garage.

There was only one problem.

A single, 6” step that stood between my wheelchair and Pete’s office. Most people wouldn’t even notice, but it was enough of a hindrance that I couldn’t get into the garage.

Each time I needed to have work done on my car, I’d have to call ahead and make sure Pete or one of his employees could meet me in the yard to discuss the issues with my car, get the keys, or arrange payment.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Why accessibility is good for business (according to my mechanic) » Simply Accessible

National Gallery’s Tom Roberts’ Auslan captioning app helps hearing impaired art-lovers

Visiting an art gallery would seem a predominantly visual experience, but while most art-lovers can expand their knowledge with an audio tour, people who are deaf or hearing impaired usually miss out.

Thanks to new captioning and Auslan tours for the National Gallery’s Tom Roberts’ exhibition, art-lovers of all abilities can find out the secrets behind the masterpieces, all from the palm of their hand.The tours are available to download for free on the Open Access Tours app, alongside similar versions for some of Australia’s most popular arts and cultural venues.

Hearing impaired and deaf art-lovers can find out more information about the artworks in the NGA’s Tom Roberts’ show thanks to the Open Access Tours app. Photo: Graham TidyHearing impaired gallery regular Haydn Daw said the captioning takes the pressure off for visitors straining to hear audio commentary.

“If you can read it it’s so much more relaxing and you can get the story right,” he said.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: National Gallery’s Tom Roberts’ Auslan captioning app helps hearing impaired art-lovers

Grand Rapids YMCA first building to adopt universal design standards

…how do you design a new building to ensure that it serves the needs of all users? Inclusive design can make that happen.

UB’s Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (IDeA Center), in collaboration with the Global Universal Design Commission, has developed the first set of universal design certification standards for commercial buildings, looking to the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) guidelines as a model.

The first facility to adopt these standards and become certified — the Mary Free Bed YMCA in Grand Rapids, Michigan — opened its doors to the public Dec. 7.

The IDeA Center, which is housed in the School of Architecture and Planning, started developing the universal design guidelines in 2009.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
– See more at: http://www.buffalo.edu/ubreporter/research/news.host.html/content/shared/university/news/ub-reporter-articles/stories/2016/01/ymca_universal_design.detail.html#sthash.jpWmZkGO.qTj72oA6.dpuf

Changing Places: Meet Vaila Morrison, Architect and a woman on a mission to champion inclusive design and improve quality of life through better accessibility – Womanthology

Meet Vaila Morrison tells Womanthology about championing inclusive design through the Changing Places campaign

Vaila Morrison is an architect with a passion for inclusive design and sustainability. She is not currently practicing as she is also a mum and carer to a young daughter with significant disabilities (attributed to an undiagnosed neurological condition), and a young son. Vaila is busy working on Our Inclusive Home, a project which encourages architects and designers to produce places and spaces which will welcome people of all needs.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Changing Places: Meet Vaila Morrison, Architect and a woman on a mission to champion inclusive design and improve quality of life through better accessibility – Womanthology

Google Maps will now Earmark Places That are Wheel Chair Friendly

Google Maps now has an accessibility feature that tells whether or not a given place is wheelchair friendly. The feature is currently available only in select locations.

Google Maps has been ushering in new features on a regular basis and now the map is aiming to be wheelchair friendly. The maps have picked up a new feature that will tell you whether a particular location is wheelchair friendly or not. One can access this information by tapping on location summary (by tapping on the right arrow mark) and then scrolling down to “Amenities.” Just like the other fields if the place is accessible for folks with wheelchair the check mark next to “Wheelchair accessible entrance” will be marked.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Google Maps will now Earmark Places That are Wheel Chair Friendly

The 7 Principles | Centre for Excellence in Universal Design

The 7 Principles of Universal Design were developed in 1997 by a working group of architects, product designers, engineers and environmental design researchers, led by the late Ronald Mace in the North Carolina State University.

The purpose of the Principles is to guide the design of environments, products and communications. According to the Center for Universal Design in NCSU, the Principles “may be applied to evaluate existing designs, guide the design process and educate both designers and consumers about the characteristics of more usable products and environments.”

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Read full article at Source: The 7 Principles | Centre for Excellence in Universal Design