Category Archives: services

Apple brings AirPod-style streaming, Live Listen accessibility to MFi hearing aids

 

Apple has enhanced its iOS accessibility features for users with hearing impairments, adapting its enhanced Bluetooth-based streaming to Made For iPhone hearing aids while introducing Live Listen, a feature that uses an iPhone’s mic to focus on conversations in loud environments.

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Apple brings AirPod-style streaming, Live Listen accessibility to MFi hearing aids

New accessible purchasing rules for Australian government – Information Access Group

In great news for people with disability, last month the Australian Government announced that all levels of government will adopt an internationally aligned standard for purchasing websites, software and digital devices.

This means that, when governments buy products and services, they must be accessible. …

So, this is a great step forward for inclusion in our country.Of course, we’ll be keen to learn how it stacks up in practice, and it will be the feedback of people with disability that will tell the real story.

The standard that Australia will follow is called ‘Accessibility requirements suitable for public procurement of ICT products and services’ and it is mandated in Europe. You can read the full standard here.

And you can read the government media release here.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: New accessible purchasing rules for government – Information Access Group

NY Slant – Uber and Accessibility

Amid Uber’s rapid unregulated expansion, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and nine other urban mayors have wisely chosen to develop a global rulebook to confront economic and social challenges of the sharing economy. This new coalition has a prime opportunity to finally end Uber’s discrimination against wheelchair users in New York and across the world.

Uber is an example of how the sharing economy has not yet evolved to adequately serve the disability community. While the $60 billion company has just begun to offer accessible vehicles in London, wheelchair users in hundreds of other cities are denied service every day. Twenty-six years after the Americans with Disabilities Act became federal law, Uber’s policies are a sad throwback to a time when those civil rights were simply ignored.

Uber has operated in New York City since 2011 and now has more than 30,000 vehicles on the road, but none are wheelchair-accessible. Even as the city’s taxi industry continues to advance toward 50 percent accessibility by 2020, city officials have not held Uber and other ridesharing apps to the same moral standard. And when the company tried – and failed – to expand statewide, it refused to include accessibility in its so-called commitment to upstate residents.

Uber has avoided discussions of an accessibility mandate at all costs – including more than $1 million spent on lobbying New York officials over the past year and a half. Part of the problem is UberWAV, which, the company claims, is a fair substitute for making its own cars accessible. In reality, it is an offensive response that treats the disability community with the same “separate but equal” attitude that once plagued America’s attitude toward race.

Instead of providing wheelchair users with accessible Uber cars, UberWAV merely attempts to connect them with accessible yellow or green taxis – the same taxis the company is trying to put out of business. The only real benefit of UberWAV is for Uber itself, which rakes in higher corporate profits by leaving the full cost of accessibility to the taxi industry.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: NY Slant