Category Archives: society

We’re just temporarily abled: Designing for the future – InVision Blog

We need to design for accessibility not only for folks who are permanently visually impaired, hard of hearing, or have severe motor issues right now, but also for our future selves.

Design for the future you

With each passing birthday, our vision is starting to go. Eventually our hearing will start to go and so will our mobility. I will have these issues, you will have these issues—they’re just part of the aging process.

We aren’t just designing accessible products and websites for a subgroup of people who we may or may not know, who have permanent visual or motor issues. We’re designing these sites and products for our future selves as well.

The next time you’re tempted to brush off accessibility while you’re working on a design, picture yourself in 20 or 30 years trying to use your own website or product. It’s a pretty life-changing shift in thinking. I like to call it “forced empathy.”

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Read full article at Source: We’re just temporarily abled: Designing for the future – InVision Blog

Advocate Moves Needle on Website Accessibility – Education Week

Every year, thousands of complaints flow into the office tasked with investigating disability discrimination for the U.S. Department of Education.

This year, Marcie Lipsitt, a special education advocate from Michigan, has been responsible for about 500 of those complaints—and counting.

Lipsitt’s focus is on the websites of school districts and other educational institutions, which she says widely disregard the needs of users who are blind or visually impaired, or who cannot use a mouse to navigate a page. Other website problems she has spotted include videos with no captions, or text and background color combinations that are a strain for people with low vision.

Her letters have gotten results. In June, the Education Department’s office for civil rights announced that it had entered into settlement agreements over website accessibility with schools, districts, and departments of education in seven states and in Guam.

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Read full article at Source: Advocate Moves Needle on Website Accessibility – Education Week

Airline Web Accessibility: Post US DOT Deadline Round Up

Round the world in 8 Days We are pleased to say we can conclude our round the world airline accessibility review, having looked at the six airlines (one from each continent) to see how they have approached the new US … Continued

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Read full article at Source: Airline Web Accessibility: Post US DOT Deadline Round Up – User Vision

We’re Just Temporarily Abled : Designing for the Future : Designing for the Future

We aren’t just designing accessible products and websites for a subgroup of people who we may or may not know, who have permanent visual or motor issues. We’re designing these sites and products for our future selves as well.

A few years ago, I had the opportunity to attend and present at a great conference where Cindy Li delivered a phenomenal keynote.I learned about 8 million new things during her talk, but she made one particular statement that really stuck with me.

She simply said,“We’re all just temporarily abled.”

She talked a little bit about her mother who has an ocular disease that is slowly blinding her over time. Then she mentioned that while she doesn’t have an ocular disease herself, she is beginning to require stronger glasses prescriptions each year.

Why am I talking about Cindy’s eye health? Because she then pointed out that as designers we need to design for accessibility, not only for folks who are permanently visually or hearing impaired or have severe motor issues right now, but also for our future selves.

Design for the future you.

With each passing birthday, our vision is starting to go. Eventually our hearing will start to go and so will our mobility. I will have these issues, you will have these issues–they’re just part of the aging process.We aren’t just designing accessible products and websites for a subgroup of people who we may or may not know, who have permanent visual or motor issues. We’re designing these sites and products for our future selves as well.The next time you’re tempted to brush off accessibility while you’re working on a design, picture yourself in 20 or 30 years trying to use your own website or product. It’s a pretty life changing shift in thinking. I like to call it “forced empathy.”

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: We’re Just Temporarily Abled : Designing for the Future : Designing for the Future | UX Magazine

Census 2016 – Accessibility and special needs | Australian Bureau of Statistics

What help is available for people with a disability, illness or injury?

If you need assistance completing your Census form, we encourage you to seek help from someone you trust. This could be a family member, friend, carer or neighbour. In some locations, such as hospitals and nursing homes, Field Officers will be employed to help complete the form.Information collected in the Census helps to determine funding and plan for better health facilities for both patients and carers across Australia.

Information to help people who are deaf or hard of hearing to participate in the Census is available in Australian Sign Language (Auslan) and Close Captioned.

This video provides information on how to complete each Census question in Auslan.

2016 Census in Auslan

Those with hearing or speech impairments requiring help to complete the Census form, please contact the National Relay Service.

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Read full article at Source: Accessibility and special needs | Census | Australian Bureau of Statistics

Universal design for organisations – digital accessibility video – MAA

Through an alliance with Australian Network on Disability (AND), Media Access Australia (MAA) contributed and helped organise the digital accessibility stream of AND’s annual conference, which was held in Sydney on 17 May 2016.

Presentation video

https://youtu.be/kCaRJCAxrNY

Presentation video transcriptRather than hear from Media Access Australia about our services and approach to managing digital accessibility with AND members, we believed that the best engagement for the audience would be achieved by hearing directly from another member.

Natalie Collins, Deputy CEO at MAA was the session facilitator and shared the stage with Sarah Abbott, the Senior Manager, Group Diversity and Inclusion, at Commonwealth Bank.

Sarah outlined the strategies and approaches that they took to gain cut-through, influence, and improve digital accessibility across the organisation, and how universal design principles are changing the way digital services meet the needs of users.

Source: Videos – Media Access Australia

Responses To The Screen Reader Strategy Survey | HeydonWorks

In September of last year, I decided I wanted to hear stories about how screen reader users access The Web. I suspected, as a sighted web user, I made a lot of incorrect assumptions. Accordingly, I composed seven questions to find out about strategies for reading and operation.Following are the raw, unedited responses (minus the occasional typo). I don’t want to editorialize, but let’s just say I learned a lot.

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Read full article at Source: Responses To The Screen Reader Strategy Survey | HeydonWorks

Google’s Latest Accessibility Feature Is So Good, Everyone Will Use It | Co.Design | business + design

Google’s Latest Accessibility Feature Is So Good, Everyone Will Use It

Though it was developed for users with severe motor impairment, Voice Access could revolutionize how anyone uses their phone.

Announced this week at I/O 2016 as something that will ship with Android N, Voice Access is a way for people with severe motor impairment to control every aspect of their phones using their voices. But once you see it in action, the broader impact of Voice Access is immediately obvious.


Here’s how it works. When Voice Access is installed, you can enable it with Android’s “Okay Google” command by just saying: “Okay Google, turn on Voice Access.” Once it’s on, it’s always listening—and you don’t have to use the Okay Google command anymore. With Voice Access, all of the UI elements that are normally tap targets are overlaid by a series of numbers. You can tell Voice Access to “tap” these targets by saying the corresponding number aloud.

But these numbers are actually meant to serve as a backup method of control: You can also just tell Voice Assistant what you want to do. For example, you could ask it to “open camera,” and then tell it to “tap shutter.” Best of all? Any app should work with Voice Access, as long as it’s already following Google’s accessibility guidelines.

Technically, Voice Access builds upon two things that Google’s been laying the groundwork on for a while now. The first is natural language processing, which allows Google Assistant to understand your voice.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Google’s Latest Accessibility Feature Is So Good, Everyone Will Use It | Co.Design | business + design

Accessibility and me: Marian Foley | Accessibility

This blog [post] by Marian Foley is the first in a series of blog posts about people with access needs. The aim of the series is to raise awareness of the different ways people access websites, common issues faced and what designers and developers can do to remove the issues.

Marian Foley, content designer and particular needs IT user spoke to us about the problems she faces, and her solutions. Most importantly, she answers the question – how can we make the web more accessible?

What should content designers and developers be doing?

The most obvious thing for me is to use Responsive Web Design (RWD). This solves the problem of websites not fitting on my screen and I can access the same options as everyone else. Since RWD became mainstream around 2012/13 I’ve been able to use the mobile versions of most websites (including GOV.UK and the backend of GOV.UK). I’m a big fan!

Design accessible websites by:

1 making your layout clear and simple
2 having menus at the top of the page, on the left if possible, so that people using a low resolution find them quickly
3 using .png files for diagrams because they’re transparent; someone using their own colour scheme will see their colour preference as the background colour
4 providing text alongside icons and images to explain what’s going on
5 publishing HTML pages, not .pdf files, because they’re accessible to more users
6 taking alternative text attributes off diagrams and putting them on the page; people who don’t use screen readers but can’t read the text in your image won’t miss out (use “” in the alt text field because you’ll no longer need any)

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Read full article at Source: Accessibility and me: Marian Foley | Accessibility