Category Archives: software

Accessibility for Software and Devices | Microsoft

Our commitment to accessibility Microsoft’s mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more. With over 1 billion people with disabilities in the world, we’re passionate about ensuring that our products and services are designed for people of all abilities. We are committed to transparency, accountability, and inclusion in our products and our culture, and we are deeply inspired by the opportunity to work with others around the world to explore what’s possible. There a …

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Read full article at Source: Accessibility for Software and Devices | Microsoft

Face ID Accessibility. Apple offers some answers

Apple today made a series of hardware announcements.

Understandably, the announcement that has caused the most social media chatter in the blind community relates to the iPhone X, and it’s new Face ID feature.

Apple has earned our trust over the years by ensuring that its products are fully accessible from their initial launch, so few observers were in any doubt that Apple would have given thought to the accessibility of this new feature. However, were there limitations of the technology that simply made it a non-starter for some people?

I wrote to Apple, and quickly received a response to some of my initial questions.

My questions stem from the fact that I am congenitally blind. My particular eye condition causes my eyes to look small and a little sunken, and they are often closed. Further, I have a form of congenital cataracts. I was curious to know whether Face ID would work for someone like me and others I know with prosthetic eyes, given that during the keynote, Apple indicated that the iPhone X would not unlock unless you gave the phone your attention.

Apple says the following.

 

The iPhone X has been designed with a number of accessibility features to support its use.

For VoiceOver users, Face ID will prompt you as to how to move your head during set up in order to complete a scan. If you do not want Face ID to require attention, you can open Settings > General > Accessibility, and disable Require Attention for Face ID. This is automatically disabled if you enable VoiceOver during initial set up.

What’s new with Accessibility in iOS 11?

iOS 11 has some helpful new options in Accessibility to assist any person and everybody customise their iPhone and iPad interface to paintings with them and for them. Here is what’s new.

Sensible Invert

Sensible Invert is a brand new atmosphere to be added to the Invert Colours phase of Accessibility in iOS. While colour inversion inverts the whole lot at the display, Sensible Invert inverts solely the spaces the place it can be deemed vital for somebody who calls for it. Differently, photographs keep true, and different insignificant components of the person interface stay unchanged.

To allow Sensible Invert:

  1. Release Settings out of your House Display screen.
  2. Faucet Common.
  3. Faucet Accessibility
  4. Faucet Show Lodging.
  5. Faucet Invert Colours.
  6. Faucet the transfer subsequent to Sensible Invert.

Auto-brightness

Within the Show Lodging phase of Accessibility, you’ll now get right of entry to the Auto-brightness function to allow or disable it. When enabled, your display will brighten or dim, relying at the lighting fixtures stipulations round you. For those who disable it, it will impact your total battery existence, however would possibly not mess along with your eyes if lighting fixtures stipulations trade .

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: What’s new with Accessibility in iOS 11?

ARIA Labels and Relationships  |  Web  |  Google Developers

using aria-label to identify an image only buttonLabels

ARIA provides several mechanisms for adding labels and descriptions to elements. In fact, ARIA is the only way to add accessible help or description text. Let’s look at the properties ARIA uses to create accessible labels.

aria-label

aria-label allows us to specify a string to be used as the accessible label. This overrides any other native labeling mechanism, such as a label element — for example, if a button has both text content and an aria-label, only the aria-label value will be used.

You might use an aria-label attribute when you have some kind of visual indication of an element’s purpose, such as a button that uses a graphic instead of text, but still need to clarify that purpose for anyone who cannot access the visual indication, such as a button that uses only an image to indicate its purpose.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: ARIA Labels and Relationships  |  Web  |  Google Developers

10 guidelines to improve your web accessibility

We put together a list of ten web accessibility guidelines that will guarantee access to your site to any person, in spite of their disabilities.

There’s a quote by Tim Berners-Lee, Director of W3C and inventor of the World Wide Web, that says, “The power of the web is in its universality”. As people who make a living by making websites, it’s our responsibility to ensure everyone has access to them. Web accessibility seems like a tall order on paper, but it’s definitely much easier than it sounds.

Our ten web accessibility guidelines are designed to ensure that all websites are universal.

This will not only help screen reader users, but will also improve browsing experience for slow connections. We’ve sorted our guidelines by implementation time to give you a clear picture of just how much effort you’ll have to put into this process. Before you get overwhelmed, take our word for it—it’s totally worth it.

First things first:

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Read full article at Source: 10 guidelines to improve your web accessibility | Aerolab

Accessibility | Improvements to the next udpate are already planned

In both the Windows Anniversary and Creators Update, Microsoft has added many new enhancements to features across the operating system to improve accessibility for its customers who have low vision, are blind, have a partial hearing loss or deafness in either or both ears, live with physical disabilities, or need assistance reading text on their computer screen.

All of these efforts and their future focus are based on the companies guiding principles and goals to make all of their products and services more accessible.

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Read full article at Source: Accessibility | Improvements to the next udpate are already planned | Windows 10 content from SuperSite for Windows

Accessibility Testing: Checkers & Development Tools Review

Tools of the Trade

In a different article, I outline the basics foundations of accessibility standards: “Understanding s508 & WCAG 2.0“. To further expand this, let’s look at various development tools to help author accessible content conformant to the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (“WCAG”) 2.0 standards.

Getting Started

For a primer or refresher on what the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) is review the W3 Org website and its associated entries on this subject at https://www.w3.org/WAI/.

Checkers and Tools

W3 Org offers a great list of available tools for developers to use when checking content for accessibility conformance at https://www.w3.org/WAI/ER/tools/. Various filters can be applied to this list, in order to narrow-down best options. For this article, I applied the following filters:

  • Guidelines > WCAG 2.0 – W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0
  • Languages > English
  • License > Free and License > Open Source

From the filtered-list, I chose to explore the following tools/checkers:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source.

 

Semantic HTML: The Unbearable Rightness of Being

This is the fourth post in a series on accessibility from Shopify’s UX team. We’re publishing posts every two weeks. Check out the introduction.

Using valid, semantic HTML is one of the most impactful ways to make your site more accessible. Writing semantic HTML means using the HTML element with the most specific, correct meaning for your task. For example, if you’re building a button, use a <button> element. With CSS and JavaScript you could make just about any element, e.g. a <div>, look like a button, but it won’t be a button.

This being is the reason semantic HTML is important for accessibility. Browsers have different behaviour depending on what an element is, not what it looks like. These differences can have a big impact on user experience.

How semantic HTML affects users

Consider this example (also available as a CodePen):

<div class="btn" onclick="alert('something')">do something</div>
<a href="#" class="btn" onclick="alert('something')">do something</a>
<button type="button" class="btn" onclick="alert('something')">do something</button>

 

 

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The 7 Factors that Influence User Experience 

User Experience (UX) is critical to the success or failure of a product in the market but what do we mean by UX? All too often UX is confused with usability which describes to some extent how easy a product is to use and it is true that UX as a discipline began with usability – however, UX has grown to accommodate rather more than usability and it is important to pay attention to all facets of the user experience in order to deliver successful products to market.

There are 7 factors that describe user experience, according to Peter Morville a pioneer in the UX field who was written several best-selling books and advises many Fortune 500 companies on UX:

  • Useful
  • Usable
  • Findable
  • Credible
  • Desirable
  • Accessible
  • Valuable

Let’s take a look at each factor in turn and what it means for the overall user experience:

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Read full article at Source: The 7 Factors that Influence User Experience | Interaction Design Foundation