Category Archives: software

What Does Inclusive Design Mean?

Why is accessibilty seen as an after-thought, or at worst an expense to help a handful of disadvantaged people?

Have you ever tried using a website or app on your smartphone whilst riding a bus when the sun is streaming through the window? You probably have. How did that work out for you?

…the internet was no longer being consumed solely on a desktop, viewing through a large monitor perched on a desk whilst in a comfortable chair. The iPhone broke a barrier. The web would start – and continues – to push its way into every moment of our day, regardless of what environment (surroundings or situation) you happen to be in.

microsoft inclusive design impairments

It’s lunch time at the Accessibility Scotland Conference and I take a stroll up the road to grab a soda. I find a shop and low and behold a 10cm step. With the challenges that wheelchairs users have fresh in my mind, I looked down, shook my head and walked on in.

The 10cm step

accessibility ramp at shop

On my way out a ramp appears! “Well that solves that”. I am then greeted by a delivery man with a trolley full of supplies for the shop. The ramp belonged to him. He finished his delivery, threw the ramp in the back of his truck and drove away. Leaving me with the 10cm step. So not only would consideration help those we would often think to require the support (those in wheelchairs, those with limited visibility or even those with prams) but it would help the main function of the shop – getting supplies in both quicker and easier – but also be less intrusive to all users.

So, what’s the digital equivalent of the 10cm step?

There’s a few. For example, the contrast between text and background. Dark colours on a light background work well for users with visual impairments but also work well for “able-bodied” users reading a phone with bright sunlight glaring off the screen.

What about the move towards ‘smart homes’ and the invisible interfaces such as Alexa and Siri? How accessible are they? Users that are mute (permanent impairment) or users with laryngitis (temporary impairment) will struggle to communicate with them. But also those, like myself, with a strong accent (situational impairment) that will struggle with these new technologies.

How do we take this forward?

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: What Does Inclusive Design Mean? – Storm ID Blog

21 Chrome Extensions for Special Needs

21 Chrome Extensions for Struggling Students and Special Needs

Technology can be a powerful tool to assist students with special needs or any sort of learning challenge. In particular the Chrome web browser allows users to install a wide variety of web extensions that provide tools that can help all learners, regardless of ability level.In this blog post we will take a look at 21 Chrome web extensions that can assist students in five main categories: Text to Speech, Readability, Reading Comprehension, Focus, Navigation

Some of the tools fit into more than one topic, but each is only listed once. Certainly this list does not cover all of the useful web extensions available for struggling learners, but it is a great place to begin. In addition to the list of extension, I have also linked in the video and help guide from a webinar I did a while back on “Google Tools for Special Needs”.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Control Alt Achieve: 21 Chrome Extensions for Struggling Students and Special Needs

AccessibleTech – Section 508 Explained

I. Introduction

The primary goal of Accessibility is to make certain that Information Systems can be used by people with disabilities.  A properly implemented system will provide access to information to people that use assistive technologies and it will increase usability for everybody. This is due to the fact that most accessible rules one way or another make the system friendlier for use by all.

Accessibility techniques ensure equal access to information for disable and non disable users.  Content and functionality can become fully accessible to people with one or more disabilities including visual, audio, kinetic, speech, and cognitive impairments.

To address these needs the accessibility guidelines are organized around four principles:

  1. Content must be perceivable.
  2. Interface elements in the content must be operable.
  3. Content and controls must be understandable.
  4. Content must be robust enough to work with current and future technologies.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: AccessibleTech – Section 508 Explained

Accessibility for Software and Devices | Microsoft

Our commitment to accessibility Microsoft’s mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more. With over 1 billion people with disabilities in the world, we’re passionate about ensuring that our products and services are designed for people of all abilities. We are committed to transparency, accountability, and inclusion in our products and our culture, and we are deeply inspired by the opportunity to work with others around the world to explore what’s possible. There a …

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Read full article at Source: Accessibility for Software and Devices | Microsoft

Face ID Accessibility. Apple offers some answers

Apple today made a series of hardware announcements.

Understandably, the announcement that has caused the most social media chatter in the blind community relates to the iPhone X, and it’s new Face ID feature.

Apple has earned our trust over the years by ensuring that its products are fully accessible from their initial launch, so few observers were in any doubt that Apple would have given thought to the accessibility of this new feature. However, were there limitations of the technology that simply made it a non-starter for some people?

I wrote to Apple, and quickly received a response to some of my initial questions.

My questions stem from the fact that I am congenitally blind. My particular eye condition causes my eyes to look small and a little sunken, and they are often closed. Further, I have a form of congenital cataracts. I was curious to know whether Face ID would work for someone like me and others I know with prosthetic eyes, given that during the keynote, Apple indicated that the iPhone X would not unlock unless you gave the phone your attention.

Apple says the following.

 

The iPhone X has been designed with a number of accessibility features to support its use.

For VoiceOver users, Face ID will prompt you as to how to move your head during set up in order to complete a scan. If you do not want Face ID to require attention, you can open Settings > General > Accessibility, and disable Require Attention for Face ID. This is automatically disabled if you enable VoiceOver during initial set up.

What’s new with Accessibility in iOS 11?

iOS 11 has some helpful new options in Accessibility to assist any person and everybody customise their iPhone and iPad interface to paintings with them and for them. Here is what’s new.

Sensible Invert

Sensible Invert is a brand new atmosphere to be added to the Invert Colours phase of Accessibility in iOS. While colour inversion inverts the whole lot at the display, Sensible Invert inverts solely the spaces the place it can be deemed vital for somebody who calls for it. Differently, photographs keep true, and different insignificant components of the person interface stay unchanged.

To allow Sensible Invert:

  1. Release Settings out of your House Display screen.
  2. Faucet Common.
  3. Faucet Accessibility
  4. Faucet Show Lodging.
  5. Faucet Invert Colours.
  6. Faucet the transfer subsequent to Sensible Invert.

Auto-brightness

Within the Show Lodging phase of Accessibility, you’ll now get right of entry to the Auto-brightness function to allow or disable it. When enabled, your display will brighten or dim, relying at the lighting fixtures stipulations round you. For those who disable it, it will impact your total battery existence, however would possibly not mess along with your eyes if lighting fixtures stipulations trade .

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: What’s new with Accessibility in iOS 11?

ARIA Labels and Relationships  |  Web  |  Google Developers

using aria-label to identify an image only buttonLabels

ARIA provides several mechanisms for adding labels and descriptions to elements. In fact, ARIA is the only way to add accessible help or description text. Let’s look at the properties ARIA uses to create accessible labels.

aria-label

aria-label allows us to specify a string to be used as the accessible label. This overrides any other native labeling mechanism, such as a label element — for example, if a button has both text content and an aria-label, only the aria-label value will be used.

You might use an aria-label attribute when you have some kind of visual indication of an element’s purpose, such as a button that uses a graphic instead of text, but still need to clarify that purpose for anyone who cannot access the visual indication, such as a button that uses only an image to indicate its purpose.

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Read full article at Source: ARIA Labels and Relationships  |  Web  |  Google Developers

10 guidelines to improve your web accessibility

We put together a list of ten web accessibility guidelines that will guarantee access to your site to any person, in spite of their disabilities.

There’s a quote by Tim Berners-Lee, Director of W3C and inventor of the World Wide Web, that says, “The power of the web is in its universality”. As people who make a living by making websites, it’s our responsibility to ensure everyone has access to them. Web accessibility seems like a tall order on paper, but it’s definitely much easier than it sounds.

Our ten web accessibility guidelines are designed to ensure that all websites are universal.

This will not only help screen reader users, but will also improve browsing experience for slow connections. We’ve sorted our guidelines by implementation time to give you a clear picture of just how much effort you’ll have to put into this process. Before you get overwhelmed, take our word for it—it’s totally worth it.

First things first:

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Read full article at Source: 10 guidelines to improve your web accessibility | Aerolab