Category Archives: tips

Simple tips for easy Word doc accessibility – Media Access Australia

Two men using a phone and a laptop
Two men interacting with documents on a mobile and a laptop

Creating Word documents that can be read and understood by a diverse range of people, is just as vital as creating accessible, inclusive websites and online content. Imagine going to a recruitment website and downloading the Position Description as a Word document, or being sent it as an email attachment, only to find that you cannot access the document using your screen reader (if you are blind or vision-impaired) can’t listen to the linked podcast (if you are Deaf or hearing impaired), or simply can’t understand large sections of it because the document is full of industry jargon that is not explained.

Let’s start with what ‘accessibility’ actually means, when it comes to a Word document. It’s about removing barriers that prevent interaction with, and the understanding of, the contents of a document, so that people of all abilities are not excluded.

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Read full article at Source: Simple tips for easy Word doc accessibility – Media Access Australia

WCAG – Quick Facts and Guide – Hurix Digital

This is how WCAG guidelines help.

The standard Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (version – WCAG 2.0) is a set of rules that defines how to make web or online content more accessible, especially to people who are differently-abled. ‘Accessibility’ here could involve a wide range of limitations, including visual, auditory, physical, speech, cognitive, language, learning, and neurological.

What is it?

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) are part of a series of web accessibility guidelines

Who is it by?

It is published by the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)

In short: These guidelines form the main international standards organization when it comes to the matter of content for the Internet.

Why is it pertinent to follow WCAG guidelines?

Implementation of the WCAG guidelines helps maintain a standard quality of online content that is inclusive and serves the interest of readers with different kinds of special needs. Making a particular brand’s online content WCAG-friendly is required to showcase that you have an ‘inclusive mindset’ as a brand.

Some industries may benefit more by following WCAG norms. Those in e-tail / FMCG / e-learning might experience an increased customer base when they follow inclusive norms.

 

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Read full article at Source: WCAG – Quick Facts and Guide – Hurix Digital

The Accessibility Cheatsheet

We all know that accessibility is important. The problem is, it is not always clear what exactly we can do to make our sites more accessible.

The Web Accessibility Initiative created some Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) targeted at us, web content developers, to create more accessible websites. The WCAG contain some very useful information, and so I decided to condense the very extensive guidelines and highlight some practical examples of what we can do to implement them and make our websites more accessible.

Overview

The guidelines for accessible content have four overarching principles, each with more specific guidelines. You can click on the link to go to the relevant section of this article.

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Read full article at Source: The Accessibility Cheatsheet

An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query | CSS-Tricks

A brief history of Reduced Motion

When it was released in 2013, iOS 7 featured a dramatic reworking of the operating system’s visuals. Changes included translucency and blurring, a more simplified “flat” user interface, and dramatic motion effects such as full-screen zooming and panning.

While the new look was largely accepted, some people using the updated operating system reported experiencing motion sickness and vertigo. User interface movement didn’t correspond with users’ feeling of movement or spatial orientation, triggering the reported effects.

Although technology unintentionally inflicting adverse effects has existed before this, the popularity of iOS gave the issue prominence. Apple has great support for accessibility, so an option in the operating system preferences to disable motion effects for those with vestibular disorders was added in response.

#Enter a new media query

Safari 10.1 introduced the Reduced Motion Media Query. It is a non-vendor-prefixed declaration that allows developers to “create styles that avoid large areas of motion for users that specify a preference for reduced motion in System Preferences.”

The syntax is pretty straightforward:

/* Applies styles when Reduced Motion is enabled */
@media screen and (prefers-reduced-motion: reduce) { }

@media screen and (prefers-reduced-motion) { }

Safari will parse this code and apply it to your site, letting you provide an alternative experience for users who have the Reduced Motion option enabled.

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Read full article at Source: An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query | CSS-Tricks

Face ID Accessibility. Apple offers some answers

Apple today made a series of hardware announcements.

Understandably, the announcement that has caused the most social media chatter in the blind community relates to the iPhone X, and it’s new Face ID feature.

Apple has earned our trust over the years by ensuring that its products are fully accessible from their initial launch, so few observers were in any doubt that Apple would have given thought to the accessibility of this new feature. However, were there limitations of the technology that simply made it a non-starter for some people?

I wrote to Apple, and quickly received a response to some of my initial questions.

My questions stem from the fact that I am congenitally blind. My particular eye condition causes my eyes to look small and a little sunken, and they are often closed. Further, I have a form of congenital cataracts. I was curious to know whether Face ID would work for someone like me and others I know with prosthetic eyes, given that during the keynote, Apple indicated that the iPhone X would not unlock unless you gave the phone your attention.

Apple says the following.

 

The iPhone X has been designed with a number of accessibility features to support its use.

For VoiceOver users, Face ID will prompt you as to how to move your head during set up in order to complete a scan. If you do not want Face ID to require attention, you can open Settings > General > Accessibility, and disable Require Attention for Face ID. This is automatically disabled if you enable VoiceOver during initial set up.

ARIA Labels and Relationships  |  Web  |  Google Developers

using aria-label to identify an image only buttonLabels

ARIA provides several mechanisms for adding labels and descriptions to elements. In fact, ARIA is the only way to add accessible help or description text. Let’s look at the properties ARIA uses to create accessible labels.

aria-label

aria-label allows us to specify a string to be used as the accessible label. This overrides any other native labeling mechanism, such as a label element — for example, if a button has both text content and an aria-label, only the aria-label value will be used.

You might use an aria-label attribute when you have some kind of visual indication of an element’s purpose, such as a button that uses a graphic instead of text, but still need to clarify that purpose for anyone who cannot access the visual indication, such as a button that uses only an image to indicate its purpose.

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Read full article at Source: ARIA Labels and Relationships  |  Web  |  Google Developers

Accessibility features in macOS and iOS that everyone should try

iphone mac pixabay

If you’re someone who doesn’t have any specific reasons to go there, you may have never explored the Accessibility settings on your Mac, iPhone, or iPad. While it’s true that those settings are there primarily for people who have special physical needs to modify how a device’s interface works, the fact is, many people who don’t consider themselves in need of any sort of accommodation can find something of value in these settings.

Accessibility has become a place where Apple buries some specific, nitpicky details about how its devices behave–and that’s why you should take a stroll through those settings sometime just to see if they solve problems you didn’t even realize were solvable. Here are some of my favorites:

 

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Using Keyboard-only Navigation, for Web Accessibility

Blind and low-vision users, as well as those with mobility disabilities, rely on their keyboards — not a mouse — to navigate websites. Online forms are keyboard "traps" when they don't allow a user to tab through it without completing a field. That is not the case with Newegg's checkout form, which properly allows users to tab through it, and ultimately return to the browser bar, without completing a field.

… Programmers are big fans of using the keyboard instead of continually shifting between the keyboard and mouse.

And yet a significant percentage of websites make it difficult or even impossible for users to perform some activities without using a mouse or other pointer device. This curious relationship between using the keyboard and developing for the keyboard has always seemed imbalanced to me.

To be fair, navigating the Internet with a keyboard is very different from using a keyboard shortcut to perform a complex task.

The keyboard shortcuts that people use with most desktop software are combinations of two to four keys that directly activate menu actions buried somewhere in the program’s options.

Navigating a website with the keyboard primarily requires only a few keys, but they’re used constantly. The following keys are most fundamental to using a website.

  • TAB
  • SHIFT+TAB
  • SPACE
  • ENTER
  • The left, right, up, and down arrow keys.

In complex web applications, like Google Docs, more complex keyboard shortcuts are common. But for an average ecommerce site — where the priorities are getting the user to find a page, learn about a product, and then go through the purchase process — those keys are usually all you need. These are the keys that are natively defined by browsers for the operation of web pages.

Why Navigate with Just a Keyboard?

 

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10 guidelines to improve your web accessibility

We put together a list of ten web accessibility guidelines that will guarantee access to your site to any person, in spite of their disabilities.

There’s a quote by Tim Berners-Lee, Director of W3C and inventor of the World Wide Web, that says, “The power of the web is in its universality”. As people who make a living by making websites, it’s our responsibility to ensure everyone has access to them. Web accessibility seems like a tall order on paper, but it’s definitely much easier than it sounds.

Our ten web accessibility guidelines are designed to ensure that all websites are universal.

This will not only help screen reader users, but will also improve browsing experience for slow connections. We’ve sorted our guidelines by implementation time to give you a clear picture of just how much effort you’ll have to put into this process. Before you get overwhelmed, take our word for it—it’s totally worth it.

First things first:

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Read full article at Source: 10 guidelines to improve your web accessibility | Aerolab