Category Archives: tips

How Current Design Trends Impact Web Accessibility

Hands sketching a website layout on a digital tablet, meant to illustrate a UX Designer working to create a layout with web accessibility and inclusive design in mind.

“You are not your users.”
“Involve people with disabilities in user testing.”
“The average user does not exist.”
“Design for the extremes, and the middle will take care of itself.”

We hear these phrases all the time, yet a lot of people still believe that accessibility is mostly a quality assurance or developer’s responsibility, something they should only have to think about when the actual coding phase begins. But some of the really impactful decisions that make or break accessibility for people with disabilities and seniors are, in fact, made during the design phase.

Yes, you read that right. Let me rephrase it for you: a lot of the accessibility issues that people run into on our sites and applications are caused by uneducated decisions made during the design phase. You and I have the power to do something about that.

In this post, we’ll explore some of the design trends we increasingly run into on the Web today, and how decisions made during the design phases can have a hugely detrimental effect on anyone who uses the web in a slightly differently way. But first…

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How Current Design Trends Impact Web Accessibility

HTML Source Order vs CSS Display Order

Last month in my post Source Order Matters I wrote about why we need to consider how the source order of the HTML of a page can affect users when the CSS re-orders the content visually. While I used a recipe as an analogue and cited WCAG conformance rules,I failed to provide specific examples. I prepared one for my talk at Accessibility Camp Toronto, but have since expanded on it with more examples.

I want to make sure that we all understand that the source order versus display order discussion is not unique to CSS Flexbox. It is not unique to CSS Grids. Many developers have been dealing with this (correctly and incorrectly) since CSS floats and absolute positioning were introduced (and even earlier with tabled layouts). As such, I have examples of each in this post (no tabled layouts).

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: HTML Source Order vs CSS Display Order | Adrian Roselli

WebAIM: Accessible CSS

Introduction
Cascading Style Sheets, or CSS, allow you to modify characteristics of existing HTML elements. All web browsers have a built-in style sheet that defines the default styling for all elements. For instance, when the browser sees the tag, it knows to skip a line and start a new section because that’s what the built-in style sheet instructs it to do. The , and every other HTML tag is defined in this style sheet; their size, color, position, and other characteristics are all defined within it. When a page author defines their own styles, they can override this built-in style sheet and tell the browser to display elements in a different way.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: WebAIM: Accessible CSS

The Writer’s Guide to Making Accessible Web Content

Left-handed people are surrounded by items that aren’t designed for them. Scissors, golf clubs, desks, video game controllers: it’s a right-hander’s world, and it’s annoying that they don’t take your needs into account.

But imagine moving from annoyed to frustrated, because a product is completely unusable. That’s what it feels like to use the Internet if you have a disability. What acts as a small speed bump for some can feel like a mountain to those with disabilities.

“But what can I do?” you ask. “Accessibility has to be designed and coded.”

True. But it doesn’t stop there. Accessibility is about your image alt text, header design, closed captioning, and other little things that anyone can add to their blog posts, websites, and videos. It’ll make your content more accessible, for everyone—even search engines.

Here’s how you can play a role in making the web a more accessible place, and optimize your content for everyone.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The Writer’s Guide to Making Accessible Web Content

21 Chrome Extensions for Special Needs

21 Chrome Extensions for Struggling Students and Special Needs

Technology can be a powerful tool to assist students with special needs or any sort of learning challenge. In particular the Chrome web browser allows users to install a wide variety of web extensions that provide tools that can help all learners, regardless of ability level.In this blog post we will take a look at 21 Chrome web extensions that can assist students in five main categories: Text to Speech, Readability, Reading Comprehension, Focus, Navigation

Some of the tools fit into more than one topic, but each is only listed once. Certainly this list does not cover all of the useful web extensions available for struggling learners, but it is a great place to begin. In addition to the list of extension, I have also linked in the video and help guide from a webinar I did a while back on “Google Tools for Special Needs”.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Control Alt Achieve: 21 Chrome Extensions for Struggling Students and Special Needs

Easy Checks – A First Review of Web Accessibility | (WAI) | W3C

Easy Checks – A First Review of Web Accessibility

This page helps you start to assess the accessibility of a web page. With these simple steps, you can get an idea whether or not accessibility is addressed in even the most basic way.

These checks cover just a few accessibility issues and are designed to be quick and easy, rather than definitive. A web page could seem to pass these checks, yet still have significant accessibility barriers. More robust assessment is needed to evaluate accessibility comprehensively.

This page provides checks for the following specific aspects of a web page. It also provides guidance on Next Steps and links to more evaluation resources.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Easy Checks – A First Review of Web Accessibility | Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) | W3C

An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query | CSS-Tricks

The open web’s success is built on interoperable technologies. The ability to control animation now exists alongside important features such as zooming content, installing extensions, enabling high contrast display, loading custom stylesheets, or disabling JavaScript. Sites all too often inundate their audiences with automatically playing, battery-draining, resource-hogging animations. The need for people being able to take back control of animations might be more prevalent than you may initially think.

Although technology unintentionally inflicting adverse effects has existed before this, the popularity of iOS gave the issue prominence. Apple has great support for accessibility, so an option in the operating system preferences to disable motion effects for those with vestibular disorders was added in response.

#Vestibu-what?

Your vestibular system provides an internal sensor to communicate your body’s physical position and orientation in the world, and is key to controlling balance and eye movement.

Vestibular disorders can cause your vestibular system to struggle to make sense of what is happening, resulting in loss of balance and vertigo, migraines, nausea, and hearing loss. Anyone who has spun around too quickly is familiar with a confused vestibular system.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query | CSS-Tricks

Simple tips for easy Word doc accessibility – Media Access Australia

Two men using a phone and a laptop
Two men interacting with documents on a mobile and a laptop

Creating Word documents that can be read and understood by a diverse range of people, is just as vital as creating accessible, inclusive websites and online content. Imagine going to a recruitment website and downloading the Position Description as a Word document, or being sent it as an email attachment, only to find that you cannot access the document using your screen reader (if you are blind or vision-impaired) can’t listen to the linked podcast (if you are Deaf or hearing impaired), or simply can’t understand large sections of it because the document is full of industry jargon that is not explained.

Let’s start with what ‘accessibility’ actually means, when it comes to a Word document. It’s about removing barriers that prevent interaction with, and the understanding of, the contents of a document, so that people of all abilities are not excluded.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Simple tips for easy Word doc accessibility – Media Access Australia