Category Archives: tips

Introducing A11y Toggle

If you’re only here for the code, go straight to the GitHub repository.

A few weeks ago, I introduced a11y-dialog. Today, I am coming back with another accessibility-focused module: a11y-toggle.

At Edenspiekermann, we used to heavily rely on the checkbox hack to toggle content visibility. Unfortunately, this hack (the word is an understatement) involves some usability and accessibility concerns.

What’s wrong with the checkbox hack?

That’s a lot of people excluded just for the sake of simplicity (which is also arguable). On top of that, the checkbox hack has some accessibility issues. See, for a content toggle to be fully accessible to assistive technology users, it should respect the following:

So we need JavaScript (unfortunately). However, we don’t need a hell lot of it. A few lines are enough. And that’s precisely what a11y-toggle does (in roughly 300 bytes once gzipped). It just makes it work™.

 

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How disabled iPhone users can take control with blinks, nudges and even breath

tecla shield disabled touchscreen teclashield editTim Cook began Apple’s latest product unveiling with a video narrated by a disabled woman using a Mac with the help of an assistive device — a switch that she could bump with the side of her head. Her name is Sady Paulson, and the message couldn’t have been clearer: With the right technology, even people with almost no control over their bodies can interact with the world and harness their own creativity in ways that were previously impossible.

Wireless freedom for disabled people

The video was upbeat and inspirational, meant to affirm Apple’s commitment to accessibility. But what it didn’t show was the struggle those like Paulson have when it comes to controlling a multitude of devices. That head-triggered switch might be her only means of controlling her wheelchair, computer, or phone or tablet. If it’s hardwired into one of these devices, how can it control the others?

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The Accessibility Difference Between Aria-hidden and role=”presentation”

In dealing with role=”presentation” and aria-hidden=”true” you may find that they both have deceptively similar functions when it relates to how they interact with assistive technology (screen readers). Before we dig into the difference between these two attributes we first need to learn a little bit about how accessibility in a Web browser works and this thing called: The Accessibility Tree

The Accessibility Tree

The accessibility tree is a mapping of objects within an HTML document that need to be exposed to assistive technology (if you’re familiar with the DOM, it’s a subset of the DOM). Anything that communicates aspects of the UI or has a property or relationship that needs to be exposed, gets added to the tree.

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17 Adjustments You Can Make to Your Website  for Better Accessibility

Web developer Mary Gillen shares 17 adjustments you can make to your website today that make it more accessible to visitors with disabilities. WCAG 2.0

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Read full article at Source: 17 Adjustments You Can Make to Your Website Today That Make It More17 Website Adjustments You Can Make Today for Better Accessibility Accessible to Visitors with Disabilities |

3 steps to fulfill 80% standards with 20% effort


3 steps to fulfill 80% standards with 20% effort

Make your website usable with keyboard only: make sure that focus outline is visible all the time and user can determine which element is currently focusedno extra/unnecessary TAB stopsno tabstop traps (when you cannot get out of an element with the keyboard)

Implement smart focus management:
set focus on appropriate elements after user actions (e.g., when a user navigates to a page with a login form – set the focus on the login text field; in 90% of the cases the next user action will be entering the login)restore focus to appropriate elements after user actions (e.g., when a user closes a menu, focus should be restored to the element that was focused on before opening the menu)make tab order user-friendly (remove non-actionable and non-informative tab stops)

Make your website usable with screen reader:

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Read full article at Source: Web Accessibility Hacker Way

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility | Accessibility | Posters

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility

Karwai Pun, 2 September 2016 — Design, User research

Karwai Pun is an interaction designer currently working on Service Optimisation to make existing and new services better for our users. Karwai is part of an accessibility group at Home Office Digital, leading on autism, and has created these dos and don’ts posters as a way of approaching accessibility from a design perspective.

Dos and don’ts

The dos and don’ts of designing for accessibility are general guidelines, best design practices for making our services accessible. Currently, we have six different posters in our series that cater to users from these areas: low vision, deaf and hard of hearing, dyslexia, those with motor disabilities, users on the autistic spectrum and users of screen readers.

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Read full article at Source: Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility | Accessibility