Category Archives: tool

JAWS screen reader gets more bight

Image of JAWS screen reader logo

Freedom Scientific has recently released JAWS 18.0.2738, which incorporates several important improvements made between the JAWS February 2017 release and this mid April 2017 update, plus dozens of less revolutionary but very practical enhancements.

JAWS (Job Access With Speech) is the world’s most popular screen reader, developed for computer users whose vision loss prevents them from seeing screen content or navigating with a mouse. It allows blind and vision-impaired people to read the screen either with a text-to-speech output or by a refreshable Braille display.

The latest update resolved some minor issues within the software itself, as well as providing a long list of user enhancements and expanded features when using JAWS with Microsoft Office, Google Docs, on a variety of Web Browsers, and in Windows 10.

Source: JAWS screen reader gets more bight | Media Access Australia

wA11y – The Web Accessibility Toolbox WordPress Plugin

Boost your WordPress accessibility! The Web Accessibility Toolbox contains tools to spot deficits in accessibility and suggestions on how to better it.

Recently released, the wA11y plugin consists of tools to check and correct your WordPress site’s accessibility. (The name is derived from a11y, the shorthand way of writing accessibility, with “w” representing Web.)

 

The plugin was developed by Rachel Carden, a software engineer at Disney Interactive and accessibility advocate.

I decided to give wA11y a spin to see what it could do.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: wA11y – The Web Accessibility Toolbox WordPress Plugin

Prototyping accessibility in web and mobile UI design

Adaptable, interactive and coherent prototypes for users with disabilities. Covering accessibility in the prototyping phase of web and app design.

Pay close attention to color, contrast and visual hierarchy

Make your interactive UI elements more interactive

Don’t crowd me!

Make your app accessible by being adaptable

“Flexibility is the key to ensuring that your website is accessible to everyone.” Shaun Anderson, Hobo Web

Prototyping responsive design is actually pretty easy. With Justinmind prototyping tool, it really only involves creating a set of screens of different sizes (to represent the different screens sizes that your users use), adding the content to each screen, and adding linking events between the screens. In fact, we’ve created a nifty tutorial in our Support section to teach you step by step.

Don’t forget the user testing

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Prototyping accessibility in web and mobile UI design

Google’s DeepMind AI can lip-read TV shows better than a pro | New Scientist

An artificial intelligence system developed by researchers at DeepMind and the University of Oxford got so good by watching 5000 hours of BBC programmes

Artificial intelligence is getting its teeth into lip reading. A project by Google’s DeepMind and the University of Oxford applied deep learning to a huge data set of BBC programmes to create a lip-reading system that leaves professionals in the dust.

Source: Google’s DeepMind AI can lip-read TV shows better than a pro | New Scientist

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility | Accessibility | Posters

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility

Karwai Pun, 2 September 2016 — Design, User research

Karwai Pun is an interaction designer currently working on Service Optimisation to make existing and new services better for our users. Karwai is part of an accessibility group at Home Office Digital, leading on autism, and has created these dos and don’ts posters as a way of approaching accessibility from a design perspective.

Dos and don’ts

The dos and don’ts of designing for accessibility are general guidelines, best design practices for making our services accessible. Currently, we have six different posters in our series that cater to users from these areas: low vision, deaf and hard of hearing, dyslexia, those with motor disabilities, users on the autistic spectrum and users of screen readers.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility | Accessibility