Category Archives: tool

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility | Accessibility | Posters

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility

Karwai Pun, 2 September 2016 — Design, User research

Karwai Pun is an interaction designer currently working on Service Optimisation to make existing and new services better for our users. Karwai is part of an accessibility group at Home Office Digital, leading on autism, and has created these dos and don’ts posters as a way of approaching accessibility from a design perspective.

Dos and don’ts

The dos and don’ts of designing for accessibility are general guidelines, best design practices for making our services accessible. Currently, we have six different posters in our series that cater to users from these areas: low vision, deaf and hard of hearing, dyslexia, those with motor disabilities, users on the autistic spectrum and users of screen readers.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility | Accessibility

PAVE 2.0: A New Generation of the Web Tool for PDF Accessibility 

The ICT-Accessibility Lab of the ZHAW, in collaboration with the Swiss Blind and Visually Impaired Association (SBV), has developed a web tool called PAVE which quickly and easily makes existing PDF documents accessible.

This is critical for allowing existing screen-reading programs to read the correct content. With PAVE 2.0, the existing web tool has been fundamentally revised and extended with a new paragraph detection feature.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: PAVE 2.0: A New Generation of the Web Tool for PDF Accessibility Global Alliance on Accessible Technologies and Environments

Evaluating Cognitive Web Accessibility with WAVE

WAVE Web Accessibility Tool

Introduction

WAVE is a web accessibility tool that can greatly assist in the evaluation of web content. Rather than providing a complex technical report, WAVE shows the original web page with embedded icons and indicators that reveal the accessibility of that page. …

WAVE, like any other automated tool, cannot tell you if your page is accessible, but it can help in human evaluation of web accessibility. …

The following checklist outlines things you can do to evaluate and improve cognitive web accessibility. This checklist is broken into general areas of cognitive accessibility. Many of the items listed are things that you must check for yourself on the page.

Cognitive Web Accessibility Checklist

Consistency

Transformability

Multi-modality

Focus and Structure

Readability and Language

Orientation and Error Prevention/Recovery

Assistive Technology Compatibility

Users with cognitive or learning disabilities often use screen readers or other assistive technologies to access content through various senses or to modify content to be best perceivable to them. Users with other physical or sensory disabilities also have a higher prevalence of cognitive or learning disabilities. The vast majority of WAVE icons indicate assistive technology errors, alerts, or features. Below are particular items to be aware of when evaluating assistive technology support for users with cognitive disabilities.

 

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Evaluating Cognitive Web Accessibility with WAVE

Demystifying cognitive disability – Media Access Australia

 

Cognitive disability can be a difficult condition to understand. This is particularly the case for organisations wanting to be able to find out how to better address the communication needs of their managers, staff and consumers with a cognitive disability, in a media context.

 

That’s why Media Access Australia has created a practical resource for organisational support: the Cognitive Disability Digital Accessibility Guide, which is free to download from the Media Access Australia website.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Demystifying cognitive disability – Media Access Australia

Accessibility Checker Goes Open Source

It’s Global Accessibility Awareness Day today! To celebrate it in a big way, we would like to announce that as of today, Accessibility Checker for CKEditor will be available also under an Open Source GPL license. If you care about accessibility, want to learn more about how important it is, and get to know our new product, read on!

The StoryAccessibility support has always been a priority issue at CKSource. CKEditor complies with most important industry standards, recommendations and checklists plus it includes a number of features that make it easy to use with assistive technologies.Last year we decided to give our dedication to web accessibility a big boost and entered the market with Accessibility Checker – an innovative tool that enables you to check your content for accessibility issues and fix them before you go live.​

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility Checker Goes Open Source | CKSource.com

Simple Ways to Make Your WordPress Site Accessible

Web site accessibility has been a lingering issue on the Internet for quite some time. However, with several laws in the US pushing website accessibility as a primary feature in public and private web entities, it has affected the Internet on a wider scale.

Accessibility has been proven to be beneficial to websites, public or businesses alike. Certain sites were slapped with legal complications, like this court case of a visually impaired handicap versus a luggage company. This also creates a positive PR for your website; social responsibility is a desirable trait that often gets a nod from the online community.

On the other hand, it positively affects your website’s search engine rankings as well. Website accessibility is good for SEO, as making your website accessible requires you to input text that can be read by screen readers and web crawlers alike.

It improves usability for the handicapped and non-handicapped. It also broadens your market reach. In the UK alone, since 2015, the number of disabled adults who had used the internet in the last 3 months has increased by 6.8% to 8.6 million in 2016. Imagine reaching out to 8.6 million more visitors and prospective buyers!

The disabled may be a minor group, but there’s strength in their numbers. The following simple tweaks will help your website gain more followers as you make your site accessible to all:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Simple Ways to Make Your WordPress Site Accessible

Newest Browsers Vivaldi and Brave Missing Key Feature

Two former big bosses of popular browsers are at it again, taking the helm of new browsers.

Brendan Eich, literal father of JavaScript, and former co-founder of Mozilla, has recently released Brave, a new browser aimed at increasing privacy and security for its users.

Similarly Jon von Tetzchner, former co-founder of the Opera Browser, just released his new browser Vivaldi, which is supposed to be made for power users, or users that expect a lot of customization. It is described as having so many features that extensions/ plugins are not required.

… Unfortunately, these browser are also not accessible to screen reader users. At least in my personal quick tests. If I am wrong, please correct me.

I tried both browsers with VoiceOver on MAC and with NVDA on Win 7. Other than announcing the window, not much else was possible in either.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Newest Browsers Vivaldi and Brave Missing Key Feature – Unfettered Thoughts

Evaluating Cognitive Web Accessibility with WAVE

WAVE is a web accessibility tool that can greatly assist in the evaluation of web content. Rather than providing a complex technical report, WAVE shows the original web page with embedded icons and indicators that reveal the accessibility of that page. Before proceeding, be sure to read the Help page for an overview of using WAVE and details on specific things you may encounter.

The following checklist outlines things you can do to evaluate and improve cognitive web accessibility. This checklist is broken into general areas of cognitive accessibility. Many of the items listed are things that you must check for yourself on the page. Some checkpoints may be difficult to measure or may not have a clear answer (for example, how do you tell if language is “simple”?). This checklist, however, should help you determine the general level of cognitive accessibility and can help you identify areas where improvements can be made. WAVE can facilitate evaluation of many of the checkpoints. WAVE icons that appear adjacent to a checkpoint indicate specific WAVE rules that can be of assistance to you. You can click on the icons to view details about that icon, why it might appear in your content, and what you can do to improve accessibility. If you see these icons in a WAVE report, pay particular attention to them because they likely indicate an aspect of the page that can affect cognitive accessibility.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Evaluating Cognitive Web Accessibility with WAVE

Contrast Ratio: Easily calculate color contrast ratios. Passing WCAG was never this easy!

The simplest, easiest tool for quickly finding good contrast:

 

Capture

As you type, the contrast ratio indicated will update. Hover over the circle to get more detailed information. When semi-transparent colors are involved as backgrounds, the contrast ratio will have an error margin, to account for the different colors they may be over.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Contrast Ratio: Easily calculate color contrast ratios. Passing WCAG was never this easy!