Category Archives: web

Accessibility Testing: Checkers & Development Tools Review

Tools of the Trade

In a different article, I outline the basics foundations of accessibility standards: “Understanding s508 & WCAG 2.0“. To further expand this, let’s look at various development tools to help author accessible content conformant to the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (“WCAG”) 2.0 standards.

Getting Started

For a primer or refresher on what the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) is review the W3 Org website and its associated entries on this subject at https://www.w3.org/WAI/.

Checkers and Tools

W3 Org offers a great list of available tools for developers to use when checking content for accessibility conformance at https://www.w3.org/WAI/ER/tools/. Various filters can be applied to this list, in order to narrow-down best options. For this article, I applied the following filters:

  • Guidelines > WCAG 2.0 – W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0
  • Languages > English
  • License > Free and License > Open Source

From the filtered-list, I chose to explore the following tools/checkers:

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Read full article at Source.

 

Microsoft Hosts Its First Accessibility Summit to Better Tech Access For Disabled

Microsoft India today hosted its first-ever Accessibility Summit in the country to enhance technology access for people with disabilities. The summit aimed at demonstrating the business value of accessible technology for organizations, the need for a collaborative effort as well as assessing policy’s role in creating an accessible India.Through a series of constructive sessions, the conference focused on the role of technology in creating accessible businesses, scalable and sustainable models for skilling youth with disability. It also examined how assistive technologies can help in treating Autism Spectrum Disorders and Special Learning Disabilities (SLD).

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Read full article at Source: Microsoft Hosts Its First Accessibility Summit to Better Tech Access For Disabled

Slides: London Web Standards; Making SVG accessible

London Web Standards is an established and popular meetup for web professionals. The meetups cover a broad range of topics including design, development, UX and accessibility, and this month I had the opportunity to talk about SVG accessibility. The talk looked at SVG past, present, and future, and explored the benefits and challenges it brings in terms of accessibility. Topics included the best way to maximise SVG accessibility, how to use ARIA to supplement the native accessibility of SVG, and how to us

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Read full article at Source: Slides: London Web Standards; Making SVG accessible | The Paciello Group – Your Accessibility Partner (WCAG 2.0/508 audits, VPAT, usability and accessible user experience)

Accessibility for Visual Design

They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder. As designers, we need to remember that the same is true of color and all visual abilities. It’s estimated that 4.5% of the global population experience color blindness (that’s 1 in 12 men and 1 in 200 women), 4% suffer from low vision (1 in 30 people), and 0.6% are blind (1 in 188 people). It’s easy to forget that we’re designing for this group of users since most designers don’t experience such problems.

Today’s products must be made accessible for everyone–regardless of a person’s abilities. Designing for users with visual or other impairments is an example of how designers can practice empathy and learn to experience the world from someone else’s perspective.

Creating accessible design seems like a difficult task. Fortunately, as a designer you don’t need to become an expert on visual impairment issues; you can make sure that your design is good for this group of users by keeping in mind a few solid best practices, which we’ll review in this article.

One caveat: not every best practice will apply to all users with visual impairments, but at least some of it will apply to a very large majority of them.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility for Visual Design | UX Booth

Google Maps now lets users add wheelchair accessibility details for locations 

Back in December, Google finally added accessibility details to Maps. It was a long awaited addition, but an extremely welcome one for the more than three million people in the U.S. who require wheelchair accessibility. As we noted at the time, however, the available information still left a lot to be desired. Maps has currently collected accessibility data for almost seven million places, but even with databases like Wheelmap, there were still some pretty big gaps across the country.This week, Google’s l

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Read full article at Source: Google Maps now lets users add wheelchair accessibility details for locations | TechCrunch

The web is awesome and everyone should be able to read it.

These last months I’ve been improving my website accessibility so anyone can understand it. Here’s what I’ve learned:
By anyone I mean any person that doesn’t use the internet like I do. Having empathy with the users is one of the things I’ve been learning on web development. You should give it a try as well. Not everyone interacts with an interface or uses the same device and input devices as you do.
Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within the other person’s frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in another’s position. — wikipedia
So you should adapt your product for them. By adapting I don’t mean making it uglier. I mean making it simple. And doing something simple is hard. It’s good to force yourself to rethink your interface or logic in order to accomplish a more complete and intuitive solution.

That old lady being awesome on the web
The problem
I love to explore new interactive ways to communicate a message, so last Summer I rethought my personal website. I don’t consider it a straightforward portfolio, as interaction is the way to explore it. That’s the best part about it and at the same time the worst part.
Some months ago I got to know that users who use only keyboard or screen readers can’t understand shit. They have so many visual and interactive elements to explore that they end up lost. As a web lover, excluding people from using it to its fullest potential, just makes me really sad.

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Read full article at Source: The web is awesome and everyone should be able to read it.

The a11y Monthly: get rid of your tables (or fix them) 

While the original intended use of HTML tables was tabular data, tables are also used as aids for page layout. This was especially true some years ago when browsers hardly supported CSS. Tables were necessary to overcome limitations in visual presentation. Today, there is much more flexibility in controlling page layout using CSS. Does it still make sense to use layout tables? From an accessibility perspective, are layout tables good or bad? Any myths and misconceptions to debunk? At Yoast, we’ve decided to get rid of the few layout tables still used in our plugins.

We’re working hard on making the web and our products as accessible as possible for everyone. We believe every single individual on this planet has a right to accessible web content and we have to lead by example. Since so much of our work goes on behind the scenes, we’re publishing this monthly series of blog posts to keep you posted on this important part of our work.

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Read full article at Source: The a11y Monthly: get rid of your tables (or fix them) • Yoast Dev Blog

The 7 Factors that Influence User Experience 

User Experience (UX) is critical to the success or failure of a product in the market but what do we mean by UX? All too often UX is confused with usability which describes to some extent how easy a product is to use and it is true that UX as a discipline began with usability – however, UX has grown to accommodate rather more than usability and it is important to pay attention to all facets of the user experience in order to deliver successful products to market.

There are 7 factors that describe user experience, according to Peter Morville a pioneer in the UX field who was written several best-selling books and advises many Fortune 500 companies on UX:

  • Useful
  • Usable
  • Findable
  • Credible
  • Desirable
  • Accessible
  • Valuable

Let’s take a look at each factor in turn and what it means for the overall user experience:

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Read full article at Source: The 7 Factors that Influence User Experience | Interaction Design Foundation

We need to talk about Accessibility on Chatbots

What happens when a blind person wants to use your chatbot?

This idea started after I did a research on UX for autonomous cars or self-driving cars. I did some interviews with 4 people, one of them being blind. I was really surprised to know that she can fully take care of herself and go around using her phone and guide dog. She uses her phone and her dog as interfaces to do something that (unfortunately) she is not able to.

After the interviews, I started my UX research and then, another surprise: the aspects of UX for self-driving cars — which I noticed basically two:

  • Visual design — “how can we let people know what the car sees?” Tons of (interesting) concepts of visual design to let people understand and see what the car sees while it’s driving itself.
  • Affordances — “How can we make people interact with the car?” I have seen nice buttons, panels and clues that help people interact with the cars.

With those two main aspects in mind, I started questioning myself:

What about blind people? How will they use self-driving cars?

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Read full article at Source: We need to talk about Accessibility on Chatbots

Developers: get started with web accessibility

If web accessibility is new to you, the path ahead can seem overwhelming.

If web accessibility is new to you, the path ahead can seem overwhelming.

It’s not so bad. I promise!

You could chase perfection forever by building accessible products for every user imaginable. That’s no different from design and development more generally: there’s always room for improvement.

But when it comes to usability — and that includes accessibility — a product doesn’t need to be perfect to be practical. Even small changes can make a big difference.

So here are some tips for how to get started. This guide is written for front-end web developers who are new to accessibility, and it’s by no means comprehensive — but I hope it will help you start a longer journey of learning.

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Read full article at Source: Developers: get started with web accessibility – Medium