Category Archives: web

How to Describe Complex Designs for Users with Disabilities – Salesforce UX

You’re a developer who has just been handed a complex design spec. You know the designs support accessibility because your UX team read a…

in Section 508 contains one very sage suggestion. It states that,

“… sufficient information about a user interface element including the identity, operation and state of the element shall be available to assistive technology.”

Originally written for software, these words are even more relevant today given the prevalence of web based applications. They describe the type of information users with disabilities need in order to successfully complete a task. This could be a blind user with a screen reader, a voice input user with a physical disability, or any number of other types of users with a variety of assistive technologies.

The basic fundamentals of making any interaction accessible with both the keyboard and for screen reader users comes down to providing three basic pieces of information: identity, operation, and state.

Users interacting with an element as basic as a checkbox, or as complex as drag and drop experience, have to consider these three questions:

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Read full article at Source: How to Describe Complex Designs for Users with Disabilities – Salesforce UX – Medium

Some tough love: Stop the excuses, already.

Over a year ago, Dale Cruse called me “militant” about accessibility. I know I use strong language at times, but I actively try to have a softer touch. I think he meant it kindly anyway…

The core Web technologies necessary to make web content accessible are not new. The needs of users with disabilities aren’t new. If any of these topics are new to you, that’s fine. Fucking learn them.

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Read full article at Source: Some tough love: Stop the excuses, already.

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility | Accessibility | Posters

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility

Karwai Pun, 2 September 2016 — Design, User research

Karwai Pun is an interaction designer currently working on Service Optimisation to make existing and new services better for our users. Karwai is part of an accessibility group at Home Office Digital, leading on autism, and has created these dos and don’ts posters as a way of approaching accessibility from a design perspective.

Dos and don’ts

The dos and don’ts of designing for accessibility are general guidelines, best design practices for making our services accessible. Currently, we have six different posters in our series that cater to users from these areas: low vision, deaf and hard of hearing, dyslexia, those with motor disabilities, users on the autistic spectrum and users of screen readers.

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Read full article at Source: Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility | Accessibility

Provide accessible images | Online Accessibility | harvard.edu

Provide accessible images

Images can be effective way to convey meaning, such as to provide additional information to text content or to assign labels to buttons. Text alternatives are vital for people who can’t see them. When icons are added as images, the best practice is the same as for providing alternative text for images. When other methods are used, such as background images or icon fonts, additional care is needed to ensure that their meanings are available to screen reader users, people with reading difficulties, and those who use Windows High Contrast Mode or who need to apply a user-defined style sheet that changes fonts.

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Read full article at Source: Provide accessible images | Online Accessibility

Making Information Accessible – Dyslexia Friendly Style Guide

For people with dyslexia, the ability to read and understand text can be affected by the way in which text has been written and produced.

If you are producing information to be read by others, it is important to remember that up to 10% of your readers may have dyslexia.

Dyslexia friendly text will have improved readability and better visual impact for all readers, but especially those with dyslexia.

The following are some simple recommendations to help ensure that your text is dyslexia friendly:

 
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Does Your Company Website Violate the ADA? Part 1

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is most commonly thought of as prohibiting workplace discrimination against individuals with disabilities and requiring the elimination of physical barriers to public locations.  But a recent wave of litigation presents a less obvious application of the ADA that may have a far broader impact: the potential application of the ADA to websites.  Before discussing the recent litigation, we briefly address two threshold questions (1) does the ADA apply to websites at all

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Read full article at Source: Does Your Company Website Violate the ADA? | Publications | Carlton Fields

The ultimate guide to web content accessibility

Websites with standards-compliant code all follow the typical W3C standards. But there’s a whole different level of compliance when it comes to WCAG, also known as the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines.

The same people who produce the HTML5/CSS3 specs organize and officiate these guidelines, so it’s truly an international system of coding standards. Most web developers never bother with WCAG accessibility, but it’s becoming a huge aspect of the internet.

If you’re looking to understand accessibility or just want to delve a bit deeper into the subject, then this guide is for you. I’ll explain some basics of WCAG conformance for a beginner, along with all the tools and resources you’ll need to keep learning along the way.

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Read full article at Source: The ultimate guide to web content accessibility – InVision Blog

How to do Web Accessibility QA: Part 2 | Viget

 

Accessibility QA starts with broadening your frame of reference and understanding what it’s like to use a computer in unfamiliar ways. With that understanding, we can dive into actual testing.

The usual starting point is to read the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (aka WCAG), which define the current accessibility standard. (The older Section 508 standard is relevant only for government sites.) But good luck understanding WCAG on first glance.

WCAG is broken into three levels (A, AA, AAA); four principles; 12 guidelines; and 61 success criteria. It’s hard to make sense of WCAG’s multi-layered categorization, jargon, and sheer number of items.

The good news: You don’t have to worry about all that to get started. Instead, I find it easier to think in terms of these broad goals:

  • Goal 1: People who don’t use a mouse should be able to use and understand a site.
  • Goal 2: People who don’t look at a screen should be able to use and understand a site.
  • Goal 3: A site’s content should be visually legible.
  • Goal 4: People should have access to alternate versions of video and audio content.
  • Goal 5: People should have control over automatic changes to the page.

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How to do Web Accessibility QA: Part 2 | Viget

How to do Web Accessibility QA: Part 1 | Viget

If you’re nervous about doing accessibility QA for the first time, I’m with you. Thanks to Jeremy Fields and others, I had multiple background sessions — but I still felt lost when it came time for real testing.

Don’t sweat it; a11y testing is straightforward once you understand a few foundational concepts. Here’s my two-part guide to accessibility testing so you can help make your sites as inclusive as possible. (Here’s Part 2.)

Start by experiencing how people use a computer differently than you: with a keyboard (no mouse) and screen reader.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How to do Web Accessibility QA: Part 1 | Viget

WCAG is not scary anymore – A progressive approach to Website Accessibility | Herin Hentry

WCAG is not scary anymore was the title of my presentation at A11yCamp, Melbourne 2016 representing Planit Software Testing, Accessibility Services which received good feedback from the audience. I thought I will follow that up with an article on LinkedIn to share with a larger audience.

Source: WCAG is not scary anymore – A progressive approach to Website Accessibility | Herin Hentry | Pulse | LinkedIn