Category Archives: web

What the Heck Is Inclusive Design? ◆ 24 ways

Recently, I’ve been using the term “inclusive design” and calling myself an “inclusive designer” a lot.

I’m not sure where I first heard it or who came up with it, but the terminology feels like a good fit for the kind of stuff I care to do when I’m not at a pub or asleep.

This article is about what I think “inclusive design” means and why I think you might like it as an idea.Isn’t ‘inclusive design’ just ‘accessibility’ by another name?

No, I don’t think so. But that’s not to say the two concepts aren’t…

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Introducing A11y Toggle

If you’re only here for the code, go straight to the GitHub repository.

A few weeks ago, I introduced a11y-dialog. Today, I am coming back with another accessibility-focused module: a11y-toggle.

At Edenspiekermann, we used to heavily rely on the checkbox hack to toggle content visibility. Unfortunately, this hack (the word is an understatement) involves some usability and accessibility concerns.

What’s wrong with the checkbox hack?

That’s a lot of people excluded just for the sake of simplicity (which is also arguable). On top of that, the checkbox hack has some accessibility issues. See, for a content toggle to be fully accessible to assistive technology users, it should respect the following:

So we need JavaScript (unfortunately). However, we don’t need a hell lot of it. A few lines are enough. And that’s precisely what a11y-toggle does (in roughly 300 bytes once gzipped). It just makes it work™.

 

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The Accessibility Difference Between Aria-hidden and role=”presentation”

In dealing with role=”presentation” and aria-hidden=”true” you may find that they both have deceptively similar functions when it relates to how they interact with assistive technology (screen readers). Before we dig into the difference between these two attributes we first need to learn a little bit about how accessibility in a Web browser works and this thing called: The Accessibility Tree

The Accessibility Tree

The accessibility tree is a mapping of objects within an HTML document that need to be exposed to assistive technology (if you’re familiar with the DOM, it’s a subset of the DOM). Anything that communicates aspects of the UI or has a property or relationship that needs to be exposed, gets added to the tree.

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17 Adjustments You Can Make to Your Website  for Better Accessibility

Web developer Mary Gillen shares 17 adjustments you can make to your website today that make it more accessible to visitors with disabilities. WCAG 2.0

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How to Describe Complex Designs for Users with Disabilities – Salesforce UX

You’re a developer who has just been handed a complex design spec. You know the designs support accessibility because your UX team read a…

in Section 508 contains one very sage suggestion. It states that,

“… sufficient information about a user interface element including the identity, operation and state of the element shall be available to assistive technology.”

Originally written for software, these words are even more relevant today given the prevalence of web based applications. They describe the type of information users with disabilities need in order to successfully complete a task. This could be a blind user with a screen reader, a voice input user with a physical disability, or any number of other types of users with a variety of assistive technologies.

The basic fundamentals of making any interaction accessible with both the keyboard and for screen reader users comes down to providing three basic pieces of information: identity, operation, and state.

Users interacting with an element as basic as a checkbox, or as complex as drag and drop experience, have to consider these three questions:

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Some tough love: Stop the excuses, already.

Over a year ago, Dale Cruse called me “militant” about accessibility. I know I use strong language at times, but I actively try to have a softer touch. I think he meant it kindly anyway…

The core Web technologies necessary to make web content accessible are not new. The needs of users with disabilities aren’t new. If any of these topics are new to you, that’s fine. Fucking learn them.

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Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility | Accessibility | Posters

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility

Karwai Pun, 2 September 2016 — Design, User research

Karwai Pun is an interaction designer currently working on Service Optimisation to make existing and new services better for our users. Karwai is part of an accessibility group at Home Office Digital, leading on autism, and has created these dos and don’ts posters as a way of approaching accessibility from a design perspective.

Dos and don’ts

The dos and don’ts of designing for accessibility are general guidelines, best design practices for making our services accessible. Currently, we have six different posters in our series that cater to users from these areas: low vision, deaf and hard of hearing, dyslexia, those with motor disabilities, users on the autistic spectrum and users of screen readers.

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Provide accessible images | Online Accessibility | harvard.edu

Provide accessible images

Images can be effective way to convey meaning, such as to provide additional information to text content or to assign labels to buttons. Text alternatives are vital for people who can’t see them. When icons are added as images, the best practice is the same as for providing alternative text for images. When other methods are used, such as background images or icon fonts, additional care is needed to ensure that their meanings are available to screen reader users, people with reading difficulties, and those who use Windows High Contrast Mode or who need to apply a user-defined style sheet that changes fonts.

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Making Information Accessible – Dyslexia Friendly Style Guide

For people with dyslexia, the ability to read and understand text can be affected by the way in which text has been written and produced.

If you are producing information to be read by others, it is important to remember that up to 10% of your readers may have dyslexia.

Dyslexia friendly text will have improved readability and better visual impact for all readers, but especially those with dyslexia.

The following are some simple recommendations to help ensure that your text is dyslexia friendly:

 
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Does Your Company Website Violate the ADA? Part 1

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is most commonly thought of as prohibiting workplace discrimination against individuals with disabilities and requiring the elimination of physical barriers to public locations.  But a recent wave of litigation presents a less obvious application of the ADA that may have a far broader impact: the potential application of the ADA to websites.  Before discussing the recent litigation, we briefly address two threshold questions (1) does the ADA apply to websites at all

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Read full article at Source: Does Your Company Website Violate the ADA? | Publications | Carlton Fields