Tag Archives: accessibility

3D-printed Nintendo Switch peripheral is huge for gaming accessibility

An engineer is helping to make playing Nintendo Switch a lot more accessible for gamers everywhere.

Engineer Julio Vazquez created two 3D-printed peripherals for the Nintendo Switch’s Joy-Con controllers, allowing players who only have the use of one hand to play Switch games more easily.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vazquez created the design on the right in April, which puts the two Joy-Cons right next to each other, effectively closing the gap that the standard Joy-Con grip creates and making it easier for players to reach every button.

But some games with more complex control schemes, like The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, require more simultaneous button and joystick interaction though, so Vazquez also created the design on the left.

Vazquez says he was inspired to create the single-hand Joy-Con adapters by his friend who lost his ability to use his right hand.

Source

The Accessibility Cheatsheet

We all know that accessibility is important. The problem is, it is not always clear what exactly we can do to make our sites more accessible.

The Web Accessibility Initiative created some Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) targeted at us, web content developers, to create more accessible websites. The WCAG contain some very useful information, and so I decided to condense the very extensive guidelines and highlight some practical examples of what we can do to implement them and make our websites more accessible.

Overview

The guidelines for accessible content have four overarching principles, each with more specific guidelines. You can click on the link to go to the relevant section of this article.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The Accessibility Cheatsheet

Accessibility for Software and Devices | Microsoft

Our commitment to accessibility Microsoft’s mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more. With over 1 billion people with disabilities in the world, we’re passionate about ensuring that our products and services are designed for people of all abilities. We are committed to transparency, accountability, and inclusion in our products and our culture, and we are deeply inspired by the opportunity to work with others around the world to explore what’s possible. There a …

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Read full article at Source: Accessibility for Software and Devices | Microsoft

Accessibility features in macOS and iOS that everyone should try

iphone mac pixabay

If you’re someone who doesn’t have any specific reasons to go there, you may have never explored the Accessibility settings on your Mac, iPhone, or iPad. While it’s true that those settings are there primarily for people who have special physical needs to modify how a device’s interface works, the fact is, many people who don’t consider themselves in need of any sort of accommodation can find something of value in these settings.

Accessibility has become a place where Apple buries some specific, nitpicky details about how its devices behave–and that’s why you should take a stroll through those settings sometime just to see if they solve problems you didn’t even realize were solvable. Here are some of my favorites:

 

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Read full article at source.

Using Keyboard-only Navigation, for Web Accessibility

Blind and low-vision users, as well as those with mobility disabilities, rely on their keyboards — not a mouse — to navigate websites. Online forms are keyboard "traps" when they don't allow a user to tab through it without completing a field. That is not the case with Newegg's checkout form, which properly allows users to tab through it, and ultimately return to the browser bar, without completing a field.

… Programmers are big fans of using the keyboard instead of continually shifting between the keyboard and mouse.

And yet a significant percentage of websites make it difficult or even impossible for users to perform some activities without using a mouse or other pointer device. This curious relationship between using the keyboard and developing for the keyboard has always seemed imbalanced to me.

To be fair, navigating the Internet with a keyboard is very different from using a keyboard shortcut to perform a complex task.

The keyboard shortcuts that people use with most desktop software are combinations of two to four keys that directly activate menu actions buried somewhere in the program’s options.

Navigating a website with the keyboard primarily requires only a few keys, but they’re used constantly. The following keys are most fundamental to using a website.

  • TAB
  • SHIFT+TAB
  • SPACE
  • ENTER
  • The left, right, up, and down arrow keys.

In complex web applications, like Google Docs, more complex keyboard shortcuts are common. But for an average ecommerce site — where the priorities are getting the user to find a page, learn about a product, and then go through the purchase process — those keys are usually all you need. These are the keys that are natively defined by browsers for the operation of web pages.

Why Navigate with Just a Keyboard?

 

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Read full article at Source

Sounding out the web: accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing people [Part 1] 

The largely visual nature of the web means that we tend to focus on supporting people who are blind or partially sighted. But deaf and hard of hearing people are often overlooked. I spoke with Ruth MacMullen, who is an academic librarian and copyright specialist from York in the UK, about her experience of being deaf and how it affects her use of the web.

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Read full article at Source: Sounding out the web: accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing people [Part 1] | The Paciello Group – Your Accessibility Partner (WCAG 2.0/508 audits, VPAT, usability and accessible user experience)

Reframing Accessibility for the Web · An A List Apart

We need to change the way we talk about accessibility. Most people are taught that “web accessibility means that people with disabilities can use the Web”—the official definition from the W3C. This is wrong. Web accessibility means that people can use the web.  Not “people with disabilities.” Not “blind people and deaf people.” Not “people who have cognitive disabilities” or “men who are color blind” or “people with motor disabilities.” People. People who are using the web. People who are using what you’re building.We need to stop invoking the internal stereotypes we have about who is disabled.

We need to recognize that it is none of our business why our audience is using the web the way they’re using it.

We can reframe accessibility in terms of what we provide, not what other people lack. When we treat all of our users as whole people, regardless of their abilities, then we are able to approach accessibility as just another solvable—valuable—technical challenge to overcome.

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Read full article at Source: Reframing Accessibility for the Web · An A List Apart Article

Accessibility and the Digital Service Standard | Digital Transformation Agency

Post-it notes with graphic representations of different disabilities

Accessibility has been a government priority for many years.

The release of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines version 2.0 (or WCAG 2.0) set a new standard for accessibility. But for those of us who work in government, there is more to consider.

Accessibility must go beyond the technical requirements. As I covered in my presentation for Inclusive Design 24, for a product or service to be accessible it must consider all users’ needs at every stage of development.

The Digital Service Standard has been designed with accessibility as a core focus. It aims to help make government services easier, simpler and faster for all users — including those with disability. By understanding and addressing user needs, we improve the user experience for everyone.

The Digital Service Standard continues to require WCAG 2.0 conformance for all government digital services. But, it also requires teams to go further.

The Digital Service Standard

The Digital Service Standard applies to all new and redesigned government services (informational and transactional) and all existing high volume transactional services. …

 

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Read full article at Source: Accessibility and the Digital Service Standard | Digital Transformation Agency

Accessibility Testing: Checkers & Development Tools Review

Tools of the Trade

In a different article, I outline the basics foundations of accessibility standards: “Understanding s508 & WCAG 2.0“. To further expand this, let’s look at various development tools to help author accessible content conformant to the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (“WCAG”) 2.0 standards.

Getting Started

For a primer or refresher on what the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) is review the W3 Org website and its associated entries on this subject at https://www.w3.org/WAI/.

Checkers and Tools

W3 Org offers a great list of available tools for developers to use when checking content for accessibility conformance at https://www.w3.org/WAI/ER/tools/. Various filters can be applied to this list, in order to narrow-down best options. For this article, I applied the following filters:

  • Guidelines > WCAG 2.0 – W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0
  • Languages > English
  • License > Free and License > Open Source

From the filtered-list, I chose to explore the following tools/checkers:

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Read full article at Source.

 

Four Free Tools for Automated Accessibility Testing of Web Apps

Designing and developing for web accessibility has become a requirement of modern computing. Depending on the content and complexity of your project requirements, it can also be a very difficult pursuit. Two colleagues of mine have already written excellent articles exploring the need for and design of accessible web sites: Designing Accessible Software – Breaking Down WCAG 2.0 and Easy Design & Front-End Practices for Improving Accessibility. According to the experts at Deque Systems, somewhere between 20%….

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Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Four Free Tools for Automated Accessibility Testing of Web Apps