Tag Archives: accessibility

We need to talk about Accessibility on Chatbots

What happens when a blind person wants to use your chatbot?

This idea started after I did a research on UX for autonomous cars or self-driving cars. I did some interviews with 4 people, one of them being blind. I was really surprised to know that she can fully take care of herself and go around using her phone and guide dog. She uses her phone and her dog as interfaces to do something that (unfortunately) she is not able to.

After the interviews, I started my UX research and then, another surprise: the aspects of UX for self-driving cars — which I noticed basically two:

  • Visual design — “how can we let people know what the car sees?” Tons of (interesting) concepts of visual design to let people understand and see what the car sees while it’s driving itself.
  • Affordances — “How can we make people interact with the car?” I have seen nice buttons, panels and clues that help people interact with the cars.

With those two main aspects in mind, I started questioning myself:

What about blind people? How will they use self-driving cars?

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: We need to talk about Accessibility on Chatbots

Accessibility in the classroom—tools that impact my students – Office Blogs

Creating a collaborative, inclusive classroom has many moving parts and pieces—and finding the right balance can be challenging. As a special education teacher, I am constantly on the hunt for technology and tools that give students with disabilities an environment that is personalized, differentiated and yet as close to their peers’ experience as possible. I have been an itinerant teacher, a distance education math teacher at a residential school and currently a resource room teacher—without the resource room.

When I work with my students and determine how to meet their needs, I think a lot about their accommodations rather than their modifications. The outcomes for a student can have a very dramatic effect on their learning.

In my accompanying blog post, “Accommodations versus modifications in an inclusive classroom,” I outline the important differences between accommodations and modifications to accessibly personalizing student learning. With Windows 10 and Office 365—free for teachers and students—I have been able to find and use many of the accommodations that I have been looking for making consumption of materials, content creation, collaboration and organization possible for students using the same technology and tools as their peers.

These tools help my students to consume content, create content, collaborate inclusively and stay organized.

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Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility in the classroom—tools that impact my students – Office Blogs

Why we need to make web accessibility a priority

The world has never been more socially aware than it is today; in recent years the world and our society has taken important steps to becoming a more accepting and inclusive one. However, there is still aspects of day to day life that are living in the past and one of them is the Web. While this may seem disputable due to the fact that new technology puts the Web in the driving seat of development, it has limited accessibility which is making it outdated. The Web has benefitted a large majority but certainly not everyone – and not for a lack of trying.

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Why do we need it?

The guides successfully highlighted the need for websites to improve their design and function in order to become more accessible, preventing the exclusion of people with disabilities. Improving accessibility can be something as basic as decluttering your layout, which may seem simple but the process behind requires a lot of effort; deciding what gets priority and how to relay the same amount of information through a lot less. The result not only helps people with disabilities to navigate your site a lot better but also looks better, helping your business to appeal to a wider audience.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Why we need to make web accessibility a priority – boxChilli Digital Marketing Hampshire

wA11y – The Web Accessibility Toolbox WordPress Plugin

Boost your WordPress accessibility! The Web Accessibility Toolbox contains tools to spot deficits in accessibility and suggestions on how to better it.

Recently released, the wA11y plugin consists of tools to check and correct your WordPress site’s accessibility. (The name is derived from a11y, the shorthand way of writing accessibility, with “w” representing Web.)

 

The plugin was developed by Rachel Carden, a software engineer at Disney Interactive and accessibility advocate.

I decided to give wA11y a spin to see what it could do.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: wA11y – The Web Accessibility Toolbox WordPress Plugin

Writing HTML with accessibility in mind

Writing HTML with accessibility in mind

An introduction to web accessibility. Tips on how to improve your markup and provide users with more and betters ways to navigate and interact with your site. If you don’t want to read the preface, jump right to the tips.

Personal development and change in perspective When I made my first website my highest priority was to get content online. I didn’t care much about usability, accessibility, performance, UX or browser compatibility. Why would I? …

If you don’t want to read the preface, jump right to the tips.

Personal development and change in perspective

When I made my first website my highest priority was to get content online. I didn’t care much about usability, accessibility, performance, UX or browser compatibility. Why would I? I made a robust table based layout and I offered a 800×600 and a 1024×768 version of my site. On top of that, I informed users that the website was optimized for Internet Explorer 5.

This was of course before I started to work professionally as a web designer and my perspective in what was important changed.

Years later, instead of dictating the requirements for my websites, I started to optimize them for all major browsers.

Beginning with Ethan Marcotte’s game changing article I started caring about devices as well.

Making websites for all kinds or browsers and devices is great, but pretty much useless if the websites are too slow. So I learned everything about critical CSS, speed indices, font loading, CDNs and so on.

Getting started with accessibility (a11y)


But accessibility isn’t just yet another item on our to-do list to cross off before we launch our website. Accessibility is the foundation of what we do as web designers and web developers and it’s our obligation to treat it as such.

I spent the last few months reading, listening and talking about web accessibility. It took me some time to get my head around a few things and I’m still at the beginning, but the more I learn the more I’m surprised how much I can do right now without having to learn anything completely new.

In this series of articles, I want to share some of my newly acquired knowledge with you. You shouldn’t treat the tips I’m going to give you as a check list but as a starting point. Incorporating these techniques into your workflow will get you started with accessibility and hopefully motivate you to learn and care more about your users.


Without further ado, here are my accessibility tips:

Source: Writing HTML with accessibility in mind – Medium

Prototyping accessibility in web and mobile UI design

Adaptable, interactive and coherent prototypes for users with disabilities. Covering accessibility in the prototyping phase of web and app design.

Pay close attention to color, contrast and visual hierarchy

Make your interactive UI elements more interactive

Don’t crowd me!

Make your app accessible by being adaptable

“Flexibility is the key to ensuring that your website is accessible to everyone.” Shaun Anderson, Hobo Web

Prototyping responsive design is actually pretty easy. With Justinmind prototyping tool, it really only involves creating a set of screens of different sizes (to represent the different screens sizes that your users use), adding the content to each screen, and adding linking events between the screens. In fact, we’ve created a nifty tutorial in our Support section to teach you step by step.

Don’t forget the user testing

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Prototyping accessibility in web and mobile UI design

Developing Shopify Themes with Accessibility in Mind

We want to help you get excited about accessibility, understand its importance within the web industry, and inspire you to integrate accessibility checks in your daily development workflow. We’ll also demonstrate some simple ways to make your clients’ online stores the best in the world, for everyone.

The importance of web accessibilityAccessibility, also know to many as simply a11y, is all about using design and code strategically to make the content of your websites or online stores consumable for all

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Developing Shopify Themes with Accessibility in Mind

Apple brings AirPod-style streaming, Live Listen accessibility to MFi hearing aids

 

Apple has enhanced its iOS accessibility features for users with hearing impairments, adapting its enhanced Bluetooth-based streaming to Made For iPhone hearing aids while introducing Live Listen, a feature that uses an iPhone’s mic to focus on conversations in loud environments.

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Apple brings AirPod-style streaming, Live Listen accessibility to MFi hearing aids

17 Adjustments You Can Make to Your Website  for Better Accessibility

Web developer Mary Gillen shares 17 adjustments you can make to your website today that make it more accessible to visitors with disabilities. WCAG 2.0

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 17 Adjustments You Can Make to Your Website Today That Make It More17 Website Adjustments You Can Make Today for Better Accessibility Accessible to Visitors with Disabilities |