Tag Archives: accessibility

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility | Accessibility | Posters

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility

Karwai Pun, 2 September 2016 — Design, User research

Karwai Pun is an interaction designer currently working on Service Optimisation to make existing and new services better for our users. Karwai is part of an accessibility group at Home Office Digital, leading on autism, and has created these dos and don’ts posters as a way of approaching accessibility from a design perspective.

Dos and don’ts

The dos and don’ts of designing for accessibility are general guidelines, best design practices for making our services accessible. Currently, we have six different posters in our series that cater to users from these areas: low vision, deaf and hard of hearing, dyslexia, those with motor disabilities, users on the autistic spectrum and users of screen readers.

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Read full article at Source: Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility | Accessibility

PAVE 2.0: A New Generation of the Web Tool for PDF Accessibility 

The ICT-Accessibility Lab of the ZHAW, in collaboration with the Swiss Blind and Visually Impaired Association (SBV), has developed a web tool called PAVE which quickly and easily makes existing PDF documents accessible.

This is critical for allowing existing screen-reading programs to read the correct content. With PAVE 2.0, the existing web tool has been fundamentally revised and extended with a new paragraph detection feature.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: PAVE 2.0: A New Generation of the Web Tool for PDF Accessibility Global Alliance on Accessible Technologies and Environments

The ultimate guide to web content accessibility

Websites with standards-compliant code all follow the typical W3C standards. But there’s a whole different level of compliance when it comes to WCAG, also known as the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines.

The same people who produce the HTML5/CSS3 specs organize and officiate these guidelines, so it’s truly an international system of coding standards. Most web developers never bother with WCAG accessibility, but it’s becoming a huge aspect of the internet.

If you’re looking to understand accessibility or just want to delve a bit deeper into the subject, then this guide is for you. I’ll explain some basics of WCAG conformance for a beginner, along with all the tools and resources you’ll need to keep learning along the way.

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Read full article at Source: The ultimate guide to web content accessibility – InVision Blog

Accessibility Checker Goes Open Source

It’s Global Accessibility Awareness Day today! To celebrate it in a big way, we would like to announce that as of today, Accessibility Checker for CKEditor will be available also under an Open Source GPL license. If you care about accessibility, want to learn more about how important it is, and get to know our new product, read on!

The StoryAccessibility support has always been a priority issue at CKSource. CKEditor complies with most important industry standards, recommendations and checklists plus it includes a number of features that make it easy to use with assistive technologies.Last year we decided to give our dedication to web accessibility a big boost and entered the market with Accessibility Checker – an innovative tool that enables you to check your content for accessibility issues and fix them before you go live.​

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Read full article at Source: Accessibility Checker Goes Open Source | CKSource.com

Effectively including accessibility into web developer training – Karl Groves

…Today, I’d like to follow “Your computer school sucks” with some actual guidance for web developer training schools and bootcamps.

Do not treat accessibility as its own topic

A few years ago, I wrote a series of blog posts under the theme Selling Accessibility. The content for many of those posts was driven by interviews I did with a number of people in the accessibility field, one of whom was Cher Travis-Ellis from CSU Fresno. Higher Education has some unique challenges when it comes to online accessibility, especially when it comes to the amount of content being created and the large numbers of non-technical people who create that content. During our discussions, Cher shared with me a neat trick she used when training CSU Fresno staff on accessible content creation: add the accessibility training to all the other training. Unless there’s a really specific technique that deals only with accessibility, nobody really needs to know that you’re teaching them how to make something accessible. For instance, if you’re teaching someone how to use MS Word and you talk about using actual headings instead of bolded text, the accessibility aspect of that practice doesn’t really matter. In other words, you’re teaching people how to do a good job, anyway. The same thing goes for web development. Many accessibility best practices are also just quality best practices. Teach people how to do a good job and, when it comes to techniques that are specific to accessibility, that should be in the core curriculum too.

Discuss the role of “markup” in Hypertext markup language

Discuss the Document Object Model, including Object-Oriented Principles like Abstraction, Inheritance, and Encapsulation

Discuss user input devices

Discuss quality

Discuss basic user expectations, including predictability of the interface

Expect More

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Read full article at Source: Effectively including accessibility into web developer training – Karl Groves

Microsoft Tackles Office Mobile Accessibility, Adds Excel Toolset

Microsoft announces upcoming accessibility enhancements for Office 365 Android and iOS apps and adds several new data transformation options to Excel.

Building on Office’s existing accessibility options for visually impaired users, Microsoft revealed that it plans to add new capabilities.”

I am excited to announce that Office 365 teams are not only working on enhancing the usability of VoiceOver with Office 365 iOS apps and Narrator with Windows 10 Mobile apps, but also the usability of TalkBack with Office 365 Android apps,” stated John Jendrezak, accessibility lead and partner director of program management for the Microsoft Office Engineering group, in a recent blog post.

VoiceOver and TalkBack are text-to-speech technologies that help users navigate their software audibly.

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Read full article at Source: Microsoft Tackles Office Mobile Accessibility, Adds Excel Toolset

Google’s Latest Accessibility Feature Is So Good, Everyone Will Use It | Co.Design | business + design

Google’s Latest Accessibility Feature Is So Good, Everyone Will Use It

Though it was developed for users with severe motor impairment, Voice Access could revolutionize how anyone uses their phone.

Announced this week at I/O 2016 as something that will ship with Android N, Voice Access is a way for people with severe motor impairment to control every aspect of their phones using their voices. But once you see it in action, the broader impact of Voice Access is immediately obvious.


Here’s how it works. When Voice Access is installed, you can enable it with Android’s “Okay Google” command by just saying: “Okay Google, turn on Voice Access.” Once it’s on, it’s always listening—and you don’t have to use the Okay Google command anymore. With Voice Access, all of the UI elements that are normally tap targets are overlaid by a series of numbers. You can tell Voice Access to “tap” these targets by saying the corresponding number aloud.

But these numbers are actually meant to serve as a backup method of control: You can also just tell Voice Assistant what you want to do. For example, you could ask it to “open camera,” and then tell it to “tap shutter.” Best of all? Any app should work with Voice Access, as long as it’s already following Google’s accessibility guidelines.

Technically, Voice Access builds upon two things that Google’s been laying the groundwork on for a while now. The first is natural language processing, which allows Google Assistant to understand your voice.

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Read full article at Source: Google’s Latest Accessibility Feature Is So Good, Everyone Will Use It | Co.Design | business + design

Why accessibility is good for business (according to my mechanic) » Simply Accessible

I was lucky to find my mechanic, Pete. There was only one problem. A single, 6” step that stood between my wheelchair and his garage.

There was only one problem.

A single, 6” step that stood between my wheelchair and Pete’s office. Most people wouldn’t even notice, but it was enough of a hindrance that I couldn’t get into the garage.

Each time I needed to have work done on my car, I’d have to call ahead and make sure Pete or one of his employees could meet me in the yard to discuss the issues with my car, get the keys, or arrange payment.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Why accessibility is good for business (according to my mechanic) » Simply Accessible

Claiming Crip: Accessibility Is Not “A Nice Thing To Do”

The truth is, accessibility is not “a nice thing to do”. Accessibility is a necessity. Even more than that accessibility is a right. When we frame access and accessibility as “a nice thing to do” it becomes an act of charity, and even an afterthought. When we talk about accessibility as an act of kindness or a nicety we eliminate its absolute necessity. It is absolutely nice for a stranger to shovel a curb cut to help somebody out, but the actual act of having a clear curb cut to use is so much more than a nice thing, it is an absolute requirement for many disabled people to go about living their daily lives. Without shoveled curb cuts I would not be able to get to work. Without shoveled curb cuts I would not even be able to leave my apartment complex.

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Read full article at Source: Claiming Crip: Accessibility Is Not “A Nice Thing To Do”