Tag Archives: ada

Does Your Company Website Violate the ADA? Part 2-Top Ten Considerations for a Web Accessibility Policy

In Part I of this series, we discussed the uncertainty concerning whether the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to websites of private businesses, and, if so, the specific requirements that would apply to websites. Additionally, we discussed that even if under no legal obligation to do so, businesses need to be aware of the current status of the law concerning web accessibility. Below, we address why businesses should consider the adoption of a formal web accessibility policy and present the top 10 most important considerations affecting the components of a web accessibility policy.

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Read full article at Source: Does Your Company Website Violate the ADA? Part 2-Top Ten Considerations for a Web Accessibility Policy – Lexology

Does Your Company Website Violate the ADA? Part 1

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is most commonly thought of as prohibiting workplace discrimination against individuals with disabilities and requiring the elimination of physical barriers to public locations.  But a recent wave of litigation presents a less obvious application of the ADA that may have a far broader impact: the potential application of the ADA to websites.  Before discussing the recent litigation, we briefly address two threshold questions (1) does the ADA apply to websites at all

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Read full article at Source: Does Your Company Website Violate the ADA? | Publications | Carlton Fields

Mobile Apps Like Uber and Airbnb Raise Novel ADA Title III Issues

Are online-only businesses like Uber and Airbnb covered by Title III of the ADA, and what would coverage mean when the businesses don’t own or operate the vehicles or accommodations that customers use?

Title III of the ADA only applies to owners, operators, lessors, and lessees of “place[s] of public accommodations.” Businesses such as Uber and Airbnb do not fit neatly fit into this definition because, as web-only businesses, they are not actual “places” of public accommodation.  Moreover, they don’t own, operate, or the goods or services – the vehicles or accommodations – used by the end customer.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Mobile Apps Like Uber and Airbnb Raise Novel ADA Title III Issues | ADA Title III News & Insights

The high cost of digital discrimination: why companies should care about web accessibility | The Guardian

A 2011 survey by the Pew Research Center found that 2%, or 4.7 million American adults, said they suffered from a disability or illness that made it difficult or impossible for them to use the internet.

For a growing number of companies, that inaccessibility comes at a cost. The US Department of Justice (DOJ), citing the Americans with Disabilities Act, has sued and negotiated millions of dollars in settlements with big brands such as Target, Disney and Netflix, for not designing their websites to accommodate the browsing needs of disabled customers.

Yet last month, the DOJ once again delayed a plan to issue regulations spelling out the criteria necessary for websites to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. It had previously planned to issue the rules in June of this year, but it then postponed the date to April 2016. It now expects to release the regulations in 2018.

Websites designed to be disability friendly typically include features such as accurate auto-translation, better speech recognition, enhanced search engine optimization and browser zoom. Many of these features also improve the internet experience for other users. Text transcripts and video captioning are a must for the deaf, but are also widely used by the hearing: 80% of TV viewers use closed captioning for reasons other than hearing loss, according to a recent UK study.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The high cost of digital discrimination: why companies should care about web accessibility | Guardian Sustainable Business | The Guardian

5 Things You Need to Know About Web Accessibility

JANUARY 8, 2016

This fall, the Department of Justice postponed its proceeding to adopt regulations on web accessibility for a few more years.

The prolonged delay in those regulations has created a perfect storm for more litigation under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). As a result, many companies should be adding web accessibility to their list of top priorities for 2016.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 5 Things You Need to Know About Web Accessibility

ADA 25th anniversary: The Internet should be accessible for the disabled.

Last month FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly told us the Internet is “not a necessity.”

At a speech to the Internet Innovation Alliance, an organization that promotes broadband accessibility, O’Rielly said people “can and do” live without Internet access. “Instead,” he offered, “the term necessity should be reserved to those items that humans cannot live without such as food, shelter, and water.”

When he made this statement, the commissioner was presumably thinking of the parts of life online that sometimes irk us: teens’ eyes locked on their smartphones, the innumerable cat videos, polarizing rants of political candidates and other talking heads on social media. His understanding appears to be based on Vint Cerf’s feeling that technology “is an enabler of rights, not a right itself.”

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Read full article at Source: ADA 25th anniversary: The Internet should be accessible for the disabled.

The Legal Ramifications of Inaccessible Websites

The Internet has dramatically changed the way businesses operate and engage in commerce.

Today, businesses routinely make much more information about their products and services available to the public and potential consumers by posting it on their websites. As a result, many people can easily access this information seven days a week, 24 hours a day. Yet, millions of people with print disabilities still cannot enjoy the benefits of many of these websites because they are inaccessible to them.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The Legal Ramifications of Inaccessible Websites

10 Crucial Ways We Can Make Society More Inclusive for People With Disabilities | Kristin Duquette

The Americans with Disabilities Act celebrated its 25th year of coming into law last month, and while it has changed countless lives, it has become apparent that inclusion loopholes still exist.The ADA was designed to have people with disabilities become viable and authentic citizens within the United States, but access to resources are still denied and the disability community continues to fight for basic civil rights.

On the outside it’s easy to assume that because of the ADA, discrimination never occurs and full equality prevails for every person with a disability…. Just because a president signed a piece of legislation into law doesn’t mean that a) it’s fully enforced and b) it 100 percent changed our culture on how we view the disability community.

Disabled or able-bodied, we all have the power and responsibility to make society more inclusive for everyone. From lived experiences to listening to the disability community, here are 10 ways we can continue to make our world more accepting of people with disabilities.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 10 Crucial Ways We Can Make Society More Inclusive for People With Disabilities | Kristin Duquette