Tag Archives: app

National Gallery’s Tom Roberts’ Auslan captioning app helps hearing impaired art-lovers

Visiting an art gallery would seem a predominantly visual experience, but while most art-lovers can expand their knowledge with an audio tour, people who are deaf or hearing impaired usually miss out.

Thanks to new captioning and Auslan tours for the National Gallery’s Tom Roberts’ exhibition, art-lovers of all abilities can find out the secrets behind the masterpieces, all from the palm of their hand.The tours are available to download for free on the Open Access Tours app, alongside similar versions for some of Australia’s most popular arts and cultural venues.

Hearing impaired and deaf art-lovers can find out more information about the artworks in the NGA’s Tom Roberts’ show thanks to the Open Access Tours app. Photo: Graham TidyHearing impaired gallery regular Haydn Daw said the captioning takes the pressure off for visitors straining to hear audio commentary.

“If you can read it it’s so much more relaxing and you can get the story right,” he said.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: National Gallery’s Tom Roberts’ Auslan captioning app helps hearing impaired art-lovers

Deaf News: Deaf woman is awarded e-Accessibility scholarship for mobile app for interpreters and carers | The Limping Chicken

A Deaf woman has been awarded an EDF-Oracle e-Accessibility scholarship for her project developing a mobile application to seamlessly connect persons with disabilities with caregivers, interpreters and assistants.Caroline Hurley is studying computer science at Open University in the United Kingdom.

THE AWARDED PROJECT

Caroline’s project is to develop a mobile application to seamlessly connect persons with disabilities with caregivers, interpreters and assistants. Through this application, persons with disabilities can be able to quickly check care workers’ nearest location and their availability. For example, a case study showed how a deaf person spent an entire day to find a sign language interpreter for a next-day doctor’s appointment, since there are very few interpreters in the European Union (EU). Caroline’s application can be beneficial to people with disabilities requiring ‘face-to-face’ care workers urgently.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Deaf News: Deaf woman is awarded e-Accessibility scholarship for mobile app for interpreters and carers | The Limping Chicken

How a Running App Helps a Blind Runner Train Solo

Before Simon Wheatcroft starts running near his home in Doncaster, Great Britain, he finds where the grass begins on his left and takes one step to his right, positioning himself in the center of a ribbon of sidewalk. Like any run, light poles and street signs jut slightly onto the path on occasion.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How a Running App Helps a Blind Runner Train Solo

Accessibility is not a ‘Feature’, and Developers Should Never Treat it as Such | AppleVis

But accessibility is different. Support for VoiceOver (and other assistive technologies built into iOS) isn’t a feature, something “nice to have” if a group of people vote it high enough on a list. Rather, implementing accessibility support is an essential part of the design process which ensures all users have equal access to an app. Implementing support for VoiceOver isn’t an idea you check off the list once done and forget about; it requires an ongoing commitment, and it requires a developer who understands the value of inclusive design. (An accessible design is also more likely to be a design which is more usable by everyone, even those not using accessibility features.) Implementing support for VoiceOver means the difference between whether blind people can use an app or not. And at its core, implementing VoiceOver support is about doing the right thing—simply because it’s the right thing to do.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility is not a ‘Feature’, and Developers Should Never Treat it as Such | AppleVis

Taxi app Gett makes travel easier for disabled Londoners | TechRadar

Ride-hailing app Gett has announced a new partnership with Assist-MI, an app that helps disabled users interact with services and communicate their access needs.

Using the app, disabled customers will now be able to hail one of 8000 black cabs in the capital (or 2000 more elsewhere in Britain) with priority booking and up to 30% off fares.

It will work by going into your Assist-MI app and logging in with your Gett details, your two accounts will be associated together to enable you to take advantage of the new service.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Taxi app Gett makes travel easier for disabled Londoners | TechRadar

Post Falls 5th grade inventor creates app to help people with disabilities

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Alexander Knoll stayed after school one day recently to have a little chat with educators at the North Idaho STEM Charter Academy in Rathdrum.

“I love helping people and I’m excited to tell you about the app I’m trying to develop called Ability App,” the Post Falls fifth-grader said. “The idea is simple .

“This bright 10-year-old with red hair and freckles is getting good at addressing groups of adults, explaining his big idea and appearing confident and composed.

“The simple-to-use app can be accessed for free on any computer or handheld device .”

Much like Yelp is to eating out, Ability App would give users such details as the locations of wheelchair ramps, accessible boat launches and hiking trails, service animal-friendly locations, and restaurants with Braille menus. It also would contain information on grocery delivery, occupational therapy, transportation and mobility, and disability-friendly job listings, among other services.

Alex even imagined voice-activation and eye-tracking features for users who don’t have use of their limbs. His passion for drawing and design led him to create a clever logo that appears on the app’s Facebook page, website and business cards for the venture. His mother, Anne Knoll, has been at his side, assisting Alex on the computer.

He has had a whirlwind year. Last March, Ability App took best in show at Invent Idaho, a statewide student invention competition. He got to explain his project to Gov. Butch Otter, first lady Lori Otter and state lawmakers at the state Capitol in Boise.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Post Falls 5th grade inventor creates app to help people with disabilities | Local & Regional | Boise, Meridian, Nampa, Caldwell, Idaho News, Weather, Sports and Breaking News – KBOI 2

The iPhone setting that changed this man’s life.

..Todd Stabelfeldt is able to control the entire iPhone interface, thanks to an iOS setting called Switch Control.

Also known as switch access, it’s an accessibility feature for people with physical disabilities who can’t use a touchscreen in the traditional way. It turns a complicated user interface into something that can be controlled with basic inputs.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The iPhone setting that changed this man’s life – Oct. 21, 2015

Accessibility: Towards a more inclusive web with Microsoft Edge and Windows 10

Windows has used the Microsoft Active Accessibility (MSAA) API since Windows 98 to express buttons, menus, text, and other on-screen content to assistive technology. Assistive technology vendors have used the MSAA API (along with other app-specific APIs like the DOM in IE, the Office Object Model in Office, and even scraping video drivers) to make text and interfaces more accessible. These techniques have the disadvantage of varying wildly between different applications and documents, which leads to a fragmented and unreliable experience. As user interfaces, documents, and the web significantly increased in complexity, Microsoft introduced the more modern UI Automation (UIA) API in Windows Vista as the successor to MSAA.

UIA was designed to expose more information about the user interface and structured documents, improve performance, and be portable across platforms. Because UIA replaces a variety of potentially unreliable and non-interoperable techniques with a single API, it reduces software complexity, allows developers to express novel UI concepts more easily, and improves stability and user experience consistency between web and native apps, across all types of assistive technology.

In Microsoft Edge, we are thrilled to finally have the opportunity to make the transition from MSAA to UIA, alongside enormous complementary investments in rearchitecting our DOM implementation and rewriting the browser interface from scratch. The change to UIA is our largest investment in browser accessibility ever, and it lays the foundation for a more inclusive web experience for users who depend on assistive technology in Windows 10. Because EdgeHTML is used throughout Windows 10 (inside Universal Windows Apps, in Cortana, etc.), these benefits will have an impact beyond the browser. Users will also benefit from the evergreen nature of the EdgeHTML engine.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility: Towards a more inclusive web with Microsoft Edge and Windows 10

Map Traffic Lights for the Visually Impaired

Imagine trying to cross a busy city street without being able to see the traffic lights change color or glance down the road to make sure the oncoming cars have stopped. For the blind and visually impaired, that’s just one aspect of navigating the world that presents a challenge, but an app called SeeLight aims to solve this problem, one traffic light at a time.

Only 10 percent of traffic lights are equipped with audible signals and tactile paving that helps the visually impaired “feel” their way safely across the road, according to Hungry Boys, the Russian digital agency that pioneered development of the SeeLight app.

While it might not be realistic to expect traffic lights worldwide to soon be optimized for use by the blind, with this app, it might not matter.

The app, which is available globally for free download on iTunes, helps users “see” crossing lights by providing information such as the distance between the user and the closest light, whether there is tactile pavement on the road and how many seconds remain until the light changes from green to red or vice versa. Voice navigation helps users safely and confidently get around town, whether they’re walking to their local supermarket or exploring a new city.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Map Traffic Lights for the Visually Impaired