Tag Archives: apple

Face ID Accessibility. Apple offers some answers

Apple today made a series of hardware announcements.

Understandably, the announcement that has caused the most social media chatter in the blind community relates to the iPhone X, and it’s new Face ID feature.

Apple has earned our trust over the years by ensuring that its products are fully accessible from their initial launch, so few observers were in any doubt that Apple would have given thought to the accessibility of this new feature. However, were there limitations of the technology that simply made it a non-starter for some people?

I wrote to Apple, and quickly received a response to some of my initial questions.

My questions stem from the fact that I am congenitally blind. My particular eye condition causes my eyes to look small and a little sunken, and they are often closed. Further, I have a form of congenital cataracts. I was curious to know whether Face ID would work for someone like me and others I know with prosthetic eyes, given that during the keynote, Apple indicated that the iPhone X would not unlock unless you gave the phone your attention.

Apple says the following.

 

The iPhone X has been designed with a number of accessibility features to support its use.

For VoiceOver users, Face ID will prompt you as to how to move your head during set up in order to complete a scan. If you do not want Face ID to require attention, you can open Settings > General > Accessibility, and disable Require Attention for Face ID. This is automatically disabled if you enable VoiceOver during initial set up.

What’s new with Accessibility in iOS 11?

iOS 11 has some helpful new options in Accessibility to assist any person and everybody customise their iPhone and iPad interface to paintings with them and for them. Here is what’s new.

Sensible Invert

Sensible Invert is a brand new atmosphere to be added to the Invert Colours phase of Accessibility in iOS. While colour inversion inverts the whole lot at the display, Sensible Invert inverts solely the spaces the place it can be deemed vital for somebody who calls for it. Differently, photographs keep true, and different insignificant components of the person interface stay unchanged.

To allow Sensible Invert:

  1. Release Settings out of your House Display screen.
  2. Faucet Common.
  3. Faucet Accessibility
  4. Faucet Show Lodging.
  5. Faucet Invert Colours.
  6. Faucet the transfer subsequent to Sensible Invert.

Auto-brightness

Within the Show Lodging phase of Accessibility, you’ll now get right of entry to the Auto-brightness function to allow or disable it. When enabled, your display will brighten or dim, relying at the lighting fixtures stipulations round you. For those who disable it, it will impact your total battery existence, however would possibly not mess along with your eyes if lighting fixtures stipulations trade .

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At this month’s WWDC, Apple unveiled refined accessibility tools

…for all the focus on refinement, there also is a cavalcade of new stuff to be excited about. As it pertains to accessibility, some obvious highlights for me are the 10.5” iPad Pro and the corresponding iPad-centric enhancements in iOS 11. I’m also psyched for smaller niceties too, such as the ability to automatically enter Reader View in Safari on iOS and macOS. I use this mode all the time; it makes reading on the web a much more pleasant—and accessible!—experience. Reader View is one of my favorite and most-used tools on both iOS and the Mac.

Apple announced a boatload of stuff at WWDC, and it’s quite a task to process it all and ruminate on what it means. With this sentiment in mind, here are my three biggest takeaways around accessibility and the conference that matter most.

 

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Read full article at Source: At this month’s WWDC, Apple unveiled refined accessibility tools | TechCrunch

Accessibility features in macOS and iOS that everyone should try

iphone mac pixabayIf you’re someone who doesn’t have any specific reasons to go there, you may have never explored the Accessibility settings on your Mac, iPhone, or iPad. While it’s true that those settings are there primarily for people who have special physical needs to modify how a device’s interface works, the fact is, many people who don’t consider themselves in need of any sort of accommodation can find something of value in these settings.

Accessibility has become a place where Apple buries some specific, nitpicky details about how its devices behave–and that’s why you should take a stroll through those settings sometime just to see if they solve problems you didn’t even realize were solvable. Here are some of my favorites:

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How major technology companies are improving accessibility for people with disabilities

The year 2016 saw an increase in focus on accessibility features to allow people with disabilities to access technology. The Microsoft Event that saw the launch of the Surface Studio on October 26, and the Apple event a day later on October 27 which saw the launch of the new Macbook Pro laptops, both opened with a video showcasing the efforts by the two companies at making their products more universally accessible. Earlier in the year, during the Facebook F8 conference, Facebook demonstrated a a new API with features for making user interfaces built using the React library more accessible to visually impaired users.

For the visually impaired, touchscreens are scary because they are devices where all controls defer to the screen. Nirmita Narasimhan, a Policy Director at The Centre for Internet and Society (CIS) in Bengaluru has contributed to policy decisions by the Indian Government to help the visually impaired better use technology. One of these measures was allowing the blind to convert ebooks to any format that would allow them to read it. Narasimhan believes that accessibility to new technologies can improve greatly for the visually impaired if major app distributors such as Apple and Google take efforts to make sure the same application works for blind users as well.

 

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How a Smart Home Empowers People with Disabilities

While advances in personal technology continue at a rapid pace, at times their designers seem to forget about the population that could perhaps benefit from it the most. Stabelfeldt says just the ability to charge a phone with a wheelchair didn’t even exist until a few years ago.

But features like Apple’s “Home” app allow Stabelfeldt to control a variety of smart accessories in his house — from door locks and window shades, to lights and his garage door. The best part for Stabelfeldt? He can command Apple’s intelligent digital assistant Siri to work it all.


A Game Changer
“We put a lot of time and effort into making sure our products are as accessible as possible for all users,” said Apple’s Sarah Herrlinger. She has worked at Apple for nearly 14 years and is their Senior Manager of accessibility policy and initiatives.

“For some people, doing something like turning on your lights or opening a blind or changing your thermostat might be seen as a convenience, but for others, that represents empowerment, and independence, and dignity,” she told NBC News.

“HomeKit and Switch Control and Siri have given me a lot of value and a lot of opportunities to demonstrate that I’m a quality man and I’m a man of integrity,” Todd Stabelfeldt. “To get up every day and go to work: Everybody’s valuable, everybody has worth, everybody should have the opportunity to demonstrate it.”

How to Get Your iPhone to Read On-Screen Text Aloud to You

Being able to hear written text on your phone read aloud to you can serve multiple purposes. If you have any type of impaired vision, it can certainly help in that regard. It’s also useful in settings where you don’t have the time nor capability to stare at your phone and read large blocks of text. Perhaps you want to treat whatever your reading as an audiobook of sorts.Whatever the case may be, your iPhone is perfectly capable of reading nearly any text you select back to you. All you first need to do is enable this feature in Settings.

….

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How disabled iPhone users can take control with blinks, nudges and even breath

tecla shield disabled touchscreen teclashield editTim Cook began Apple’s latest product unveiling with a video narrated by a disabled woman using a Mac with the help of an assistive device — a switch that she could bump with the side of her head. Her name is Sady Paulson, and the message couldn’t have been clearer: With the right technology, even people with almost no control over their bodies can interact with the world and harness their own creativity in ways that were previously impossible.

Wireless freedom for disabled people

The video was upbeat and inspirational, meant to affirm Apple’s commitment to accessibility. But what it didn’t show was the struggle those like Paulson have when it comes to controlling a multitude of devices. That head-triggered switch might be her only means of controlling her wheelchair, computer, or phone or tablet. If it’s hardwired into one of these devices, how can it control the others?

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