Tag Archives: blind

Microsoft app that tells the visually impaired what’s in front of them

This free app is helping the visually impaired  

Microsoft is putting its artificial intelligence technology to work to help the visually impaired.

The company said on Wednesday that it’s releasing an iOS app called Seeing AI that uses an iPhone’s camera to tell people about objects in front of them. The app shows off Microsoft’s current capabilities in AI, while also addressing a group that the technology industry too often ignores.

Microsoft first revealed the technology to an audience of developers last year, but at the time it was only shown as working on smart glasses. Now anyone with an iPhone or iPad can try it…

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
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Airpoly Vision us a Truly Visionary App

Image of Aipoly Vision logo

‘Aipoly Vision’ is a very useful object-and-colour recogniser app that helps the blind, vision-impaired, and colour blind to understand their surroundings. It does so by using artificial intelligence to recognise objects through a device’s camera and then announces the name of each object to the user.

The Aipoly(link is external) developers are on a self-declared mission to build scalable vision intelligence. They intend to add facial recognition to the Aipoly Vision app, whereby users will be able to enter the names of people visible in the camera frame for ongoing recognition. They have also indicated that the app will soon be able to be taught new objects. When pointed at an object which is not recognised, users will be able to enter the name of the object which will be remembered the next time that object is encountered.

This app is an excellent example of how emerging technology can make a positive difference to users right now, and it comes with an ‘intelligent torch’ feature which automatically turns on the device’s torch if the camera frame is too dark, allowing the app to work in low-light situations.

Curated by lifekludger

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JAWS screen reader gets more bight

Image of JAWS screen reader logo

Freedom Scientific has recently released JAWS 18.0.2738, which incorporates several important improvements made between the JAWS February 2017 release and this mid April 2017 update, plus dozens of less revolutionary but very practical enhancements.

JAWS (Job Access With Speech) is the world’s most popular screen reader, developed for computer users whose vision loss prevents them from seeing screen content or navigating with a mouse. It allows blind and vision-impaired people to read the screen either with a text-to-speech output or by a refreshable Braille display.

The latest update resolved some minor issues within the software itself, as well as providing a long list of user enhancements and expanded features when using JAWS with Microsoft Office, Google Docs, on a variety of Web Browsers, and in Windows 10.

Source: JAWS screen reader gets more bight | Media Access Australia

Meet the Blind Man Who Convinced Google Its Self-Driving Car Is Finally Ready

Steve Mahan’s solo ride showed it’s time to take the car to market.

Now 63 and having lost his sight, Mahan has become one of those capsule-bound explorers. In October 2015, he became the first member of the public to ride in Google’s self-driving pod-like prototype, alone and on public roads. No steering wheel, no pedals, no human on board to step in should something go wrong.

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Web Accessibility Lessons from Blind and Low Vision Users — Medium

Approximately 10% of US citizens are blind or have some degree of vision loss.

At TransitScreen we are exploring ways to make our digital signage more accessible to blind and low vision (BLV) users. Our work on this project has just begun, but we already learned some important lessons that we wanted to share.

Good code = accessible

Too often accessibility is thought of as extra work to be done after a site is finished. But in reality well-written HTML is already accessible by default, so the majority of the “work” simply involves knowing how to use it correctly and complying with standards.

  • Use semantic markup appropriately by choosing the tag that best describes the content it contains.

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Danger! Testing Accessibility with real people — Medium

As four people who are blind and care deeply about making the web more accessible, we strongly believe user testing should include people with disabilities. But when the results are misinterpreted, it can be dangerous. It can foster action that appears to benefit people with disabilities but ultimately do as much harm as good.

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Blind Arduino Blog: Arduino Setup and Accessibility Tips for Windows

In a world of talking iPhones, sexy accessibility announcements, and high-quality open-source screen readers, the naive sighted person could be forgiven for assuming that we have finally reached the point where a blind person could simply download and use the same exact software tools as everyone else for any given problem.

Blind people know that it is rarely that simple. There are a wide variety of issues that still stand as barriers to equal access in all sorts of situations, and Arduino development on Windows is no exception.

While it is definitely possible to set up an accessible development environment for Arduino on Windows, many of the steps may not be immediately obvious, especially to the beginner.

This post is intended to streamline the Arduino setup process, flagging accessibility work-arounds, and providing a step-by-step guide to setting up the tools you’ll need for Arduino development as a blind maker.

If you are just getting started and don’t know anything about Windows, software development, accessibility, or Arduino, this blog is probably not the best place to start. This article assumes you’re already comfortable with Windows and your screen reader, and that you know what Arduino is and have some motivation to make things with it.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
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Wikispeech project aims to make Wikipedia accessible for vision impaired people

Swedish researchers are developing an open source speech synthesis platform to make Wikimedia-based websites more accessible to blind and vision impaired people.

The platform will be optimised for Wikipedia and aims to provide access in 283 languages, starting with three initial languages next year.

The Wikispeech pilot project is a joint effort between the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Wikimedia Sweden and STTS speech technology services, with further assistance and financial backing provided by the Swedish Post and Telecom Authority.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Wikispeech project aims to make Wikipedia accessible for vision impaired people | Media Access Australia

How a Running App Helps a Blind Runner Train Solo

Before Simon Wheatcroft starts running near his home in Doncaster, Great Britain, he finds where the grass begins on his left and takes one step to his right, positioning himself in the center of a ribbon of sidewalk. Like any run, light poles and street signs jut slightly onto the path on occasion.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How a Running App Helps a Blind Runner Train Solo