Tag Archives: blind

Meet the Blind Man Who Convinced Google Its Self-Driving Car Is Finally Ready

Steve Mahan’s solo ride showed it’s time to take the car to market.

Now 63 and having lost his sight, Mahan has become one of those capsule-bound explorers. In October 2015, he became the first member of the public to ride in Google’s self-driving pod-like prototype, alone and on public roads. No steering wheel, no pedals, no human on board to step in should something go wrong.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Meet the Blind Man Who Convinced Google Its Self-Driving Car Is Finally Ready

Web Accessibility Lessons from Blind and Low Vision Users — Medium

Approximately 10% of US citizens are blind or have some degree of vision loss.

At TransitScreen we are exploring ways to make our digital signage more accessible to blind and low vision (BLV) users. Our work on this project has just begun, but we already learned some important lessons that we wanted to share.

Good code = accessible

Too often accessibility is thought of as extra work to be done after a site is finished. But in reality well-written HTML is already accessible by default, so the majority of the “work” simply involves knowing how to use it correctly and complying with standards.

  • Use semantic markup appropriately by choosing the tag that best describes the content it contains.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Web Accessibility Lessons from Blind and Low Vision Users — Medium

Danger! Testing Accessibility with real people — Medium

As four people who are blind and care deeply about making the web more accessible, we strongly believe user testing should include people with disabilities. But when the results are misinterpreted, it can be dangerous. It can foster action that appears to benefit people with disabilities but ultimately do as much harm as good.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Danger! Testing Accessibility with real people — Medium

Blind Arduino Blog: Arduino Setup and Accessibility Tips for Windows

In a world of talking iPhones, sexy accessibility announcements, and high-quality open-source screen readers, the naive sighted person could be forgiven for assuming that we have finally reached the point where a blind person could simply download and use the same exact software tools as everyone else for any given problem.

Blind people know that it is rarely that simple. There are a wide variety of issues that still stand as barriers to equal access in all sorts of situations, and Arduino development on Windows is no exception.

While it is definitely possible to set up an accessible development environment for Arduino on Windows, many of the steps may not be immediately obvious, especially to the beginner.

This post is intended to streamline the Arduino setup process, flagging accessibility work-arounds, and providing a step-by-step guide to setting up the tools you’ll need for Arduino development as a blind maker.

If you are just getting started and don’t know anything about Windows, software development, accessibility, or Arduino, this blog is probably not the best place to start. This article assumes you’re already comfortable with Windows and your screen reader, and that you know what Arduino is and have some motivation to make things with it.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Blind Arduino Blog: Arduino Setup and Accessibility Tips for Windows

Wikispeech project aims to make Wikipedia accessible for vision impaired people

Swedish researchers are developing an open source speech synthesis platform to make Wikimedia-based websites more accessible to blind and vision impaired people.

The platform will be optimised for Wikipedia and aims to provide access in 283 languages, starting with three initial languages next year.

The Wikispeech pilot project is a joint effort between the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Wikimedia Sweden and STTS speech technology services, with further assistance and financial backing provided by the Swedish Post and Telecom Authority.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Wikispeech project aims to make Wikipedia accessible for vision impaired people | Media Access Australia

How a Running App Helps a Blind Runner Train Solo

Before Simon Wheatcroft starts running near his home in Doncaster, Great Britain, he finds where the grass begins on his left and takes one step to his right, positioning himself in the center of a ribbon of sidewalk. Like any run, light poles and street signs jut slightly onto the path on occasion.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How a Running App Helps a Blind Runner Train Solo

accessibility videos for iOS and android

According to the National Health Interview Survey, there are over 20 million people with vision loss. If you need access to the Internet, it can be upsetting that as devices get smaller, so do the font sizes. The good news is that there are a lot of new and innovative ways to access the web.

… Check out these great features and innovative ways to navigate the websites that you want to access.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: accessibility videos for iOS and android

London Closer to Setting Standard for Commuter Accessibility

Google’s charitable arm has donated $1 million to help spread blind navigation technology throughout cities worldwide. Starting in London, the Wayfindr program will develop an app that works with Bluetooth beacons to guide users through physical environments with audio cues but, more importantly, it’s developing the first open standard for such systems globally.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: London Closer to Setting Standard for Commuter Accessibility

A Smartwatch for the Visually Impaired | XPRIZE

… an idea that could change the way the visually impaired interact with technology. The students created a startup to develop and produce an affordable active Braille smartwatch, called Dot. When wearing Dot, users can check the time, read incoming text messages or tweets, and even e-books–although reading “War and Peace” four characters at a time might not be the most efficient way to catch up on the classics.

Similar to other smartwatches on the market, Dot is designed to pair with a Bluetooth-enabled phone. When a text message arrives on the phone, the app translates it to Braille and sends it to Dot (which vibrates) and then the pins rise and fall to relay the characters. Other Dot features include a watch, alarm and notifications. Initial tests show Dot should last about five days between charges.

Curated by Lifekludger, full article at Source: A Smartwatch for the Visually Impaired | XPRIZE