Tag Archives: checkers

Best Color Contrast Checkers for Accessibility Testing

Whether you are designing, developing, testing or auditing, a contrast ratio checker is the best way to ensure your site or app passes accessibility criteria. As a designer you can use a simple value checker to plug in foreground and background color value as you use them. You could also use other tools to check final design designs in their entirety. As a developer or someone conducting a website accessibility audit, you’ll likely want to use tools that can check completed web pages.

Contrast Ratio Requirements for Text in WCAG 2.0 Level AA & AAA

Accessibility Color Contrast Example
When designing or developing accessible websites, web applications or mobile apps, it may be obvious that text should be very legible. After all, the more difficulty user have reading your information, the less likely they are to interact, engage, purchase or take whatever other action you consider key to success. This is doubly so when developing for persons with low-vision.

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 stipulate two minimum contrast ratios between text and its background color on websites, applications or mobile apps.

To meet the level AA success criteria text smaller than 18 point (or 14 point if bold) must have a 4.5:1 contrast ratio. All larger text must have a contrast ratio of 3:1 or greater.

The more stringent AAA criteria the requires text under 18 point (or 14 point if bold) to exceed a contrast ratio of 7:1. All larger text must have a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Best Color Contrast Checkers for Accessibility Testing – Vance Bell, Philadelphia, PA

How to Make Your Website Accessible to People Who Use a Screen Magnifier

There’s a lot of content out there on how to make your website accessible. But I haven’t seen much on the subject of accessibility to users of screen magnifiers. I’m one of them, and I frequently run into annoying issues on the web.In this article, I’ll give some tips on how you can make your website more accessible to users of screen magnifying software.

Source: How to Make Your Website Accessible to People Who Use a Screen Magnifier

Accessibility Testing: Checkers & Development Tools Review

Tools of the Trade

In a different article, I outline the basics foundations of accessibility standards: “Understanding s508 & WCAG 2.0“. To further expand this, let’s look at various development tools to help author accessible content conformant to the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (“WCAG”) 2.0 standards.

Getting Started

For a primer or refresher on what the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) is review the W3 Org website and its associated entries on this subject at https://www.w3.org/WAI/.

Checkers and Tools

W3 Org offers a great list of available tools for developers to use when checking content for accessibility conformance at https://www.w3.org/WAI/ER/tools/. Various filters can be applied to this list, in order to narrow-down best options. For this article, I applied the following filters:

  • Guidelines > WCAG 2.0 – W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0
  • Languages > English
  • License > Free and License > Open Source

From the filtered-list, I chose to explore the following tools/checkers:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source.

 

Free web accessibility tools round-up — bread crumbs — Medium

 

Free web accessibility tools round-up

If you’re like me, you’re one of the web developers on your team tasked with taking something seemingly-boring – like a mortgage calculator – and making it:

  1. Look and work fantastically. Something like Google Docs meets Facebook meets Spotify meets Snapchat… SnapDocBookify? Yeah, make that.
  2. Meet the demands of the client or business partners, even if they think your mortgage calculator needs a weather widget with room for the 7 day forecast on an Apple Watch.
  3. Fully accessible and WCAG AA compliant.
  4. Wait, what

Yep. Right now, maybe not surprisingly, #3 might seem the most daunting. Thankfully, it doesn’t have to be that bad. Let’s take a look at some of the free tools available that make our lives (and the lives of people with a disability) a bit easier!

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Free web accessibility tools round-up — bread crumbs — Medium