Tag Archives: deaf

Sounding out the web: accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing people [Part 2]

[Part 2]

In my previous post, I spoke with Ruth MacMullen, an academic librarian and copyright specialist from York, about her experience of being deaf and how it affects how she uses the web. In this next post in the series, Ruth shares some of the things that make life easier for her on the web, and we offer some practical tips on how you can improve accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing people.

Provide subtitles/captions

The YouTube video player showing a video about York St John University with closed captions switched on. The captions are displayed over two lines with the end of the sentence cut off.“Subtitles, that’s the really obvious one”, remarks Ruth as we discuss the things that help her the most. In my previous post, she described the frustration of viewing a video posted on Facebook that lacked subtitles.

Subtitles or captions are the words shown at the bottom of videos that explain what’s being said or what’s happening. The term “subtitles” typically refers only to spoken content, whereas “captions” also includes descriptions of non-speech sounds, such as music, applause and laughter. Outside of North America, the terms are often used interchangeably. So when Ruth refers to subtitles on videos, that’s what she’s talking about.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Sounding out the web: accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing people [Part 2] | The Paciello Group – Your Accessibility Partner (WCAG 2.0/508 audits, VPAT, usability and accessible user experience)

Sounding out the web: accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing people [Part 1] 

The largely visual nature of the web means that we tend to focus on supporting people who are blind or partially sighted. But deaf and hard of hearing people are often overlooked. I spoke with Ruth MacMullen, who is an academic librarian and copyright specialist from York in the UK, about her experience of being deaf and how it affects her use of the web.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Sounding out the web: accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing people [Part 1] | The Paciello Group – Your Accessibility Partner (WCAG 2.0/508 audits, VPAT, usability and accessible user experience)

9 Video Secrets Only Top Marketers Know – Ai-Media

4. They know that mobile is king and silence is golden.

On Facebook, three-quarters of all video content is seen on a mobile device. Since smartphones allow us to watch videos anywhere that’s connected to the Internet, we’re watching video almost everywhere. And when you’re in public places, silence is golden.Here’s a look at how our Facebook fans typically consume our videos. This is one of our posts that went viral with over 6 million views. What’s noticeable is how that over 5 million of those views were without sound.

On this occasion that’s 82% of all views being without sound.

According to Facebook:“In mobile-feed environments, people prefer having the choice to opt in to sound. Our research found that when feed-based mobile video ads play loudly when people aren’t expecting it, 80% react negatively, both toward the platform and the advertiser.

Advertisers should take this into account when creating video ads, making sure their stories don’t require sound to communicate their message.

”Adding closed captions to your video allows your audience to watch silently and discreetly on their morning commute (or from the bathroom stall) without drawing any attention to themselves.

According to Facebook, adding captions leads people to spend an average of 12% more time watching your videos. In a world where time is our most precious commodity, that’s more time being spent watching your content.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 9 Video Secrets Only Top Marketers Know – Ai-Media

Being a deaf developer

… Some deaf people successfully become programmers. It’s mostly thought-based, often solitary work, where all your output is written down. Specifications and bugs come to you (in an ideal world, at least) on paper and in ticketing systems instead of through other people’s noiseholes. Some areas aren’t quite so fabulous (I’m looking at you, interminable conference call meetings involving 15 people sitting in a circle around a gigantic table), but adjustments are always possible.

The stereotype of a programmer as a solitary eccentric who’s allergic to human company is unfair and inaccurate. As a group, we’re a very social bunch. We write blogs, we speak at conferences, we produce tutorials, we mentor. This isn’t new, either – it’s an atmosphere that dates from before the earliest days of the internet at Bell Labs, or MIT, and scores of other R&D orgs. I love this social world of code, as being able to surround yourself with competent, enthusiastic individuals is a big part of becoming a better developer yourself. But one thing that I’ve always felt shut out of is pair programming.

Pair programming, in principle, is great – it’s like Rubber Duck debugging on steroids.

So it was great to get the opportunity to pair with Rowan Manning on the Pa11y project, the automated accessibility testing tool built for Nature. Using Screenhero to set up a remote pairing session meant that we could both look at the screen and use text to communicate, losing no information and generating no confusion.

This was the first time I’ve done a pairing session that worked as it should. It’s difficult to express what a difference this makes as I think most hearing people find it hard to appreciate how much information loss occurs in general conversation with a deaf person. Imagine that in your city that all the books you’ve ever read have had ~60% of the words in them randomly blanked out with a Sharpie. Then imagine going on holiday to a neighbouring city where (mercifully) nobody does that and you can suddenly read an entire book without needing to guess at anything. It’s a bit like that.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Being a deaf developer

Deaf News: Deaf woman is awarded e-Accessibility scholarship for mobile app for interpreters and carers | The Limping Chicken

A Deaf woman has been awarded an EDF-Oracle e-Accessibility scholarship for her project developing a mobile application to seamlessly connect persons with disabilities with caregivers, interpreters and assistants.Caroline Hurley is studying computer science at Open University in the United Kingdom.

THE AWARDED PROJECT

Caroline’s project is to develop a mobile application to seamlessly connect persons with disabilities with caregivers, interpreters and assistants. Through this application, persons with disabilities can be able to quickly check care workers’ nearest location and their availability. For example, a case study showed how a deaf person spent an entire day to find a sign language interpreter for a next-day doctor’s appointment, since there are very few interpreters in the European Union (EU). Caroline’s application can be beneficial to people with disabilities requiring ‘face-to-face’ care workers urgently.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Deaf News: Deaf woman is awarded e-Accessibility scholarship for mobile app for interpreters and carers | The Limping Chicken

Being a deaf developer

I’ve been deaf since infancy. It is not profound; my hearing loss is described as moderate to severe and is mostly problematic at higher frequency ranges, the range at which most human speech happens.

I rely on lip-reading and identifying vowel patterns to understand spoken language. Particular struggles are:recognising consonants, especially sibilants and unvoiced consonants (all consonants are high frequency sounds, and the unvoiced and sibilant consonants don’t activate the vocal chords)the beginning of sentencesthe end of sentencesSome deaf people successfully become programmers. It’s mostly thought-based, often solitary work, where all your output is written down.

Specifications and bugs come to you (in an ideal world, at least) on paper and in ticketing systems instead of through other people’s noiseholes. Some areas aren’t quite so fabulous (I’m looking at you, interminable conference call meetings involving 15 people sitting in a circle around a gigantic table), but adjustments are always possible.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Being a deaf developer