Tag Archives: design

How Current Design Trends Impact Web Accessibility

Hands sketching a website layout on a digital tablet, meant to illustrate a UX Designer working to create a layout with web accessibility and inclusive design in mind.

“You are not your users.”
“Involve people with disabilities in user testing.”
“The average user does not exist.”
“Design for the extremes, and the middle will take care of itself.”

We hear these phrases all the time, yet a lot of people still believe that accessibility is mostly a quality assurance or developer’s responsibility, something they should only have to think about when the actual coding phase begins. But some of the really impactful decisions that make or break accessibility for people with disabilities and seniors are, in fact, made during the design phase.

Yes, you read that right. Let me rephrase it for you: a lot of the accessibility issues that people run into on our sites and applications are caused by uneducated decisions made during the design phase. You and I have the power to do something about that.

In this post, we’ll explore some of the design trends we increasingly run into on the Web today, and how decisions made during the design phases can have a hugely detrimental effect on anyone who uses the web in a slightly differently way. But first…

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Read full article at Source: How Current Design Trends Impact Web Accessibility

Important things to in mind for Accessibility & Usability of an application

A mobile application is a medium where a user can get all the information related to your services and products. Here, UI (User Interface) and UX (User Experience) part plays an important role. It can help you to increase the acceptability of an app. Accordingly, it increases the usability of an application will inflate the accessibility.

To increase the usability of an application, you need to take care of a couple of things that are mentioned below.

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Read full article at Source: Important things to in mind for Accessibility & Usability of an application

Accessible website design for users with disabilities lags far behind demand

“The internet is, in essence, broken,” said Todd Bankofier, the CEO of accessibility software company AudioEye. Last week the company announced a partnership with web design firm Dealer Inspire, which makes customer-facing sites for auto retailers, to implement AudioEye’s Ally Toolbar across their entire portfolio.

The move “expands our reach immediately, making it much more efficient to continue our mission to make the most expansive infrastructure in the world accessible to everyone,” Bankofier added.

Even the most well-meaning brand leaders and site designers have too narrow a view of what constitutes disability, he said. It’s not just people who are blind, deaf, or use wheelchairs: people with autism, PTSD, visual impairment, epilepsy, dyslexia or colorblindness all have different needs for digital access. AudioEye’s Ally Toolbar takes all these users into account and allows a person to select precisely the site they need to see.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessible website design for users with disabilities lags far behind demand | Campaign US

Designing inclusively: Some examples

The video below has lots of examples of designing inclusively in the built environment. There are two key messages: get a diverse group of people together before you start designing, and think about all the extra people you can serve or sell to when you design with everyone in mind. While there are several videos around with a similar message, it is good to see the variety of environments covered – from transport to theatre.

Rather than take an off-the-shelf ATM, Barclays Bank commissioned the design of their ATMs and came up with the idea of a niche to hang your walking stick – a key factor as if it falls to the ground, the owner may not be able to bend down to pick it up.

The video is 8 minutes but worth the watch to the end.


Curated by (Lifekludger)
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Inclusive – Microsoft Design

Inclusive Design at Microsoft

It’s in our mission statement: empower every person on the planet to achieve more. Designing for inclusivity opens up our experiences and reflects how people adapt to the world around them.

Our inclusive design principles

Recognize exclusion

Exclusion happens when we solve problems using our own biases. As Microsoft designers, we seek out those exclusions, and use them as opportunities to create new ideas and inclusive designs.

Learn from diversity

Human beings are the real experts in adapting to diversity. Inclusive design puts people in the center from the very start of the process, and those fresh, diverse perspectives are the key to true insight.

Solve for one, extend to many

Everyone has abilities, and limits to those abilities. Designing for people with permanent disabilities actually results in designs that benefit people universally. Constraints are a beautiful thing.

Inclusive: A Microsoft design toolkit

The toolkit is a comprehensive resource for any inclusive session you want to lead. Practice new skills, develop new concepts, or create a prototype – the toolkit is made to be retrofitted to your design team’s goals. Download everything here, and start exploring!

 …

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Read full article at Source: Inclusive – Microsoft Design

ARIA Labels and Relationships  |  Web  |  Google Developers

using aria-label to identify an image only buttonLabels

ARIA provides several mechanisms for adding labels and descriptions to elements. In fact, ARIA is the only way to add accessible help or description text. Let’s look at the properties ARIA uses to create accessible labels.

aria-label

aria-label allows us to specify a string to be used as the accessible label. This overrides any other native labeling mechanism, such as a label element — for example, if a button has both text content and an aria-label, only the aria-label value will be used.

You might use an aria-label attribute when you have some kind of visual indication of an element’s purpose, such as a button that uses a graphic instead of text, but still need to clarify that purpose for anyone who cannot access the visual indication, such as a button that uses only an image to indicate its purpose.

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Read full article at Source: ARIA Labels and Relationships  |  Web  |  Google Developers

Accessibility for Visual Design

They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder. As designers, we need to remember that the same is true of color and all visual abilities. It’s estimated that 4.5% of the global population experience color blindness (that’s 1 in 12 men and 1 in 200 women), 4% suffer from low vision (1 in 30 people), and 0.6% are blind (1 in 188 people). It’s easy to forget that we’re designing for this group of users since most designers don’t experience such problems.

Today’s products must be made accessible for everyone–regardless of a person’s abilities. Designing for users with visual or other impairments is an example of how designers can practice empathy and learn to experience the world from someone else’s perspective.

Creating accessible design seems like a difficult task. Fortunately, as a designer you don’t need to become an expert on visual impairment issues; you can make sure that your design is good for this group of users by keeping in mind a few solid best practices, which we’ll review in this article.

One caveat: not every best practice will apply to all users with visual impairments, but at least some of it will apply to a very large majority of them.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility for Visual Design | UX Booth

How Design for Accessibility Drives Innovation for All

Comcast recently made a big splash in the world of assistive technology by launching the industry’s first voice-enabled television user interface, or “talking TV guide,” which gives blind and visually impaired customers the ability to independently explore and navigate thousands of shows and movies.

Comcast’s vice president of accessibility Tom Wlodkowski, who is blind, said the new interface “is as much about usability as it is about accessibility.”

Eminently more usable than navigating a complicated channel grid, voice command also comes in handy for people with sight.

Think about the multitaskers who don’t have their hands free to manipulate a remote control – the laundry folders, the moms who’re nursing babies, the social media surfers.

Aging populations also benefit greatly from voice user interfaces.

What Accessibility Has To Do With Usability

Realizing that products designed for accessibility end up making life better for everyone else, Comcast launched an accessibility lab to drive research and development. I heard Wlodkowski give an inspiring presentation about accessibility and innovation at the 2016 Forge Conference and it got me thinking about how the desire to address disability drives innovation forward.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How Design for Accessibility Drives Innovation for All | Bresslergroup

The 7 Factors that Influence User Experience 

User Experience (UX) is critical to the success or failure of a product in the market but what do we mean by UX? All too often UX is confused with usability which describes to some extent how easy a product is to use and it is true that UX as a discipline began with usability – however, UX has grown to accommodate rather more than usability and it is important to pay attention to all facets of the user experience in order to deliver successful products to market.

There are 7 factors that describe user experience, according to Peter Morville a pioneer in the UX field who was written several best-selling books and advises many Fortune 500 companies on UX:

  • Useful
  • Usable
  • Findable
  • Credible
  • Desirable
  • Accessible
  • Valuable

Let’s take a look at each factor in turn and what it means for the overall user experience:

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Read full article at Source: The 7 Factors that Influence User Experience | Interaction Design Foundation

Former Microsoft design director on shaping Hololens, Xbox and Cortana with inclusive design thinking

Kat Holmes is the former principal director of Inclusive Design at Microsoft. In this episode, we talk about the definition of inclusive design, take an inside look at her “special ops” design unit, and dive into the best method for deploying human-centered design.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Former Microsoft design director on shaping Hololens, Xbox and Cortana with inclusive design thinking | TechCrunch