Tag Archives: design

Prototyping accessibility in web and mobile UI design

Adaptable, interactive and coherent prototypes for users with disabilities. Covering accessibility in the prototyping phase of web and app design.

Pay close attention to color, contrast and visual hierarchy

Make your interactive UI elements more interactive

Don’t crowd me!

Make your app accessible by being adaptable

“Flexibility is the key to ensuring that your website is accessible to everyone.” Shaun Anderson, Hobo Web

Prototyping responsive design is actually pretty easy. With Justinmind prototyping tool, it really only involves creating a set of screens of different sizes (to represent the different screens sizes that your users use), adding the content to each screen, and adding linking events between the screens. In fact, we’ve created a nifty tutorial in our Support section to teach you step by step.

Don’t forget the user testing

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Read full article at Source: Prototyping accessibility in web and mobile UI design

What the Heck Is Inclusive Design? ◆ 24 ways

Recently, I’ve been using the term “inclusive design” and calling myself an “inclusive designer” a lot.

I’m not sure where I first heard it or who came up with it, but the terminology feels like a good fit for the kind of stuff I care to do when I’m not at a pub or asleep.

This article is about what I think “inclusive design” means and why I think you might like it as an idea.Isn’t ‘inclusive design’ just ‘accessibility’ by another name?

No, I don’t think so. But that’s not to say the two concepts aren’t…

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Read full article at Source: What the Heck Is Inclusive Design? ◆ 24 ways

How to Describe Complex Designs for Users with Disabilities – Salesforce UX

You’re a developer who has just been handed a complex design spec. You know the designs support accessibility because your UX team read a…

in Section 508 contains one very sage suggestion. It states that,

“… sufficient information about a user interface element including the identity, operation and state of the element shall be available to assistive technology.”

Originally written for software, these words are even more relevant today given the prevalence of web based applications. They describe the type of information users with disabilities need in order to successfully complete a task. This could be a blind user with a screen reader, a voice input user with a physical disability, or any number of other types of users with a variety of assistive technologies.

The basic fundamentals of making any interaction accessible with both the keyboard and for screen reader users comes down to providing three basic pieces of information: identity, operation, and state.

Users interacting with an element as basic as a checkbox, or as complex as drag and drop experience, have to consider these three questions:

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Read full article at Source: How to Describe Complex Designs for Users with Disabilities – Salesforce UX – Medium

Designing Perfect Text Field: Clarity, Accessibility and User Effort

Designing Perfect Text Field: Clarity, Accessibility and User Effort04 AUGUST 2016 on UX, Design, UI

For any app or web application, nothing will ever happen without some initial and ongoing input from the user. It is, therefore, critical that product designers, developer and product managers understand the best ways to allow them to do so.

In this article we’ll examine key factors that improve data input by focusing on text fields. Keep in mind that these are general guideline and there are exceptions to every rule.

A text field is a basic text control that enables the user to type a small amount of text. No matter what app you use, you’re bound to run across some little text field requiring your personal information. Even typing a question into Google is considered filling out a form which has only one text field.

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Read full article at Source: Designing Perfect Text Field: Clarity, Accessibility and User Effort

We’re just temporarily abled: Designing for the future – InVision Blog

We need to design for accessibility not only for folks who are permanently visually impaired, hard of hearing, or have severe motor issues right now, but also for our future selves.

Design for the future you

With each passing birthday, our vision is starting to go. Eventually our hearing will start to go and so will our mobility. I will have these issues, you will have these issues—they’re just part of the aging process.

We aren’t just designing accessible products and websites for a subgroup of people who we may or may not know, who have permanent visual or motor issues. We’re designing these sites and products for our future selves as well.

The next time you’re tempted to brush off accessibility while you’re working on a design, picture yourself in 20 or 30 years trying to use your own website or product. It’s a pretty life-changing shift in thinking. I like to call it “forced empathy.”

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Read full article at Source: We’re just temporarily abled: Designing for the future – InVision Blog

7 Accessibility Sins I’m Tired of Pointing Out to UI/UX Designers

Dear UI/UX designer, I’m tired of seeing these mistakes over and over again coming out from UI/UX designers I’ve worked with. Some are exceptionally talented, producing beautiful web or app designs…

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Read full article at Source: 7 Accessibility Sins I’m Tired of Pointing Out to UI/UX Designers | μεταcole

Web Accessibility and Keeping Others in Mind – snack o’clock

Website accessibility has been on my mind recently. A few years back, one of the biggest trends on the web was subtlety. Medium gray text on light gray backgrounds, super-thin fonts, etc. all looked quite elegant to designers, but in … Continue reading →

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Read full article at Source: Web Accessibility and Keeping Others in Mind – snack o’clock

We’re Just Temporarily Abled : Designing for the Future : Designing for the Future

We aren’t just designing accessible products and websites for a subgroup of people who we may or may not know, who have permanent visual or motor issues. We’re designing these sites and products for our future selves as well.

A few years ago, I had the opportunity to attend and present at a great conference where Cindy Li delivered a phenomenal keynote.I learned about 8 million new things during her talk, but she made one particular statement that really stuck with me.

She simply said,“We’re all just temporarily abled.”

She talked a little bit about her mother who has an ocular disease that is slowly blinding her over time. Then she mentioned that while she doesn’t have an ocular disease herself, she is beginning to require stronger glasses prescriptions each year.

Why am I talking about Cindy’s eye health? Because she then pointed out that as designers we need to design for accessibility, not only for folks who are permanently visually or hearing impaired or have severe motor issues right now, but also for our future selves.

Design for the future you.

With each passing birthday, our vision is starting to go. Eventually our hearing will start to go and so will our mobility. I will have these issues, you will have these issues–they’re just part of the aging process.We aren’t just designing accessible products and websites for a subgroup of people who we may or may not know, who have permanent visual or motor issues. We’re designing these sites and products for our future selves as well.The next time you’re tempted to brush off accessibility while you’re working on a design, picture yourself in 20 or 30 years trying to use your own website or product. It’s a pretty life changing shift in thinking. I like to call it “forced empathy.”

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Read full article at Source: We’re Just Temporarily Abled : Designing for the Future : Designing for the Future | UX Magazine

Learning Is For Everyone: Instructional Design For Accessibility (Free Technical Article!) – eLearning Industry

Instructional Design For Accessibility: How To Ensure That Learning Is For Everyone Designing eLearning that is accessible for people with disabilities isn’t easy. The key is to find ways in which basic principles of good web design, along with the principles of Universal Design, can improve access to and the experience of eLearning for all learners, regardless of ability. In Learning Is For Everyone: Instructional Design For Accessibility free technical article, Obsidian Learning examines several importa

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Read full article at Source: Learning Is For Everyone: Instructional Design For Accessibility (Free Technical Article!) – eLearning Industry