Tag Archives: employment

There’s Always Something to be Done: Liz Henry on Being Disabled in Tech

Liz Henry, with plastic framed glasses, purple blue hair, and a hoody, sits in the Longmore Institute. Her motorized wheelchair is to her left.

Liz is currently the release manager for Mozilla, and has worked in two eras of tech: the 1990s and the mid-2000s to the present. She learned her computer skills from tinkering with computers from a young age, and having the freedom to experiment. In addition to her work in open source software, Liz is a blogger, writer and translator, and is involved in hackerspace projects. Liz deals with mobility impairments, and chronic pain from those impairments, that have a significant effect on how she can work.

The structure of Liz’s work at Mozilla has many benefits for her because of her mobility impairments. Instead of working on a traditional hourly schedule, she has longer timeframes, like six weeks to work on a project. This means that even if she is not productive over a specific hour or even a day, she is very productive over the course of those six weeks. In addition to this, Liz often works remotely with a distributed team who are in many different time zones around the world. It is not important that everyone be working at the same time. It’s more important that communication is strong, persistent, and frequent.  If she has a flare-up and is unable to leave the house she still has the possibility of getting work done. She often thinks, as she is working from bed, that this job is perfect for people with mobility issues.

In addition, the fact that her physical condition can change at a moment’s notice means that she is very good at contingency planning. And since software release, as she describes it, can be  “a constant disaster,” this skill is very helpful in her workplace. In her opinion, anyone with a disability who has managed their own healthcare competently, with all the medical, insurance, and government bureaucracies, has many skills needed in software project management – tracking a complex process and coordinating work across several teams.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: There’s Always Something to be Done: Liz Henry on Being Disabled in Tech – Disability Remix Blog

Canada’s new accessibility laws should focus on employment, inclusive buildings, transport 

The priorities, which were laid out in a report and released by the federal government Monday, summarize eight months of consultations held with Canadians from coast to coast. Carla Qualtrough Qualtrough, the minister tasked with crafting laws to make Canada more accessible to people with disabilities, says employment will be a key focus of her efforts.  (JUSTIN TANG / THE CANADIAN PRESS)   By MICHELLE MCQUIGGEThe Canadian Press Mon., May 29, 2017 Public consultations on Canada’s first national law for d……

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Canada’s new accessibility laws should focus on employment, inclusive buildings, transport | Toronto Star

Disability and Graduate Job Hunting | Robbie Crow

I’m blind. Not completely, but I’m registered blind. I have been since birth and there’s no chance of fixing it. During my life I’ve faced many challenges, most of which I’ve overcome.

Nevertheless, the hardest thing I’ve ever had to do as a blind person is find a job. Why? Of course, I face the ‘standard’ problems that recent graduates with sight face, such as a saturated job market with a plethora of graduates competing against each other, but I think there’s something more. I believe that any impairment, not just visual impairment, is a barrier to employment – but only because disabled people don’t know how to talk positively about their impairment. I’m a fairly confident blindy but even I struggled.The biggest problem is judgemental employers. The advent of Auntie Facebook, Uncle Google, and cousin LinkedIn has meant that employers, now more than ever, find it easy to ‘research’ interviewees. They shouldn’t, and none will admit to it, but they do.

Firstly, we’ve been problem solving and independently thinking since we were little. From getting on the wrong bus or train (or plane – don’t ask) and getting lost or being given print that’s too small to read at school, we’ve had to figure out the best way to turn that situation around rather quickly. We (nearly) always succeed – because we have to. Working independently is our jam, too. Often we work in ways which are magical and mythical to others – how do we avoid those lampposts? How do we know how far away that car is?

What I’ve learnt since leaving university is that being disabled isn’t a barrier to working. Having a bad attitude with your impairment is. If you treat disability right, it can be advantageous to your situation but only if you have the right mindset. Be the writer of your own future, don’t be the reader.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Disability and Graduate Job Hunting | Robbie Crow