Tag Archives: Future

We’re just temporarily abled: Designing for the future – InVision Blog

We need to design for accessibility not only for folks who are permanently visually impaired, hard of hearing, or have severe motor issues right now, but also for our future selves.

Design for the future you

With each passing birthday, our vision is starting to go. Eventually our hearing will start to go and so will our mobility. I will have these issues, you will have these issues—they’re just part of the aging process.

We aren’t just designing accessible products and websites for a subgroup of people who we may or may not know, who have permanent visual or motor issues. We’re designing these sites and products for our future selves as well.

The next time you’re tempted to brush off accessibility while you’re working on a design, picture yourself in 20 or 30 years trying to use your own website or product. It’s a pretty life-changing shift in thinking. I like to call it “forced empathy.”

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: We’re just temporarily abled: Designing for the future – InVision Blog

We’re Just Temporarily Abled : Designing for the Future : Designing for the Future

We aren’t just designing accessible products and websites for a subgroup of people who we may or may not know, who have permanent visual or motor issues. We’re designing these sites and products for our future selves as well.

A few years ago, I had the opportunity to attend and present at a great conference where Cindy Li delivered a phenomenal keynote.I learned about 8 million new things during her talk, but she made one particular statement that really stuck with me.

She simply said,“We’re all just temporarily abled.”

She talked a little bit about her mother who has an ocular disease that is slowly blinding her over time. Then she mentioned that while she doesn’t have an ocular disease herself, she is beginning to require stronger glasses prescriptions each year.

Why am I talking about Cindy’s eye health? Because she then pointed out that as designers we need to design for accessibility, not only for folks who are permanently visually or hearing impaired or have severe motor issues right now, but also for our future selves.

Design for the future you.

With each passing birthday, our vision is starting to go. Eventually our hearing will start to go and so will our mobility. I will have these issues, you will have these issues–they’re just part of the aging process.We aren’t just designing accessible products and websites for a subgroup of people who we may or may not know, who have permanent visual or motor issues. We’re designing these sites and products for our future selves as well.The next time you’re tempted to brush off accessibility while you’re working on a design, picture yourself in 20 or 30 years trying to use your own website or product. It’s a pretty life changing shift in thinking. I like to call it “forced empathy.”

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: We’re Just Temporarily Abled : Designing for the Future : Designing for the Future | UX Magazine

Why Accessibility Will Matter More in 2016 and Beyond

It’s easy to believe everyone uses computers the same way until you actually watch friends and family struggling with theirs. If only developers were encouraged to test user interfaces on all computer devices in real life situations.

Since they are not expected to perform this type of testing, what marketers end up with are web pages and software applications intended to work for a small percentage of people.  It may not seem evident that any performance issues even exist until the data in production signals trouble.  And that’s the eternal roadblock every internet marketer faces sooner or later.  They have achieved rank, links, inbound traffic and every other marketing requirement and yet the data indicates high bounce rates, poor referrals, low conversions and various other signals of dismal performance.

What’s happening?

Traditionally, one of the next steps is to hire a usability consultant to perform a website audit.  A few are capable of software functional and user interface testing forms and applications such as shopping carts, travel reservation applications or proprietary internet software, but most are not trained for this.  For years a basic usability review consisting of a heuristics review and cognitive walk through covered basic web page usability standards compliance.  Later, persuasive design, conversions and customer experience design were added to help create even more robust site audits.

That last step was supported by the findings from the human factors and neuroscience fields, which exploded with studies on human computer behavior.  How we do anything online, from search queries to online ordering, is evaluated by people all around the world and their reports eventually reach people like me who apply their information to enhance the user experience for clients’ websites.

Accessibility Remains A Low Priority

Accessibility is a word that is beginning to lose its home.  The same thing happened with usability.  In fact, many in the internet marketing industry don’t use the term “usability” anymore because it is, for starters, vague and inexact. They find that terms like “conversions”, “user experience”, “user intent”, “customer experience”, “conversions experience” and “customer satisfaction” are more accurate phrases and indeed, they offer a more precise description.  Still, there are no formal standards for those terms, or testing methodology regimen performed uniformly by marketers who provide site audits that include conversions analysis.  For example, there are no heuristics for conversions testing to follow.  And even though usability standards and heuristics exist, some have changed over the years.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Why Accessibility Will Matter More in 2016 and Beyond

The Future of Accessibility Innovation | Foreign Policy

The 2015 FP Global Demographics Student Essay Contest, underwritten by AARP, invited college and graduates students from around the world to participate in an intergenerational discussion about the opportunities presented by a rapidly aging world. Dozens of students from nearly every continent shared their ideas with FP. The winning essay is presented below.

The development of accessibility innovation products and services is the greatest opportunity presented by the aging trend to the global community. Not only is the market opportunity tremendously attractive, but the resources available to entrepreneurs and innovators — ranging from start-ups to small- and mid-size enterprises to multinational corporations — to develop products and services aimed at people with disabilities have never been better.

Age directly correlates with disability: As overall personal health declines with the development of acute and chronic diseases, such as diabetes, arthritis, cardiovascular diseases, and respiratory problems, disability rates increase. Seniors with a mobility disability may have difficulty walking up and down stairs, standing in one spot for prolonged periods, or moving from one room to another. Agility disabilities include difficulty bending down, dressing or undressing, getting in and out of bed, or grasping small objects.

The primary goal and benefit of accessibility innovation products is to allow the aging global population to continue participating in the social and cultural life of their local community.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The Future of Accessibility Innovation | Foreign Policy