Tag Archives: google

How Google designs for the blind

All the big technology companies have dedicated teams working on accessibility — making software and hardware features that allow people with disabilities to use them. Employing people who have disabilities is one way to make sure tools are built with accessibility in mind…

Someone with perfect vision might not think to design traffic maps that can be understood by a colorblind user. YouTube engineer Ken Harrenstien, who is profoundly deaf, made it his mission to work on closed captioning for videos.

“If you don’t have an immediate family member or a friend who has a disability, you simply don’t know. It’s not that you want to exclude someone who has a disability, you just don’t know it,” said Astrid Weber, a user experience researcher at Google whose work has been influenced by a close friend with MS.

Weber collaborates with Google’s thousands of engineers and designers to make them think of accessibility while building products. She encourages employees to design with empathy, and to drop certain assumptions, like that everyone can touch an Android device or hear the sound an app makes.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How Google designs for the blind – Aug. 4, 2015

Speech Recognition – Coming of Age!

Google recently added Voice Typing to Google Docs which really has taken speech recognition to the next level. By simply plugging in a microphone to a desktop computer students can start to use speech recognition immediately. I have found that the speech recognition that’s built into Google Docs to be very accurate and allows students to quickly get their ideas down.┬áVoice Typing opens up all kinds of opportunities for students to quickly get their ideas down on the page. With the advent of this API other companies have been using and integrating the Voice Typing into their apps. You will now find Voice Typing integrated into Co:Writer Universal, WordQ, as well as Read and Write for Google Chrome.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Speech Recognition – Coming of Age!