Tag Archives: guide

New Guide for Affordable and Accessible Technology Now Available Online

A new guide from ACCAN and Media Access Australia was launched this year at the annual ACCAN conference. The Affordable Access project addresses two of the key pillars of digital inclusion – affordability and accessibility of technology.

The Affordable Access project is an online guide which provides information on low-cost technology with useful accessibility features. The online resource also highlights what technology may be suitable for specific scenarios. These scenarios were created in collaboration with people with disabilities to identify commonly used products for various needs. This peer advice is a great approach to the guides as people accessing them can be confident that others are also using the technology.

Affordability and accessibility are essential if all Australians are to participate in an increasingly digitally-dependant society. However, the recent Digital Inclusion Index noted that people with a disability are some of the most digital excluded people groups in Australia. Helping people find the right technology is also a large part of the challenge, especially in specific cases such as the ones listed on the Affordable Access website.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: New Guide for Affordable and Accessible Technology Now Available Online | Go Digi

The ultimate guide to web content accessibility

Websites with standards-compliant code all follow the typical W3C standards. But there’s a whole different level of compliance when it comes to WCAG, also known as the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines.

The same people who produce the HTML5/CSS3 specs organize and officiate these guidelines, so it’s truly an international system of coding standards. Most web developers never bother with WCAG accessibility, but it’s becoming a huge aspect of the internet.

If you’re looking to understand accessibility or just want to delve a bit deeper into the subject, then this guide is for you. I’ll explain some basics of WCAG conformance for a beginner, along with all the tools and resources you’ll need to keep learning along the way.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The ultimate guide to web content accessibility – InVision Blog

How to do Web Accessibility QA: Part 2 | Viget

 

Accessibility QA starts with broadening your frame of reference and understanding what it’s like to use a computer in unfamiliar ways. With that understanding, we can dive into actual testing.

The usual starting point is to read the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (aka WCAG), which define the current accessibility standard. (The older Section 508 standard is relevant only for government sites.) But good luck understanding WCAG on first glance.

WCAG is broken into three levels (A, AA, AAA); four principles; 12 guidelines; and 61 success criteria. It’s hard to make sense of WCAG’s multi-layered categorization, jargon, and sheer number of items.

The good news: You don’t have to worry about all that to get started. Instead, I find it easier to think in terms of these broad goals:

  • Goal 1: People who don’t use a mouse should be able to use and understand a site.
  • Goal 2: People who don’t look at a screen should be able to use and understand a site.
  • Goal 3: A site’s content should be visually legible.
  • Goal 4: People should have access to alternate versions of video and audio content.
  • Goal 5: People should have control over automatic changes to the page.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source:
How to do Web Accessibility QA: Part 2 | Viget

How to do Web Accessibility QA: Part 1 | Viget

If you’re nervous about doing accessibility QA for the first time, I’m with you. Thanks to Jeremy Fields and others, I had multiple background sessions — but I still felt lost when it came time for real testing.

Don’t sweat it; a11y testing is straightforward once you understand a few foundational concepts. Here’s my two-part guide to accessibility testing so you can help make your sites as inclusive as possible. (Here’s Part 2.)

Start by experiencing how people use a computer differently than you: with a keyboard (no mouse) and screen reader.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How to do Web Accessibility QA: Part 1 | Viget

Demystifying cognitive disability – Media Access Australia

 

Cognitive disability can be a difficult condition to understand. This is particularly the case for organisations wanting to be able to find out how to better address the communication needs of their managers, staff and consumers with a cognitive disability, in a media context.

 

That’s why Media Access Australia has created a practical resource for organisational support: the Cognitive Disability Digital Accessibility Guide, which is free to download from the Media Access Australia website.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Demystifying cognitive disability – Media Access Australia

The Accessibility Tree: A Training Guide for Advanced Web Development

Brilliant resource.

At the top level, the first concept to understand is the platform Accessibility API, which is an integral part of each Operating System. This is MSAA/UIA/IAccessible2 on Windows, AT-SPI/IAccessible2 on Linux, the OS X Accessibility Protocol on Mac and iOS, and so on.It may not be obvious, but these top level accessibility APIs have a direct relationship with web technology development, and are critical for the accessibility of interactive ARIA Widgets in particular.

For example, at the platform level in the Windows OS, there is a Checkbox control type. This is documented at the Microsoft Developer Network’s Checkbox Class.When a control such as this, or of any other type, is rendered as part of the Graphical User Interface (GUI), the control and all of its public properties and states, is included in the Accessibility Tree.

The Accessibility Tree is a hierarchical construct of objects that include accessible names and descriptions, plus supporting states and properties, which Assistive Technologies can interface with to enhance accessibility.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: The Accessibility Tree: A Training Guide for Advanced Web Development

The Accessibility Guide for Windows 10 and Office 2016 – helping students with special needs – Education – Site Home – MSDN Blogs

A Microsoft focused Education ICT blog from Australia covering K-12 ICT, TAFE ICT and University ICT, on subjects such as LMS and VLE systems, education CRM systems for student recruitment and student retention, cloud-based education and learning analytics and assessment.

Source: The Accessibility Guide for Windows 10 and Office 2016 – helping students with special needs – Education – Site Home – MSDN Blogs

Design for Everyone Guide | Sport and Recreation Victoria

The guide is a resource that uses the principles of Universal Design to provide users with an understanding of how to apply the philosophy of Universal Design during the design and construction phases of a new building or the redevelopment of a current facility.

The concept of Universal Design is to simplify life for everyone by making the built environment more usable to as many users as possible.

It is separate from accessible design as Universal Design is based on the equitable use of a facility and social inclusion and not the measurement of accessible design features and meeting minimum legislative requirements.

Applied holistically to a building without an alternative for different groups, Universal Design addresses issues of having a different approach for different users, which not only improves and simplifies the way a facility is used but also eliminates user segregation to maximise participation by users of all abilities.

http://www.sport.vic.gov.au/design-for-everyone-guide

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Read full article at Source: Design for Everyone Guide | Sport and Recreation Victoria

Katrina the Tester: Accessibility & Usability Testing Pathway

Accessibility & Usability Testing Pathway

This pathway is a tool to help guide your self development in accessibility and usability testing. It includes a variety of steps that you may approach linearly or by hopping about to those that interest you most.

Each step includes:

links to a few resources as a starting point, but you are likely to need to do your own additional research as you explore each topic.

a suggested exercise or two, which focus on reflection, practical application and discussion, as a tool to connect the resources with your reality.

curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Katrina the Tester: Accessibility & Usability Testing Pathway