Tag Archives: images

Provide accessible images | Online Accessibility | harvard.edu

Provide accessible images

Images can be effective way to convey meaning, such as to provide additional information to text content or to assign labels to buttons. Text alternatives are vital for people who can’t see them. When icons are added as images, the best practice is the same as for providing alternative text for images. When other methods are used, such as background images or icon fonts, additional care is needed to ensure that their meanings are available to screen reader users, people with reading difficulties, and those who use Windows High Contrast Mode or who need to apply a user-defined style sheet that changes fonts.

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Read full article at Source: Provide accessible images | Online Accessibility

Making images accessible for people on Twitter | Twitter Help Center

Making images accessible for people on Twitter

When you Tweet photos using the Twitter app for iOS or Android, you have the option to compose a description of the images so the content is accessible to people who are visually impaired.

This article includes information about how to enable the Compose image descriptions setting and instructions for composing image descriptions using:

Twitter for iOS
Twitter for Android
VoiceOver on Twitter for iOS
Talkback on Twitter for Android

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Read full article at Source: Making images accessible for people on Twitter | Twitter Help Center

Five kinds of ‘alt’ text

What’s less commonly known is that there are five different classes of image used on web pages and each of those images requires a different approach to writing the ‘alt’ attribute.

The five different classes are:

  • Eye candy.
  • Clip art and stock images.
  • Images that express a concept.
  • Functional images.
  • Graphs, complex diagrams and screenshots.

The ‘alt’ text you write will be different for each of these classes of image.

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Twitter Adds Alt-Text Image Descriptions to Extend Tweet Accessibility

At last year’s Twitter Flight developer conference, CEO Jack Dorsey, as part of a wider effort to mend bridges with the developer community, called for ideas for updates to the service. The fourth most requested feature was providing the ability to add alternative text for images, enabling better functionality for people who are visually impaired.

Twitter’s now actioned that request – from today, people using both the iOS and Android versions of the Twitter app will be able to add descriptions of up to 420 characters to images within Tweets.

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Read full article at Source: Twitter Adds Alt-Text Image Descriptions to Extend Tweet Accessibility | Social Media Today

Facebook Automated Captions Improve Accessibility, Provide Additional Insights | Social Media Today

… Facebook announced the release of automatic alternative text – or automatic alt text – for images posted to Facebook. Automatic alt text uses object recognition technology to generate a description of a photo, processing each through Facebook’s artificial intelligence engine to establish image content.

At the time of launch, the team has focused the system on recognizing approximately 100 different concepts based on their prominence in Facebook photos as well as the accuracy of the visual recognition engine. “The current concepts, for example, cover people’s appearance (e.g., baby, eyeglasses, beard, smiling, jewelry), nature (outdoor, mountain, snow, sky), transportation (car, boat, airplane, bicycle), sports (tennis, swimming, stadium, baseball), and food (ice cream, pizza, dessert, coffee). And settings provided different sets of information about the image, including people (e.g., people count, smiling, child, baby), objects (car, building, tree, cloud, food), settings (inside restaurant, outdoor, nature), and other image properties (text, selfie, close-up).” Based on these parameters, the system’s able to provide highly accurate image results.

See more at: http://www.socialmediatoday.com/social-networks/facebook-automated-captions-improve-accessibility-provide-additional-insights#sthash.joOC9qvd.dpuf

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Read full article at Source: Facebook Automated Captions Improve Accessibility, Provide Additional Insights | Social Media Today

Ensure High Contrast for Text Over Images – Nielsen Norman Group

Summary: If you place text over a background image, make sure it’s readable by providing adequate contrast. Subtle tweaks can increase the contrast without affecting the overall aesthetic of the site.

A well-chosen visual adds interest and can set the tone of a website, in addition to (hopefully) conveying some meaning. Eyetracking research has shown that people are attracted to information-carrying photos, when the images are related to the user’s current task. (If instead the images appear to be purely decorative, they will likely be completely ignored.) Images can quickly prompt an emotional response in viewers and can spur them into taking some type of action. This ability of an image to elicit a positive visceral response has caused many designers to create interfaces that are highly visual, downplay text, and often contain large background images or videos. (Large pictures are frequently encountered in conjunction with minimalism, although they do not quite define this design trend.)

Because images play such an important role, often designers end up placing text over an image to leverage the attention-grabbing aspect of the photo while providing text-based content to communicate actual information. However, these endeavors commonly backfire, usually when the contrast between the text and the background is too low. According to accessibility requirements for color contrast, text that is not purely decorative or part of a logo should have a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1 (or 3:1 for large characters, defined as an 18-point font, or a 14-point bold font).

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Read full article at Source: Ensure High Contrast for Text Over Images

Describing Images for Improved Web Accessibility | Mediacurrent

One of the most basic techniques of web accessibility is adding alternative texts to images. It is possibly the single biggest thing you can do to make your site more accessible. In fact, it is the very first item listed in the WCAG 2.0 guidelines:

WCAG 2.0 Guideline 1.1.1 – “All non-text content that is presented to the user has a text alternative that serves the equivalent purpose.”  The most common way of meeting this guideline is adding an alt attribute to the image tag:

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Read full article at Source: Describing Images for Improved Web Accessibility | Mediacurrent